The county where no one's gay

  • metta

    Posts: 39169

    Mar 25, 2013 5:38 AM GMT
    The county where no one's gay

    http://www.cnn.com/2013/03/24/opinion/sutter-franklin-county-mississippi-lgbt/index.html


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    Mar 25, 2013 1:01 PM GMT
    Thank god I don't live in the south!
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    Mar 25, 2013 1:12 PM GMT
    I live in the south
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    Mar 25, 2013 1:14 PM GMT
    Guess we are back to the age of purple prose. Sheesh; that was almost unreadable.
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    Mar 25, 2013 1:20 PM GMT
    As if this is a surprise being that the focus is a small town in the South.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    Mar 25, 2013 1:48 PM GMT
    It's not true of all the South. About an hour away from this dead place is New Orleans. One of the best gay cities in The world.
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    Mar 25, 2013 2:04 PM GMT
    That was really interesting to watch. Thanks for posting it.

    I'm always shocked when I see some of these places that seem sorta untouched by the modern/progressive world. Makes me appreciate living where I do.
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    Mar 25, 2013 2:45 PM GMT
    The south never fails to represent us all, oh so well.

    I shudder to think about living in those boondocks of ignorance.
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    Mar 25, 2013 2:56 PM GMT
    ...at least, not openly...
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    Mar 25, 2013 3:17 PM GMT
    calguy456 saidThank god I don't live in the south!



    Some of the most Liberal cities in the nation are in the South. Generalizing an entire region based off a small town in Mississippi makes now sense. Ever been to any small towns in upstate New York? Yikes.
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Mar 25, 2013 3:35 PM GMT
    This is very much the way it was when I was growing up in southern Indiana in the 1950s/60s. A few small, rural communities in a farming county. Culturally it was almost identical to this. Simple minded, family oriented, a place where everyone knew everyone's business (more or less), where there might be suspicions but they were seldom voiced. Such things just weren't talked about.

    Take the country prosecuting attorney (male) who was engaged (for years) to a high school English teacher (female). Both were well respected in the community and fairly well known. They chose to hide their sexuality by presenting themselves publicly as a couple but secretly both were gay. The attorney was murdered by a trick but the above-ground story was he was murdered and robbed by a hitch hiker.

    Or take the man who ran a small printing company with his wife, his mother, his sister, an adopted son who had been a foster child, and me. It was a very sick situation and I had no idea when I began working there just what was going on. But eventually it became clear to me that the man had been sexually abusing the boy for years and was madly 'in love' with him. The boy (an older teenager by the time I came into this) wasn't gay (so far as I could tell) but was very emotionally manipulated and conflicted. He was also very angry, self abusive (as well as 'other' abusive), acting out his rage. The mother, wife and sister 'knew' what was going on but they were all in denial about it and simply, psychologically and culturally, were ill equipped to know how to deal with it. During the year I worked there, there were several instances where the whole situation threatened to blow up to the point it would become a public scandal. It was a severely dysfunctional family system BUT one the county prosecuting attorney mentioned previously knew about. Years later the man involved in all this would die of HIV although, of course, that was never admitted by the family. I have no idea what became of the boy.

    These are just two examples (and there are others) of what the repression of homosexuality does to a society. It literally kills people, destroys families and makes people sick. Then everyone in denial wonders "what went wrong." icon_rolleyes.gif
  • TroyAthlete

    Posts: 4269

    Mar 25, 2013 4:21 PM GMT
    I love how people like to pretend like it's all in the South. There are hate groups all over the map. Certainly there's pockets of deep, deep backwards beliefs in the South, but the casual and clueless intolerance I've encountered in California is no less bad -- directed towards gays, women, Latinos, blacks, whites, Republicans (haha), you name it.

    The shabby ways gays of color are treated in our gay media across the country, for example, has nothing to do with the South. It may be more benign in its methods, but let's not fool ourselves: West Hollywood is as racist as ANY place in the South. Utah is as homophobic as any Southern state, if not more so. I once dated seriously a non-black guy who dropped an n-bomb on me in an argument (have not communicated with him since that moment, btw) -- he grew up thousands of miles away from the South.

    One of the most annoying things about my liberal friends is how they fool themselves into thinking they are immune from practicing intolerance because they didn't grow up in "the South." Who are they fooling?

    http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/hate-map#s=ID

    That a link to the SPLC's map tracking active hate groups in the US. 51 in Jersey. 87 in Cali. Hmmm...
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Mar 25, 2013 4:33 PM GMT
    You're right, TA, it isn't just "the south".
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    Mar 25, 2013 4:55 PM GMT
    It should really be: "The county where no one is openly gay"
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Mar 25, 2013 4:59 PM GMT
    I saw the story on CNN.com. Very interesting and certainly sad.

    icon_mad.gif
  • SomeSiciliano...

    Posts: 543

    Mar 25, 2013 7:14 PM GMT
    RadRTT saidIt should really be: "The county where no one is openly gay"


    hahaha...you beat me to it. icon_biggrin.gif

    I'm sure a few people pack their kneepads when they take roadies to New Orleans or Atlanta icon_rolleyes.gif
  • imbrad

    Posts: 377

    Mar 25, 2013 7:31 PM GMT
    It's so good to be reminded of the state of rights in different places. I actually just talked to a canadian friend today about his views against equal marriage. It's everywhere. The difference between Denver and Colorado Springs (one hour drive) can be shocking! Ultimately, if we build stronger communities, honesty will win.
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    Mar 25, 2013 7:32 PM GMT
    dayumm said...at least, not openly...


    I was thinking the same thing. Yes, there is, they just haven't told any of their neighbors.
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    Mar 25, 2013 7:44 PM GMT
    I'm from a small town in Tennessee. Quite a few gay students but of course it wasn't talked about. I came out in the 11th grade. You can imagine what life was like after that.
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    Mar 25, 2013 7:49 PM GMT
    The county where no ones gay. . . But, everyone iso n Grindr. . . icon_eek.gif
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    Mar 25, 2013 7:54 PM GMT
    And the livestock are incredibly nervous....
  • captaindave4

    Posts: 66

    Mar 25, 2013 8:33 PM GMT
    running11 saidThe south never fails to represent us all, oh so well.

    I shudder to think about living in those boondocks of ignorance.


    The rural midwest is comparable, buddy. Ignorance and homophobia certainly aren't distinctly southern problems.
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    Mar 25, 2013 8:48 PM GMT
    'Dorothy Creech, a 74-year-old woman who lives in a big white house with two rocking chairs on the porch, said she never has encountered a gay person in the flesh, but she wouldn't be bothered by it if she did, partly because she loves "The Ellen DeGeneres Show."'

    I think this says a lot about the importance of positive gay role models in the media.
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    Mar 25, 2013 9:43 PM GMT
    There is something about the south that is slowly changing the overall mind set of homosexuality. Even though it's a slow process, it is happening.

    I think the only parts of the south that do have a hard time accepting the gay community are these little "po-dunk" towns across the south that are closed off from the rest of the US and society. Is it their fault that they are closed off? Yes and no and it can go both ways.

    Great video and cover story from CNN and the reporter. (He's kinda cute too) icon_smile.gif
    Thanks for posting

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    Mar 25, 2013 9:56 PM GMT
    But one knows a Bona fide homosexual from there.

    Grateful I have been one of those brave people my whole life.