Completed the MS Ride

  • GoodPup

    Posts: 752

    Oct 13, 2008 3:53 AM GMT
    I just today completed the 150 mile MS Challenge. Man... that first 100 on day 1 was tough. Tonight I am icing both knees. One hurts in the front and hurts to bend it... the other hurts in the back and hurts to straighten it.
    Any suggestions for that?
    Other than the knees.... I feel great for completing it!!
  • UStriathlete

    Posts: 320

    Oct 13, 2008 5:58 AM GMT
    Get a professional bike fit. riding a bike should not hurt your knees. your position and technique can hurt your knees.
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    Oct 13, 2008 1:46 PM GMT
    Congrats on completing!

    Yeah, one of the biggest bike fit mistakes is not letting the legs extend sufficiently, by sitting too low. A good bike shop can fit you, and show you how to properly position your saddle height, if you need to do it again on your own. Saddle fore and aft positioning is important, too.

    I'll be pedaling 165 down Key West next month for HIV/AIDS, and I've had knee surgery, and my other one needs it, due to injuries. But I rarely have pain from pedaling, because my bike is well sized and set-up for me.

    I also use my gears to keep my cadence constantly high, meaning there's seldom any heavy pressure on the knee joints. I can tolerate reps better than joint strain. Avoid tall gearing where you have to stand on the pedals for hills. A good bicyclist seldom has to lift off the seat in recreational riding.
  • treader

    Posts: 238

    Oct 13, 2008 5:11 PM GMT
    I agree with the other guys here. Something is seriously wrong if you have to ice your knees after 100 miles. You didn't say what bike you are riding. You should have a good road bike if you are planning on doing century rides. (You wouldn't run a marathon in old running shoe. Don't ride a century ride on an old bike.) If your bike is OK, then the other guys' advice is correct - your bike is not fitted to you and/or you're not using your gears properly. Also I hope that you trained properly for this ride. You should have worked up to a 90 miles in one day two weeks before such an event. 'Winging' such an event is never a good idea.

    Hope that your knees are doing better.

  • GoodPup

    Posts: 752

    Oct 14, 2008 3:27 AM GMT
    I will check on the seat height.. it could also be the training. Up until about 2 weeks before I planned on doing the 100 miles where it is split 60/40 on day one and two. But all the people that take my hour long spin class convinced me to do the 150 with them.

    So I am used to spin... but that is really only 45 minutes worth of work. And I bike to work which is about an hour. But 2 weeks before the ride I did 62 miles... the week before did 90. And then did the 100 miles this weekend.

    So maybe I just amped it up too quickly in addition to the possible seat problems?
  • treader

    Posts: 238

    Oct 15, 2008 6:11 PM GMT

    JaseinOC: I would *not* adjust the seat. Take the bike in and get it fitted. You need to have someone else to look at you while you're riding your bike. They can then recommend the necessary adjustments.

    Spin classes are great but they don't prepare you for the hills. You need to get out there and train on them.

    Get that bike fitted ASAP.
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    Oct 15, 2008 6:15 PM GMT
    treader said
    JaseinOC: I would *not* adjust the seat. Take the bike in and get it fitted. You need to have someone else to look at you while you're riding your bike. They can then recommend the necessary adjustments.

    Spin classes are great but they don't prepare you for the hills. You need to get out there and train on them.

    Get that bike fitted ASAP.


    Yes
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    Oct 15, 2008 6:44 PM GMT
    If you're riding in a higher gear, make sure you gear down when you stop at a stop sign or stop light. Having to start up again in that higher gear is like taking off in 3rd or 4th gear in a car -- it'll wear on your knees.
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    Oct 15, 2008 6:58 PM GMT
    allgoodinhwood saidIf you're riding in a higher gear, make sure you gear down when you stop at a stop sign or stop light. Having to start up again in that higher gear is like taking off in 3rd or 4th gear in a car -- it'll wear on your knees.


    Good advice! Work those gear shift levers like a musical instrument. Unlike a car, a bike needs constant shifting up & down.

    Your goal is to maintain a constant "cadence" which is the rate at which you are pedaling. A slow cadence puts more pressure on the joints.

    Find a comfortable cadence and maintain it with gear shifts as required. You will learn that for long-distance rides, forward speed is less important than your pedaling cadence.
  • GoodPup

    Posts: 752

    Oct 16, 2008 6:00 AM GMT
    Gosh... there is lots I need to correct. ha! I should have learned some of this before the long ride, haha!
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    Oct 16, 2008 4:10 PM GMT
    get well soon man and congrats for the ride!