Dirt may explain why richest countries suffer diseases rarely seen anywhere else

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 23, 2013 3:27 PM GMT
    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/The-Unintended-and-Deadly-Consequences-of-Living-in-the-Industrialized-World-199164051.html
  • Lukehiker

    Posts: 161

    Mar 23, 2013 5:29 PM GMT
    This is something that has been taking a hold in the American Medical community very slowly; both because of prejudice against new ideas and because of tradition.

    There is also the logical error many doctors make in the assumption that all germs are bad.

    Ever seen one of those toothpaste commercials where they show the bacterial in your mouth?
    Or those Listerine commercials where they claim to kill 99.9% of bacterial?

    Odds are, the bacterial in both cases is GOOD bacterial, and killing it off is what is leading you to need such products in the first place.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Mar 23, 2013 5:34 PM GMT
    Dirty
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Mar 24, 2013 8:11 AM GMT
    Wake up your Nona and ask her. She'll tell you eating dirt is part of being alive. We're so sterilized now that monkey viruses take us away in droves.
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    Mar 26, 2013 10:46 AM GMT
    Lukehiker saidThis is something that has been taking a hold in the American Medical community very slowly; both because of prejudice against new ideas and because of tradition.


    I think it might be a generational thing, most people in medical school now are pretty comfortable with this idea as it is taught as one of the most compelling theories for the skyrocketing rate of autoimmune diseases.
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    Apr 03, 2013 11:39 PM GMT
    Lukehiker saidThis is something that has been taking a hold in the American Medical community very slowly; both because of prejudice against new ideas and because of tradition.

    There is also the logical error many doctors make in the assumption that all germs are bad.

    Ever seen one of those toothpaste commercials where they show the bacterial in your mouth?
    Or those Listerine commercials where they claim to kill 99.9% of bacterial?

    Odds are, the bacterial in both cases is GOOD bacterial, and killing it off is what is leading you to need such products in the first place.


    Actually any bacteria that colonizes in the mouth consumes the sugar from the starch that's been broken down into glucose by amylase, or plain sugar that you eat. When it converts the sugar into usable energy, it releases acid as a by-product. This acid is what causes demineralization and inevitably tooth decay.

    While there are many other reasons for more developed nations suffering from more serious outbreaks, a main contributor is antibiotics. When someone has a bacterial infection, and is prescribed an antibiotic, most of the bacteria in your body will be killed - good and bad bacteria included. The bacteria that isn't killed most likely has a mutation that renders them resistant to that antibiotic. Now, the only bad bacteria that are left living are those that have better genetics than those that were killed. In other words, the bacteria that have a resistance to the antibiotic have remained living and continue to thrive due to natural selection. These bacteria are most commonly referred to as super bugs. This is why you need to make sure you only are prescribed antibiotics when they are absolutely necessary, it's astounding how many doctors prescribe antibiotics for viral infections!

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    Apr 05, 2013 1:00 PM GMT
    Yup that's what you get when you isolate your kids from their environment to prevent them from getting sick, you fuck up their immune system for good.
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    Apr 05, 2013 1:28 PM GMT
    Loving the idea that dirt has anything to do with type1 diabetes. If he had looked at the diets of the two groups he might have found that Finnish kids have much more access to foods the Russian kids didn't, in cases of Type2.

    I wonder if kids would develop immunity to MRSA if repeatedly exposed to it? Who's willing to risk their kids in this grand experiment?

    In 1958, at 3, I cut my knee. It got a small bandaid as treatment. I loved dirt, even ate it sometimes, lol, and used to play in it. I caught a bacteria and ended up with osteo myelitis.

    They thought they'd have to cut off the leg mid-thigh. However, they decided to try a very early form of Erythromycin. Ghastly stuff that was so sour tasting and off that for years the smell of scalloped potatoes made me very nauseous.

    The answer is down the middle, not a black or white stance.

    Something else not even mentioned is dentistry etc. Three days of antibiotics is just enough to perhaps knock out a bacteria the dentist is worried about before, let's say, an extraction, but only 3 days is not enough to kill off a slew of other bad bacteria in your body that your body normally has good bacteria keeping in check. That good bacteria also gets weakened with 3 days of drugs.
    Meanwhile bad bacteria, having only gotten enough of a dose to hinder it, develops a nice resistance to that brief dose of antibiotic.
    A few Docs I know, and myself, feel that underprescribing antibiotics in this manner is as bad as overprescribing.