Puppy Training

  • GraphicGuy

    Posts: 115

    Mar 27, 2013 12:37 PM GMT
    I've got a very cute new companion coming next week and i'm wondering about doing Clicker training. Did anyone train their Dog this way and did they find it better than traditional vocal training? or any tips.

    Nikki.jpg

    Nikki is an Aussie Shepherd Pup

    Thanks
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 27, 2013 1:53 PM GMT
    Oh Man! She's a sweetheart!!

    I haven't heard too much about the Clicker training technique but it sounds like a gentler alternative to aggressive, verbal commands.

    I found the book " The Loved Dog" by Tamar Geller to be very useful, implements mostly non-verbal commands and generally a kinder approach to training our loved ones.
    the_loved_dog:_the_gentle_way_to_teach_y

    Enjoy many happy years with Nikki!
  • GraphicGuy

    Posts: 115

    Mar 27, 2013 2:26 PM GMT
    I have been watching lots of Youtube videos on it. Pretty amazing the speed they learn at.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 27, 2013 3:13 PM GMT
    I believe that's a very smart breed, she should learn quickly. I don't know about the clicker method, but when I took my dogs for obedience training the thing they stressed about verbal commands was simplicity and consistency.

    Most commands should be 1 or 2 words of few syllables, and not buried with a lot of other inconsistent sentence structure that can confuse the dog. For instance:

    "NIKKI, COME!" rather than "HeyNikkicomeonoverherewillyougirl?" Imagine yourself listening to someone speaking an unknown foreign language quickly, where you can't distinguish one word from another, the sound all runs together.
  • melloyello

    Posts: 149

    Mar 28, 2013 12:44 AM GMT
    I've trained 2 dogs with "clicker" training the old fashioned way: i.e. snaps. My poodle was remarkably intelligent; she knew the difference between "shake" and "give me five." She'd also let you know when she wanted to go outside. My labrador, while not quire as well versed, will sit then single bark when she wants to go out or if shes laying down (at 13, most of the time) and you ask her "want to go out?" she'll jump up and head to the door.

    We reserve the snap for "focusing" the dog on going out. Like if we're outside and shes chasing squirrels, if I snap she'll stop and do her business before anything else.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 28, 2013 12:57 AM GMT
    I don't have any experience with clicker training.

    Australian Shepherds are a very smart and active breed. They were bred to work on farms for long hours. You will need to give your new puppy plenty of exercise if you want her to be calm enough to accept training. You can make training part of her exercise as well.

    I agree that training is usually easier than you'd think if you are very consistent and use simple commands. An easy way is to use words each time you do something. For example, when I walked my dog, each time we'd come to street crossing, I'd say stop as we came to a halt. In no time, my dog picked up on what "stop" meant, and she'd freeze any time I said stop. I didn't have to do training exercises or anything. She learned a lot of words like upstairs, downstairs, your food, and your bed without me really doing much work. The only trick was to use those words constantly and consistently.

    My dog was a Great Pyrenees, a breed known for being stubborn and hard to train. They are livestock guardians who were bred to watch over animals by themselves rather than to take orders from humans. I had her so well trained that she could run around off her leash, something I was told was impossible with GPs. (I only allowed her to do this in certain very safe places.) She understood a decent number of words and was very well behaved.

    Hope this helps. Good luck with your new puppy!
  • GraphicGuy

    Posts: 115

    Mar 28, 2013 1:14 AM GMT
    DudeInNOVA saidI don't have any experience with clicker training.

    Australian Shepherds are a very smart and active breed. They were bred to work on farms for long hours. You will need to give your new puppy plenty of exercise if you want her to be calm enough to accept training. You can make training part of her exercise as well.

    I agree that training is usually easier than you'd think if you are very consistent and use simple commands. An easy way is to use words each time you do something. For example, when I walked my dog, each time we'd come to street crossing, I'd say stop as we came to a halt. In no time, my dog picked up on what "stop" meant, and she'd freeze any time I said stop. I didn't have to do training exercises or anything. She learned a lot of words like upstairs, downstairs, your food, and your bed without me really doing much work. The only trick was to use those words constantly and consistently.

    My dog was a Great Pyrenees, a breed known for being stubborn and hard to train. They are livestock guardians who were bred to watch over animals by themselves rather than to take orders from humans. I had her so well trained that she could run around off her leash, something I was told was impossible with GPs. (I only allowed her to do this in certain very safe places.) She understood a decent number of words and was very well behaved.

    Hope this helps. Good luck with your new puppy!



    Thank you.

    My last dog was a Chow Chow, Great great companion but she did as she pleased most of the time, mainly look stately ;-) . So want to make sure I properly train Nikki.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 28, 2013 1:18 AM GMT
    GraphicGuy saidThank you.

    My last dog was a Chow Chow, Great great companion but she did as she pleased most of the time, mainly look stately ;-) . So want to make sure I properly train Nikki.

    Chow Chows are a stubborn breed. You should have a MUCH easier time training Nikki. That's a very smart breed. The eagerness to follow commands is literally built into them. Start early and focus her intelligence and energy before she turns destructive and disobedient. Don't worry too much about it. The fact that you're doing your "homework" ahead of time is a very good sign. A lot of people are lazy, and then they wonder why their dogs turn into such terrors.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Mar 28, 2013 1:37 AM GMT
    Like DIN said, you are going to have a very active dog and Nikki will need lots of exercise. I had a friend who tried to have an Australian Shepherd as a house dog and poor pup had a hard time doing all that nothing.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 28, 2013 1:50 AM GMT
    Aww. I want a dog now. icon_neutral.gif
  • monstapex

    Posts: 477

    Mar 28, 2013 6:03 AM GMT
    691917-rolled-up-newspaper-in-a-closed-f
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 28, 2013 6:04 AM GMT
    That pup is beautiful!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 28, 2013 9:16 AM GMT
    Such a cute puppy!

    No. I did not do Clicker because I didn't want my dogs responding to any idiot with a clicker.
    My dogs learned from positive reinforcement with vocal commands and hand cues.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 28, 2013 4:59 PM GMT
    monstapex said691917-rolled-up-newspaper-in-a-closed-f



    ...Hitting an animal is no training icon_sad.gif
  • thegaymessiah

    Posts: 214

    Mar 28, 2013 6:10 PM GMT
    my brain went to a dirty place. like 'can i be your puppy too sir' porno place.

    sorry. =p
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 29, 2013 1:28 AM GMT
    repitition. don't give in! discipline! make them walk next to you all the time -- it'll teach them to listen to you know matter what.