San Diego: Doctors Specializing in Sports Injuries: Tendonitis

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 17, 2013 7:32 PM GMT
    Anyone here ever use a doctor specializing in sports injuries in San Diego? I need to find one. Any recommendations or leads would be much appreciated.

    I am have been suffering from persistent tenderness in my right shoulder (almost certainly tendonitis) for almost three weeks as as result of weight lifting.

    I have seen my regular doctor, who prescribed an anti-inflammatory, which I have been taking. Also, I have stopped all workouts, have been resting the shoulder, wearing a sling, using cold packs, and using a heating pad to no avail. Quite depressing.

    I have to do more. Finding the right doctor has now become one of my top priorities.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 18, 2013 3:05 AM GMT
    My opinion on this is that unless you actually have a real injury and not tendonitis, you shouldn't be seeing a medical doctor and rather should be seeing a physical therapist or chiropractor. MDs only can do drugs and surgery as treatment. They are not trained in how the body works naturally like the previous two are (whether you go allopathic or alternative depending on the practitioner's expertise). Tendonitis is resolved naturally without drugs at all if you let it rest and do rotator cuff exercises in most cases, but MDs won't know this because 1) most of them don't exercise and 2) they don't make any money from that and 3) exercise physiology isn't their curriculum--they study pathophysiology. With musculoskeletal injuries, they aren't caused by a virus or bacteria. They were caused by you not doing something right and not listening to the queues your body tells you about.

    Yes rest is important, but you need to figure out, probably with a qualified personal trainer (ie someone with an ATC, CSCS, master's degree), what the heck you are doing to it in the first place. Secondly, as we get older people overtrain because the body doesn't repair as fast as it did when we were 16. And of course, nutrition plays a role as well, but you can overtrain even with perfect nutrition. And just because you may think you're not overtraining, think about all the repetitive movements that require your shoulder on a daily basis. Maybe you're sleeping on it funny too. I'd spend my money on all these other allied health care providers because an MD, even an orthopedic, won't do what's in your best interest as a human being. They do surgical and drug manipulations with bones. These are last resort techniques...not for someone who wants to heal naturally. Tendonitis isn't a big deal requiring anti-inflammatory drugs and surgery.
  • suprbilt

    Posts: 16

    Mar 18, 2013 5:10 AM GMT
    Best bet would be to find an Active Release Therapist



  • xysx

    Posts: 306

    Mar 18, 2013 5:47 AM GMT
    It's a valid question, since many insurance co's require a visit to a MD who will then make a referral to a specialty sports physician, &/or PT/ OT/ for rehab. Also valid, though, is that most insurance carriers will cover massage, body work, acupuncture, etc, with a cap of visits per calendar year. I think it's worthwhile to investigate all modalities with your insurance carrier, so you can get as thorough a treatment plan as you can, as some cases of tendonitis can take up to 18 months to fully recover from.
    `good luck, & good healing.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 19, 2013 12:10 AM GMT
    bluey2223 saidMy opinion on this is that unless you actually have a real injury and not tendonitis, you shouldn't be seeing a medical doctor and rather should be seeing a physical therapist or chiropractor. MDs only can do drugs and surgery as treatment. They are not trained in how the body works naturally like the previous two are (whether you go allopathic or alternative depending on the practitioner's expertise). Tendonitis is resolved naturally without drugs at all if you let it rest and do rotator cuff exercises in most cases, but MDs won't know this because 1) most of them don't exercise and 2) they don't make any money from that and 3) exercise physiology isn't their curriculum--they study pathophysiology. With musculoskeletal injuries, they aren't caused by a virus or bacteria. They were caused by you not doing something right and not listening to the queues your body tells you about.

    Yes rest is important, but you need to figure out, probably with a qualified personal trainer (ie someone with an ATC, CSCS, master's degree), what the heck you are doing to it in the first place. Secondly, as we get older people overtrain because the body doesn't repair as fast as it did when we were 16. And of course, nutrition plays a role as well, but you can overtrain even with perfect nutrition. And just because you may think you're not overtraining, think about all the repetitive movements that require your shoulder on a daily basis. Maybe you're sleeping on it funny too. I'd spend my money on all these other allied health care providers because an MD, even an orthopedic, won't do what's in your best interest as a human being. They do surgical and drug manipulations with bones. These are last resort techniques...not for someone who wants to heal naturally. Tendonitis isn't a big deal requiring anti-inflammatory drugs and surgery.


    You make some very good points.

    Your advice about doctors is valid up to a point. I have found one who I think will be good and I made an appointment today. I've read her profile and watched a Youtube video in which she is featured. She is clearly not your "typical" doctor. She is certified in Sports Medicine, an athlete, and clearly believes in physical therapy. I'm almost certain she'll prescribe it for me.

    I like your advice about a personal trainer. I've never had one and don't belong to a gym. I work out in a mini-gym in my home. How do I go about finding one?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 19, 2013 11:51 PM GMT
    justin_pal said
    bluey2223 saidMy opinion on this is that unless you actually have a real injury and not tendonitis, you shouldn't be seeing a medical doctor and rather should be seeing a physical therapist or chiropractor. MDs only can do drugs and surgery as treatment. They are not trained in how the body works naturally like the previous two are (whether you go allopathic or alternative depending on the practitioner's expertise). Tendonitis is resolved naturally without drugs at all if you let it rest and do rotator cuff exercises in most cases, but MDs won't know this because 1) most of them don't exercise and 2) they don't make any money from that and 3) exercise physiology isn't their curriculum--they study pathophysiology. With musculoskeletal injuries, they aren't caused by a virus or bacteria. They were caused by you not doing something right and not listening to the queues your body tells you about.

    Yes rest is important, but you need to figure out, probably with a qualified personal trainer (ie someone with an ATC, CSCS, master's degree), what the heck you are doing to it in the first place. Secondly, as we get older people overtrain because the body doesn't repair as fast as it did when we were 16. And of course, nutrition plays a role as well, but you can overtrain even with perfect nutrition. And just because you may think you're not overtraining, think about all the repetitive movements that require your shoulder on a daily basis. Maybe you're sleeping on it funny too. I'd spend my money on all these other allied health care providers because an MD, even an orthopedic, won't do what's in your best interest as a human being. They do surgical and drug manipulations with bones. These are last resort techniques...not for someone who wants to heal naturally. Tendonitis isn't a big deal requiring anti-inflammatory drugs and surgery.


    You make some very good points.

    Your advice about doctors is valid up to a point. I have found one who I think will be good and I made an appointment today. I've read her profile and watched a Youtube video in which she is featured. She is clearly not your "typical" doctor. She is certified in Sports Medicine, an athlete, and clearly believes in physical therapy. I'm almost certain she'll prescribe it for me.

    I like your advice about a personal trainer. I've never had one and don't belong to a gym. I work out in a mini-gym in my home. How do I go about finding one?


    It's a crap shoot. Just look for good credentials and formal education as well as experience in athletics and interview what they would say about a injury?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 21, 2013 4:35 AM GMT
    bluey2223 saidMy opinion on this is that unless you actually have a real injury and not tendonitis, you shouldn't be seeing a medical doctor and rather should be seeing a physical therapist or chiropractor. MDs only can do drugs and surgery as treatment. They are not trained in how the body works naturally like the previous two are (whether you go allopathic or alternative depending on the practitioner's expertise). Tendonitis is resolved naturally without drugs at all if you let it rest and do rotator cuff exercises in most cases, but MDs won't know this because 1) most of them don't exercise and 2) they don't make any money from that and 3) exercise physiology isn't their curriculum--they study pathophysiology. With musculoskeletal injuries, they aren't caused by a virus or bacteria. They were caused by you not doing something right and not listening to the queues your body tells you about.

    Yes rest is important, but you need to figure out, probably with a qualified personal trainer (ie someone with an ATC, CSCS, master's degree), what the heck you are doing to it in the first place. Secondly, as we get older people overtrain because the body doesn't repair as fast as it did when we were 16. And of course, nutrition plays a role as well, but you can overtrain even with perfect nutrition. And just because you may think you're not overtraining, think about all the repetitive movements that require your shoulder on a daily basis. Maybe you're sleeping on it funny too. I'd spend my money on all these other allied health care providers because an MD, even an orthopedic, won't do what's in your best interest as a human being. They do surgical and drug manipulations with bones. These are last resort techniques...not for someone who wants to heal naturally. Tendonitis isn't a big deal requiring anti-inflammatory drugs and surgery.


    I beg to differ from your perception.
    I am an MD, an athlete, and a Sports Medicine Doctor, board certified (in case you care to ask).

    First of all, doctors can't 'only do drugs and surgery as treatment', as there are multiple other options.
    Second, you are presuming the person knows FOR SURE he has tendonitis (or tendinosis).
    Physical therapists and chiropractors are invaluable, and in sports medicine we use them often. Now, I recently saw in my office a young athlete with 'tendonitis' that had gone to acupuncture, physical therapy and chiropractic evaluation and was treated for nearly 3-4 months. He was 'getting better with so called 'natural' remedies' and rest...while deconditioning fast.
    Someone suggested he come see us, and thankfully he decided not to blind himself to medicine, which is as much science as the nutrition you recommend.
    In the end that 'tendonitis' was a rhabdomyosarcoma (aggressive muscle cancer) identified with imaging and muscle biopsy, not by a physical therapist, chiropractor, or a gym trainer.

    Granted, these tumors are not common, but they are just one example of what can be believed 'to be nothing'. Dismissing a discomfort as 'just a tendonitis that doesn't require medical evaluation' could be similar to leaving a sports car with a flat tire. When you need its optimum, it will go down.

    Everyone in the health field has their value, and while your advice kinda sorta sends someone in the right direction it potentially skips important steps based on a skewed view. Yeah, there are some bad physicians out there (just like there are bad physical therapists, chiropractors, gym trainers, dietitians, even ice cream sellers), but if our experience with one was bad we shouldn't just send all others to the dumpster.
    In Sports Medicine (talking from an insider's point of view, who doesn't just claim to understand the field), we tend to believe in teamwork (not drugs) in order to better assess and treat our patients, and you'd be surprised at the exercise, therapy and sports advice you could get from a Sports Physician.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 22, 2013 3:13 AM GMT
    Vanderhagast said
    bluey2223 saidMy opinion on this is that unless you actually have a real injury and not tendonitis, you shouldn't be seeing a medical doctor and rather should be seeing a physical therapist or chiropractor. MDs only can do drugs and surgery as treatment. They are not trained in how the body works naturally like the previous two are (whether you go allopathic or alternative depending on the practitioner's expertise). Tendonitis is resolved naturally without drugs at all if you let it rest and do rotator cuff exercises in most cases, but MDs won't know this because 1) most of them don't exercise and 2) they don't make any money from that and 3) exercise physiology isn't their curriculum--they study pathophysiology. With musculoskeletal injuries, they aren't caused by a virus or bacteria. They were caused by you not doing something right and not listening to the queues your body tells you about.

    Yes rest is important, but you need to figure out, probably with a qualified personal trainer (ie someone with an ATC, CSCS, master's degree), what the heck you are doing to it in the first place. Secondly, as we get older people overtrain because the body doesn't repair as fast as it did when we were 16. And of course, nutrition plays a role as well, but you can overtrain even with perfect nutrition. And just because you may think you're not overtraining, think about all the repetitive movements that require your shoulder on a daily basis. Maybe you're sleeping on it funny too. I'd spend my money on all these other allied health care providers because an MD, even an orthopedic, won't do what's in your best interest as a human being. They do surgical and drug manipulations with bones. These are last resort techniques...not for someone who wants to heal naturally. Tendonitis isn't a big deal requiring anti-inflammatory drugs and surgery.


    I beg to differ from your perception.
    I am an MD, an athlete, and a Sports Medicine Doctor, board certified (in case you care to ask).

    First of all, doctors can't 'only do drugs and surgery as treatment', as there are multiple other options.
    Second, you are presuming the person knows FOR SURE he has tendonitis (or tendinosis).
    Physical therapists and chiropractors are invaluable, and in sports medicine we use them often. Now, I recently saw in my office a young athlete with 'tendonitis' that had gone to acupuncture, physical therapy and chiropractic evaluation and was treated for nearly 3-4 months. He was 'getting better with so called 'natural' remedies' and rest...while deconditioning fast.
    Someone suggested he come see us, and thankfully he decided not to blind himself to medicine, which is as much science as the nutrition you recommend.
    In the end that 'tendonitis' was a rhabdomyosarcoma (aggressive muscle cancer) identified with imaging and muscle biopsy, not by a physical therapist, chiropractor, or a gym trainer.

    Granted, these tumors are not common, but they are just one example of what can be believed 'to be nothing'. Dismissing a discomfort as 'just a tendonitis that doesn't require medical evaluation' could be similar to leaving a sports car with a flat tire. When you need its optimum, it will go down.

    Everyone in the health field has their value, and while your advice kinda sorta sends someone in the right direction it potentially skips important steps based on a skewed view. Yeah, there are some bad physicians out there (just like there are bad physical therapists, chiropractors, gym trainers, dietitians, even ice cream sellers), but if our experience with one was bad we shouldn't just send all others to the dumpster.
    In Sports Medicine (talking from an insider's point of view, who doesn't just claim to understand the field), we tend to believe in teamwork (not drugs) in order to better assess and treat our patients, and you'd be surprised at the exercise, therapy and sports advice you could get from a Sports Physician.




    I agree that not all practitioners in a field are good or bad, and I'm sorry if my post offended. In my personal experience with medical doctors, all of them have always wanted to do drugs and surgery for anything. Runny nose? Take pills or let me burn your nose out...Acne? Let's give you Accutane, which has to be one of the most poisonous medications ever, and you're giving it to a 16 year old...who would have zits no matter what he does at that age...
    But honestly, muscle cancer has to be one of the rarest cancers in the world. I understand MDs like to r/o any sort of serious complications, but tendonitis and going to a sports med doc, most will want to give corticosteroid shots and/or pills. This was done for me as a 17-18 yr old high school athlete, and my knees have never been the same. Drugs are prescribed way too often, and proper healing should be done, especially at ages when you are still growing (up to 25!). Your training in terms of treating someone is not always the best or in their best interest; our society looks at MDs as the go-to for everything, and unfortunately that time has past. Chronic disease and chronic injuries are left to other practitioners unless a person is lazy and wants a quick fix. You're not going to fix that in an MD's office.

    If you are a different sort of practitioner, then good for you. I'd go to you if you do a multidisciplinary approach and present options to the patient that allows them to choose how they are going to heal up and the consequences of drugs and surgery, which were not presented to me when I was 17. Obviously I wasn't going to the Olympics, and 10 years later, I wish I had options then to rest and recover my knee using periodization, light exercise, rest, and ice. Instead, now my tendon cartilage cracks and rubs against my knee thanks to all that hypertrophy the treatment they gave me.
  • bumblejacket

    Posts: 66

    Mar 22, 2013 3:35 AM GMT
    bluey2223 said
    Vanderhagast said
    bluey2223 saidMy opinion on this is that unless you actually have a real injury and not tendonitis, you shouldn't be seeing a medical doctor and rather should be seeing a physical therapist or chiropractor. MDs only can do drugs and surgery as treatment. They are not trained in how the body works naturally like the previous two are (whether you go allopathic or alternative depending on the practitioner's expertise). Tendonitis is resolved naturally without drugs at all if you let it rest and do rotator cuff exercises in most cases, but MDs won't know this because 1) most of them don't exercise and 2) they don't make any money from that and 3) exercise physiology isn't their curriculum--they study pathophysiology. With musculoskeletal injuries, they aren't caused by a virus or bacteria. They were caused by you not doing something right and not listening to the queues your body tells you about.

    Yes rest is important, but you need to figure out, probably with a qualified personal trainer (ie someone with an ATC, CSCS, master's degree), what the heck you are doing to it in the first place. Secondly, as we get older people overtrain because the body doesn't repair as fast as it did when we were 16. And of course, nutrition plays a role as well, but you can overtrain even with perfect nutrition. And just because you may think you're not overtraining, think about all the repetitive movements that require your shoulder on a daily basis. Maybe you're sleeping on it funny too. I'd spend my money on all these other allied health care providers because an MD, even an orthopedic, won't do what's in your best interest as a human being. They do surgical and drug manipulations with bones. These are last resort techniques...not for someone who wants to heal naturally. Tendonitis isn't a big deal requiring anti-inflammatory drugs and surgery.


    I beg to differ from your perception.
    I am an MD, an athlete, and a Sports Medicine Doctor, board certified (in case you care to ask).

    First of all, doctors can't 'only do drugs and surgery as treatment', as there are multiple other options.
    Second, you are presuming the person knows FOR SURE he has tendonitis (or tendinosis).
    Physical therapists and chiropractors are invaluable, and in sports medicine we use them often. Now, I recently saw in my office a young athlete with 'tendonitis' that had gone to acupuncture, physical therapy and chiropractic evaluation and was treated for nearly 3-4 months. He was 'getting better with so called 'natural' remedies' and rest...while deconditioning fast.
    Someone suggested he come see us, and thankfully he decided not to blind himself to medicine, which is as much science as the nutrition you recommend.
    In the end that 'tendonitis' was a rhabdomyosarcoma (aggressive muscle cancer) identified with imaging and muscle biopsy, not by a physical therapist, chiropractor, or a gym trainer.

    Granted, these tumors are not common, but they are just one example of what can be believed 'to be nothing'. Dismissing a discomfort as 'just a tendonitis that doesn't require medical evaluation' could be similar to leaving a sports car with a flat tire. When you need its optimum, it will go down.

    Everyone in the health field has their value, and while your advice kinda sorta sends someone in the right direction it potentially skips important steps based on a skewed view. Yeah, there are some bad physicians out there (just like there are bad physical therapists, chiropractors, gym trainers, dietitians, even ice cream sellers), but if our experience with one was bad we shouldn't just send all others to the dumpster.
    In Sports Medicine (talking from an insider's point of view, who doesn't just claim to understand the field), we tend to believe in teamwork (not drugs) in order to better assess and treat our patients, and you'd be surprised at the exercise, therapy and sports advice you could get from a Sports Physician.




    I agree that not all practitioners in a field are good or bad, and I'm sorry if my post offended. In my personal experience with medical doctors, all of them have always wanted to do drugs and surgery for anything. Runny nose? Take pills or let me burn your nose out...Acne? Let's give you Accutane, which has to be one of the most poisonous medications ever, and you're giving it to a 16 year old...who would have zits no matter what he does at that age...
    But honestly, muscle cancer has to be one of the rarest cancers in the world. I understand MDs like to r/o any sort of serious complications, but tendonitis and going to a sports med doc, most will want to give corticosteroid shots and/or pills. This was done for me as a 17-18 yr old high school athlete, and my knees have never been the same. Drugs are prescribed way too often, and proper healing should be done, especially at ages when you are still growing (up to 25!). Your training in terms of treating someone is not always the best or in their best interest; our society looks at MDs as the go-to for everything, and unfortunately that time has past. Chronic disease and chronic injuries are left to other practitioners unless a person is lazy and wants a quick fix. You're not going to fix that in an MD's office.

    If you are a different sort of practitioner, then good for you. I'd go to you if you do a multidisciplinary approach and present options to the patient that allows them to choose how they are going to heal up and the consequences of drugs and surgery, which were not presented to me when I was 17. Obviously I wasn't going to the Olympics, and 10 years later, I wish I had options then to rest and recover my knee using periodization, light exercise, rest, and ice. Instead, now my tendon cartilage cracks and rubs against my knee thanks to all that hypertrophy the treatment they gave me.



    Jeez you are very biased. Yup you can go back to using natural therapy because back 100 years ago they used a lot of those and sure cured a lot of diseases. There is a place for alternative and complementary treatment but they surely do not replace "western" medicine.
    To the OP, Listen to the doc's advice here. There are family med and sports med doc who knows a lot about musculoskeletal disorders. They may work you up and may require imaging depending on your symptoms. There are ortho doctors as well if you can see a specialist directly. As far as who, I cannot answer because I don't live there.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 22, 2013 4:43 AM GMT
    I agree, you are very biased because of your particular bad experience. And many in sports medicine can give you sound advice regarding therapy and recovery. Corticosteroid shots are not the first option, and they shouldn't be.
    As a matter of fact, I advice anyone who faces a doctor who's first option is a corticosteroid shot in a tendon or join to run away as fast as from someone who says 'doctors just want to give you medications and shots, and medicine is old school'.

    A muscle cancer is rare, yes, but there's a myriad other conditions, as varied as we all are.
    Therefore, the responsible thing to do is to go get it checked, yes, by one of those 'evil' doctors. The treatment after is the patient's choice.

    If the tendon is just inflamed, then good.
    If it has severe degeneration or scarring, rupture, tumors, a physical therapist, chiropractor, gym trainer, herbalist, dietician, priest, ice cream seller, chakra realignment master, or even Captain Planet himself is not going to fix it.

    icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 02, 2013 1:08 AM GMT
    Hi, guys!

    Thanks for all of your feedback.

    Here's an update. The bad news is that my condition hasn't changed one bit. The good news is that I went to see an MD with a background in orthopedics and is board-certified in sports medicine today.

    After an exam and a review of recent x-rays, she says I have shoulder tendonitis. She feels that I probably haven't done major damage and has prescribed physical therapy as the best way to effect recovery. She feels that with four to six weeks of therapy twice a week, there is a high probability that I will feel much better and be able to resume lifting weights. Now, that I have an informed diagnosis and will soon have a therapy plan in place I'm feeling better emotionally. For a while, I was pretty depressed.

    Hopefully, I will be my old self soon. Wish me luck.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 02, 2013 1:20 AM GMT
    Vanderhagast saidI agree, you are very biased because of your particular bad experience. And many in sports medicine can give you sound advice regarding therapy and recovery. Corticosteroid shots are not the first option, and they shouldn't be.
    As a matter of fact, I advice anyone who faces a doctor who's first option is a corticosteroid shot in a tendon or join to run away as fast as from someone who says 'doctors just want to give you medications and shots, and medicine is old school'.

    A muscle cancer is rare, yes, but there's a myriad other conditions, as varied as we all are.
    Therefore, the responsible thing to do is to go get it checked, yes, by one of those 'evil' doctors. The treatment after is the patient's choice.

    If the tendon is just inflamed, then good.
    If it has severe degeneration or scarring, rupture, tumors, a physical therapist, chiropractor, gym trainer, herbalist, dietician, priest, ice cream seller, chakra realignment master, or even Captain Planet himself is not going to fix it.

    icon_smile.gif


    Honestly, fuck you grouping ice cream sellers with esteemed professions. You can go stick a barbed dildo up your ass and fuck yourself. Go make your money.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 02, 2013 3:11 AM GMT
    Justin_pal: glad it wasn't too bad, hope you have a speedy recovery.

    Bluey2223: man, seriously, you seem to have some serious issues. Anger management anyone? As much as you will hate the advice, do the world a favor and take some meds or therapy.
  • WhoDey

    Posts: 561

    Apr 02, 2013 3:18 AM GMT
    bluey2223 said
    Vanderhagast saidI agree, you are very biased because of your particular bad experience. And many in sports medicine can give you sound advice regarding therapy and recovery. Corticosteroid shots are not the first option, and they shouldn't be.
    As a matter of fact, I advice anyone who faces a doctor who's first option is a corticosteroid shot in a tendon or join to run away as fast as from someone who says 'doctors just want to give you medications and shots, and medicine is old school'.

    A muscle cancer is rare, yes, but there's a myriad other conditions, as varied as we all are.
    Therefore, the responsible thing to do is to go get it checked, yes, by one of those 'evil' doctors. The treatment after is the patient's choice.

    If the tendon is just inflamed, then good.
    If it has severe degeneration or scarring, rupture, tumors, a physical therapist, chiropractor, gym trainer, herbalist, dietician, priest, ice cream seller, chakra realignment master, or even Captain Planet himself is not going to fix it.

    icon_smile.gif


    Honestly, fuck you grouping ice cream sellers with esteemed professions. You can go stick a barbed dildo up your ass and fuck yourself. Go make your money.


    Wow somebody has their panties in a bunch