Is there any body who is majoring in engineering or is already an engineer? Specifically electrical possibly.

  • Kromethius

    Posts: 156

    Mar 12, 2013 9:24 AM GMT
    The reason I ask I just have some concerns and some questions about the work in college and dealing with the stress of academics of getting there while coping with being gay. Moreover, how is it when you finally get to where you want to be? Thank you
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    Mar 12, 2013 3:00 PM GMT
    MIS37 saidThe reason I ask I just have some concerns and some questions about the work in college and dealing with the stress of academics of getting there while coping with being gay. Moreover, how is it when you finally get to where you want to be? Thank you



    Not any different than many other professions.

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    Mar 12, 2013 3:09 PM GMT
    Great choice for a profession if you want job security and a decent living wage. Horrible if you have any sort of creative side that needs to be expressed (you won't get in in engineering). If you are a people person, the profession is not for you. If you enjoy sitting in front of a computer screen 90% of your work day and not interacting with people very often, the profession is suited for you.

    This has been my experience anyway.

    (Also, management is awful because management requires people skills - something engineers sorely lack and managers are usually promoted from the ranks of the engineers, hence bad managers.)

    Also, not gay friendly. Not exactly gay hostile either; however, engineers tend to be very conservative and narrow-minded. If you aren't out (and I suggest you don't come out at work if you choose engineering), you will have to tolerate some pretty bigoted comments made about gays in the lunch room and around the water cooler.
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    Mar 12, 2013 3:12 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan saidGreat choice for a profession if you want job security and a decent living wage. Horrible if you have any sort of creative side that needs to be expressed (you won't get in in engineering). If you are a people person, the profession is not for you. If you enjoy sitting in front of a computer screen 90% of your work day and not interacting with people very often, the profession is suited for you.

    This has been my experience anyway.

    (Also, management is awful because management requires people skills - something engineers sorely lack and managers are usually promoted from the ranks of the engineers, hence bad managers.)

    Also, not gay friendly. Not exactly gay hostile either; however, engineers tend to be very conservative and narrow-minded. If you aren't out (and I suggest you don't come out at work if you choose engineering), you will have to tolerate some pretty bigoted comments made about gays in the lunch room and around the water cooler.



    That has not been my experience. It is very dependent on the the company you join.
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    Mar 12, 2013 3:19 PM GMT
    I can't speak to the difficulty of your studies as I haven't finished my degree yet - so far it's been difficult but manageable. I also don't know how it works in the US but up here, when you graduate with a BASc (Bachelor of Applied Science) or BEng (Bachelor of Engineering), you then register with APEGBC (Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of BC) as an EIT (Engineer in Training). As an EIT you are required to have a P.Eng (Professional Engineer) directly supervise you and sign off on all your work. You'll be an EIT until you have 4 years of work experience in an engineering field, at which time you can submit all your experience as a detailed resume to APEGBC and apply for your P.Eng. You need to write an ethics test and have all your previous employers sign off on it with their recommendation. Once you've done that you are a Professional Engineer with an official seal and the ability to sign off on things.

    As a P.Eng with work experience, you can pretty much write your own ticket with regard to what you want to do (e.g. project management, manager, project engineer, etc). Professional Engineers make a lot more money than EITs do but they're the ones taking responsibility for everything (and if they're self-employed they'll need to get professional liability insurance in case something falls down and they're at fault). Even if you didn't design something, once you sign off on it all the liability (theoretically) is on you, so you have a lot of responsibility. But the pay is worth it.
  • groundcombat

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    Mar 12, 2013 3:25 PM GMT
    I majored in Mechanical Engineering and I'm working as a Systems Engineer in satellite communications systems. I'm working on a mature program at this point so Systems Engineering becomes a lot of program management.

    As far as being gay, because I work a lot with the Air Force I feel like you get some conservative baggage as far as sexuality is concerned but I think the acceptance level is about average. It's not exactly like working in fashion or entertainment but it's not that hostile either. I know a handful of other gays and lesbians around in the industry.

    As for difficulties in studies, I actually had no idea I was gay throughout college and that's probably a good thing. While others were chasing women I was busy studying, working out, and going to church. icon_rolleyes.gif Lame, but I may not have had the discipline to finish it if I was distracted by horny, shirtless boys running around.
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    Mar 12, 2013 3:50 PM GMT



    I need to marry one.icon_biggrin.gif
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    Mar 12, 2013 3:50 PM GMT
    I do EE support (pcb design).

    I suspect you may have an easier time in general with being gay as there is such a "huge shortage" (in Microsoft's words) of engineers, they are offering to pay more in income taxes to increase the number of H1B's. One of many reasons major tech employers are asking the Supreme Court to repeal gay marriage ban laws in the US. California needs qualified engineers too.

    I've noticed that to do real design work at larger companies, you are expected to have a MSEE degree. Bachelor of Arts programs and Bachelors of Science degrees will put you ahead of the BSEET's and in many cases, are now a requirement to be an engineering technician (which not a bad career path...)

    The best advice I can give you is: EE's need to know RF (high-speed design) to do anything with digital. Calc was more fun than smith charts. I've run into many digital engineers wishing they had taken more of those courses in college.
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    Mar 12, 2013 4:06 PM GMT
    ^^^ True.

    No matter how brilliant and innovative you are, if you can't collaborate, you're gonna have a hard time. I've worked with PHd's who had their careers saved by the bench techs.

    A problem is engineers who have spent much of their career flying solo are now branching out into complex projects that require teamwork. They have limited experience in teams getting things done in parallel.

    Unfortunately, management is a popular career path for EE's in larger companies. Sometimes, you get lucky.
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    Mar 12, 2013 4:22 PM GMT
    I did computer/electrical engineering in college, but went the medical school route now I am in residency. Very few people believe me, but my engineering classes (upper level E fields II, e circuits, micro P) were harder than anything I experienced in medicine. All I can tell you is if you are having difficulty go to tutors/office hours. My school, University of Florida (go Gators!!) had free tutoring services that were really helpful, and we were encouraged to study in groups which helped a lot. As far as being gay, I was not out then so things were different for me.
    Good luck MIS37!
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    Mar 12, 2013 5:05 PM GMT
    MIS37 saidThe reason I ask I just have some concerns and some questions about the work in college and dealing with the stress of academics of getting there while coping with being gay. Moreover, how is it when you finally get to where you want to be? Thank you


    Why are you coping with being gay?

    While EE is a demanding programming, academically, it's like any other. You get out and you get a job, and either you like it, or not, and make choices as you go along.

    Most things worth doing ARE hard. We walk into those challenges, walking into through, above, and beyond them. Life is like that.

    Those who defer from challenges are the ones you see working in retail, or food service, etc. Good things are OFTEN hard.

    There should no reason to "cope" with being gay. That's you being head fucked. Embrace who you are; get rid of the false belief systems about who you are (religion/cults/etc), and move forward. Like yourself, and stay focused on your mission.

    EE is known for being especially grueling academically, but, you get it done, and move on.
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    Mar 12, 2013 5:09 PM GMT
    I think the academics can be very challenging, so you should be prepared for hard work and several difficult classes. Learning not to procrastinate is key. It will give you the opportunity to comprehend what's going in lectures and to ask questions and attend office hours. Find classmates that you can collaborate with. I wasn't so disciplined in school and I now see how that made a hard situation worse.

    The reward at the end is a degree which can open doors to high quality jobs in companies doing innovative stuff. Also, you will have a sense of accomplishment which will help you get through challenging projects later in life. The engineering environment can be geeky and there is a lot of individual work, but most products require a lot of teamwork as well. Getting into a good team will make a tremendous difference. And once you get the hang of engineering there will be opportunities to get into other types of work too.

    EE is a very wide field now, so you will have to choose which area you want to concentrate on. I'm in chip design which requires knowledge of semiconductors, transistors, circuits, logic, architecture, and software. There are areas in EE which are more mathematical or more oriented towards physics and materials science or bordering on computer science.

  • Headphones

    Posts: 1

    Mar 12, 2013 5:23 PM GMT
    You're at a very conservative school (Texas A&M) and in a field that doesn't attract all the many gay guys, especially gay guys who are OUT in college.

    So, you may feel a bit isolated within your major. Maybe you have trouble relating to other students in your department.

    As a closeted (and mostly in denial) engineering student at a very similar school, that was my experience. I never had much of a problem finding classmates to do homework or projects with (thanks mostly to the female students who were in my major), but I didn't get invited to do things socially outside of class with people in my major like most everyone else in our classes did.

    You might just have to separate your "EE student self" and your "gay self" in the way that most of us do in the professional world - even those of us who are 100% out at work.

    EE is a very demanding major. At the best engineering schools, arguably the most rigourous academically of any engineering field.

    Think of your degree program as your job and focus on doing really well in your courses. At the same time, work hard to maintain friendships with friends in other majors (this can be harder in junior and senior years when you get so busy with your main courseweork) and/or make friends with people in other majors. Personally, most of my friends in college ended-up being in liberal arts.

    DON'T be closed-off to making friends with your EE classmates. Just don't expect too much from them, I'd say.

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    Mar 12, 2013 5:25 PM GMT
    Shawnathan saidThe best part of studying Engineering must be that nobody seems to mind how everyone 'works together' and copies the smartest student.


    ^^ I thought I could actually pinch you, fortunately your right! icon_sad.gif ...so,

    NEXT. icon_evil.gif
  • Kromethius

    Posts: 156

    Mar 12, 2013 9:02 PM GMT
    I really do appreciate the plethora of responses you guys have given me. I just feel sort of lonely because I'm a second year junior and I still haven't found alot of friends/relationships here due to my sexuality, race, and major I believe. I'm trying to maintain my academics but I feel as if its difficult to progress without anything to look forward to.
  • Kromethius

    Posts: 156

    Mar 12, 2013 9:13 PM GMT
    Thats not what I meant, what I'm saying is that I can see that it will be a great career but I never have drank or smoked so I'm isolated on top of being scrutinized for race as well as being gay.