How to be married in a non-legal state =P

  • Lucky350

    Posts: 167

    Mar 21, 2013 9:52 AM GMT
    Ya could always...get your legal names changed and then you're married....

    I now pronounce you both...cute and married!!!...

    Enjoy the honeymoon =)
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3521

    Mar 21, 2013 5:23 PM GMT
    you could just move to a state or country run by adults
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    Mar 21, 2013 5:31 PM GMT
    Apparition saidyou could just move to a state or country run by adults

    This.
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    Mar 21, 2013 5:34 PM GMT
    Shawnathan saidAll you have to do to be married is have a mutual agreement that you are married. Everything else is icing.


    I wish. Tell it to the tax man, among others - here, if you have one low earner and one high earner, you pay a huge amount more in taxes filing singly as you would filing jointly.

    The law treats married couples differently in many, many ways. Here's a list I found from New York state.

    [url]http://prideagenda.org/Portals/0/1324%20Rights%20and%20Responsibilities_FINAL.pdf[/url] (I can't get the link to go live, sorry.)

    Here's a piece on U.S. federal laws.

    http://www.hrc.org/resources/entry/an-overview-of-federal-rights-and-protections-granted-to-married-couples
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Mar 21, 2013 5:54 PM GMT
    Shawnathan said
    Thanks, I get that there are legal benefits to it. Forgetting about government intrusion, does it really matter for your actual relationship if you're legally married or not?


    That's exactly why people are fighting fr it. I don't know how you missed that.

    'Oh, so if its legal, you get all sorts of perks like tax cuts, visitation rights, power of attorney, etc. but besides all that, it's not important, right?'
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3521

    Mar 21, 2013 6:00 PM GMT
    Shawnathan said
    madfacts said
    Apparition saidyou could just move to a state or country run by adults

    This.

    What really changes by being married in a state run by 'adults' if you're in a country that's not?

    I don't quite get why marriage is state jurisdiction, but the benefit seems to be from the federal government, no? It's the same in Canada, btw.


    I didnt say travel there, i said MOVE there. why would you live in a place where superstitious children get to decide your lives. MOVE its that simple.
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    Mar 21, 2013 6:07 PM GMT
    Shawnathan said
    Apparition said
    Shawnathan said
    madfacts said
    Apparition saidyou could just move to a state or country run by adults

    This.

    What really changes by being married in a state run by 'adults' if you're in a country that's not?

    I don't quite get why marriage is state jurisdiction, but the benefit seems to be from the federal government, no? It's the same in Canada, btw.


    I didnt say travel there, i said MOVE there. why would you live in a place where superstitious children get to decide your lives. MOVE its that simple.

    If you move to a state where same-sex marriage is legal, do you get the federal benefits of marriage?


    Not in the US, because the Defense of Marriage Act currently prohibits the federal government from recognizing same sex marriages for federal purposes.

    If that goes by the wayside (it's currently under challenge in the Supreme Court), my partner and I will probably eventually leave our beloved Virginia for Maryland or DC, where we could get married.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Mar 21, 2013 6:16 PM GMT
    Shawnathan said
    Medjai said
    Shawnathan said
    Thanks, I get that there are legal benefits to it. Forgetting about government intrusion, does it really matter for your actual relationship if you're legally married or not?


    That's exactly why people are fighting fr it. I don't know how you missed that.

    'Oh, so if its legal, you get all sorts of perks like tax cuts, visitation rights, power of attorney, etc. but besides all that, it's not important, right?'

    I know, but shouldn't we also extend the same rights to common law?

    I haven't read up about this stuff too much since I have no expectations of getting married.


    America doesn't. That's kind of the point you seem to be missing.
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    Mar 21, 2013 7:02 PM GMT
    Shawnathan saidAll you have to do to be married is have a mutual agreement that you are married. Everything else is icing.


    Yeah, pretty much...just wish some of the icing was me being able to get unemployment compensation, seeing how I had to quit my job to move for his...you know the way my mom did the three times my dads job moved us.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Mar 21, 2013 8:20 PM GMT
    this thread need a spanish ship to land on it, give it small pox, and make a holiday in celebration of me
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    Mar 21, 2013 8:23 PM GMT
    calibro saidthis thread need a spanish ship to land on it, give it small pox, and make a holiday in celebration of me

    This and already looking for some ships.
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    Mar 21, 2013 8:41 PM GMT
    smartmoney said
    calibro saidthis thread need a spanish ship to land on it, give it small pox, and make a holiday in celebration of me

    This and already looking for some ships.


    I think that the two of you should get married. You seem to have a lot in common. icon_smile.gif
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    Mar 22, 2013 12:57 AM GMT
    Welcome to our life. We got married legally in Iowa in 2009, but live in Missouri. We still tell people we're married, even if the state government doesn't recognize it. We're still married whether others recognize it or not. One day, DOMA will be repealed, and our marriage will be legally recognized everywhere in the U.S.

    As far as moving out-of-state, or to Canada-- that's easier said than done. Our families are here. Our jobs and home are here. Our life is here. Besides, Canada's not exactly welcoming immigrants with open arms.
  • turtleneckjoc...

    Posts: 4685

    Mar 22, 2013 1:18 AM GMT
    SourceFour saidWelcome to our life. We got married legally in Iowa in 2009, but live in Missouri. We still tell people we're married, even if the state government doesn't recognize it. We're still married whether others recognize it or not. One day, DOMA will be repealed, and our marriage will be legally recognized everywhere in the U.S.

    As far as moving out-of-state, or to Canada-- that's easier said than done. Our families are here. Our jobs and home are here. Our life is here. Besides, Canada's not exactly welcoming immigrants with open arms.


    My attorney friend here in Orlando is suggesting to his clients (that bring this question up) they should do the very same thing you have done.

    It is a bit of a stretch, however, I am hopeful we can have our anti-gay marriage law here in Florida struck down. First, we need a new Governor, which is a lock for 2014. It's possible voters will get to repeal this law in November of 2016, if the decision to yea or nay same sex marriage comes down to each state.
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    Mar 22, 2013 1:23 AM GMT
    turtleneckjock said
    SourceFour saidWelcome to our life. We got married legally in Iowa in 2009, but live in Missouri. We still tell people we're married, even if the state government doesn't recognize it. We're still married whether others recognize it or not. One day, DOMA will be repealed, and our marriage will be legally recognized everywhere in the U.S.

    As far as moving out-of-state, or to Canada-- that's easier said than done. Our families are here. Our jobs and home are here. Our life is here. Besides, Canada's not exactly welcoming immigrants with open arms.


    My attorney friend here in Orlando is suggesting to his clients (that bring this question up) they should do the very same thing you have done.

    It is a bit of a stretch, however, I am hopeful we can have our anti-gay marriage law here in Florida struck down. First, we need a new Governor, which is a lock for 2014. It's possible voters will get to repeal this law in November of 2016, if the decision to yea or nay same sex marriage comes down to each state.

    We're not holding our breath on a repeal here. We have a sympathetic Democratic governor, but conservative super majorities in both legislative houses, and besides, Missouri has a constitutional amendment forbidding marriage equality, so we're pretty much doomed until it's struck down at the federal level. If the Supreme Court votes to uphold DOMA, then I doubt we'll ever have it here.