D-Aspartic Acid

  • He_Man

    Posts: 906

    Mar 17, 2013 5:12 PM GMT

    I've been using D-Aspartic Acid for a little over two weeks now, but man, this stuff has some really negative side effects on me. I take 3,000mgs on an empty stomach first thing in the morning.

    Within an hour of ingesting it, I have to run to the bathroom for some very unpleasant business. I am also experiencing slight headaches from it but figured that it was due to the increase of nitric oxide, which causes vasodilation, so this is more likely causing the headaches.

    Has anyone every used DAA? If so, what were your experiences with the supplement?
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    Mar 19, 2013 12:09 AM GMT
    I googled and didn't find much info on side effects; but I did find lots of info about how ineffective it is for building muscle.
  • He_Man

    Posts: 906

    Mar 19, 2013 12:38 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidI googled and didn't find much info on side effects; but I did find lots of info about how ineffective it is for building muscle.


    Yeah, thanks Paul. Like most supplements, it's probably hype and marketing. Although, I did read several studies where it did raise testosterone levels by as much as 33%, but then again, it's probably the manufacturers doing the studies.
  • gwuinsf

    Posts: 525

    Mar 19, 2013 8:09 PM GMT
    Well my understanding of DAA is that it's a building block for Testosterone. So it's not going to magically make you have more, but it will help you create it if your body is demanding that you create more. I think ZMA is in that same boat.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Mar 19, 2013 8:31 PM GMT
    It seems weird that you'd be supplementing the biologically inactive stereoisomer of aspartic acid... Almost all bio molecules are in the L conformation, and this specific molecule isn't, destroying its biological usage. At least from my understanding...
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    Mar 19, 2013 9:08 PM GMT
    Yeah, I might trust every biochemistry textbook on the planet a little more than advertising hype from bodybuilding.com.

    Only L-aspartate can be used to make proteins, but both forms can be catabolized. You can also get racemerization.

    I'm guessing that the real reason for this supplement is that a whole bunch of cheap D-aspartate is available as a by-product of some process.
  • E_84

    Posts: 201

    Mar 20, 2013 12:31 AM GMT
    Some people need to make sure their "understanding" is accurate. So much misinformation out there.

    It is infact D-Aspartic Acid, and has been found to raise testosterone levels. You will start to even see it in various supplemental products (pre-workout (BSN HyperFX), Intra-workout, and Post-workout). Better absorption occurs when taken with Vitamin D. You will usually see the two together in a supplement product. Should be cycled 4 weeks like other testosterone boosting supplements.

    As for your side effect. It shouldn't do that. Maybe it something else that you are taking at the same time. Try different products at different times to identify the possible trigger.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Mar 20, 2013 12:40 AM GMT
    E_84 saidSome people need to make sure their "understanding" is accurate. So much misinformation out there.

    It is infact D-Aspartic Acid, and has been found to raise testosterone levels. You will start to even see it in various supplemental products (pre-workout (BSN HyperFX), Intra-workout, and Post-workout). Better absorption occurs when taken with Vitamin D. You will usually see the two together in a supplement product. Should be cycled 4 weeks like other testosterone boosting supplements.

    As for your side effect. It shouldn't do that. Maybe it something else that you are taking at the same time. Try different products at different times to identify the possible trigger.


    There was only one study doe relating to testosterone, and it was fairly inconclusive. I don't think that jumping on the bandwagon with this lack of evidence is justified..,
  • E_84

    Posts: 201

    Mar 20, 2013 1:06 AM GMT
    Stop talking
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Mar 20, 2013 1:08 AM GMT
    E_84 saidStop talking


    That was amazingly helpful, thanks. As an alternative, how about you contribute some useful discourse instead of, well, nothing.
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    Apr 17, 2013 5:55 AM GMT
    you might find the following interesting , i know i did.

    http://www.charlespoliquin.com/Blog/tabid/130/EntryId/611/D-Aspartic-Acid-Is-It-All-Hype.aspx

    D-Aspartic Acid...Is It All Hype?

    Wednesday, August 24, 2011 1:08 PM
    D-Aspartic Acid (D-Asp) has received a lot of attention in the strength training world for claims that it can raise testosterone levels. Research has found that D-Asp can increase testosterone but there is a lack of convincing evidence from studies done on humans. After reviewing the literature, the question remains, is it worthwhile to take this supplement or are you better off making sure your magnesium, omega-3, and essential amino acids levels are at their best?

    What is D-Aspartic Acid?
    D-Asp is an endogenous amino acid and is found in the neuroendocrine tissues of humans. There is evidence that D-Asp plays a role in sperm production and that it is involved in the release of testosterone (T), growth hormone (GH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). It also modulates melatonin synthesis and is found in high concentration in the pineal gland. In boars and lizards D-Asp has also been shown to enhance the conversion of testosterone to estrogen.

    What Ergogenic Effect Does D-Asp Have in Humans?
    In men, D-Asp has been found to improve motility of sperm and raise T levels. In an Italian study, after supplementing with a 20 mM solution of D-Asp (about 3 grams of D-Asp) for 12 days, 87 percent of the subjects had significantly increased LH and T levels (from 4.5 ng/ml serum to 6.4 ng/ml) by 33 and 42 percent, respectively.

    Researchers point to the fact that six days into the dosing protocol, T was only slightly elevated, whereas after 12 days it was significantly higher and stayed higher for three days after stopping the supplementation. This was thought to be due to evidence that when supplementation is suspended, D-Asp levels are maintained for at least three days in the testes, continuing to trigger T production. A study conducted on rats at the same time, indicated that D-Asp regulates the synthesis of LH from the pituitary and T from the testes. This hormone response is mediated in the pituitary by cGMP and in the testis by cAMP.

    Further support for D-Asp is seen with a recent study that gave a supplement of pycnogenol (60 mg/d), l-arginine (690 mg/d), and aspartic acid (552 mg/d) to Japanese patients with erectile dysfunction. Taking the supplement for eight weeks improved sexual function and increased testosterone slightly. The aspartic acid supplement was small, which may be one of the reasons there was only a small T increase.

    D-Asp in Mammals: Does it Raise Estrogen Levels?
    One of the first ever studies into the relationship between D-Asp and T found that there was a strong correlation between D-Asp and T levels in rat testes. Additionally, feeding the rats with D-Asp increased T levels, and there was also an increase in progesterone and estrogen. Another study demonstrated that D-Asp supplementation raises GH levels in rats as well.

    In boars, D-Asp does lead to an increase in T production, but it also leads to a 17B-estradiol synthesis, which in turn generates estrogens (its production depended on a testosterone substrate and was enhanced by D-Asp—estrogen production was two times greater than controls).

    D-Asp in Ducks: Confusing Evidence
    Another study performed on male ducks looked at the relationship between D-Asp and T, and between nitric oxide (NO) on T. Ducks typically go through an annual mating cycle in which both D-Asp and T are elevated and NO is at a low level. During the non-reproductive cycle, the D-Asp and T were low, whereas the NO levels were high.
    An in vitro study found that when testis cells had D-Asp added to them, T was increased, whereas when the cells had L-arginine, a precursor of NO, it was inhibited. Research on humans does not appear to support the idea that L-arginine inhibits T production, yet there is significant evidence that in rats NO does inhibit T production by limiting release of a steroidogenic enzyme.

    What Can We Take From This Research?
    Due to a lack of studies done on humans, it’s probably best to stay skeptical about the benefits of D-Asp. The one study from 2008 hasn’t been replicated on humans and additional evidence isn’t currently available. For strategies to raise T levels naturally, check out Testosterone Boosters, and the Testosterone Response: Get Anabolic Part 1.
  • He_Man

    Posts: 906

    Apr 17, 2013 6:01 AM GMT
    xassantex saidyou might find the following interesting , i know i did.

    http://www.charlespoliquin.com/Blog/tabid/130/EntryId/611/D-Aspartic-Acid-Is-It-All-Hype.aspx

    D-Aspartic Acid...Is It All Hype?



    That was a great read, xassantex. Thank you.

    I stopped taking it about a week after I posted this because it was going right through me, cramping me and making me gassy. I know, sorry, TMI! icon_lol.gif

    Plus it was giving me headaches, so between being gassy, cramping and headaches, I decided that the slight testosterone increase, if any, wasn't worth it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 17, 2013 7:12 PM GMT
    im taking it also , out of curiosity really .
    feeling like a pig most of the time, it might have some effect.