Yoga Body: The Origins of Modern Posture Practice [Mark Singleton]

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    Mar 29, 2013 1:00 AM GMT
    http://brihaspati.net/downloads/Yoga_Body_Mark_Singleton.pdf

    The author's intention was not to explode the myths and hagiographies of hatha yoga, but he definitely has.

    (I was told, as many people are, that Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga was a revived tradition, five-thousand years old, based on an ancient text called the Yoga Korunta, and the Vedas.)

    Putting that discipline within the context of worldwide developments in physical culture makes greater sense, and makes it ever more fascinating.

    Singleton investigates and arrives at some highly plausible theories as to the origins of current styles of hatha yoga, and how they were received and were influenced by pre-existing western gymnastic systems and esoteric movements.





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    Mar 30, 2013 4:27 PM GMT
    these asian traditions are only "5000 years old" as it sells better to whites.


    icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Mar 30, 2013 10:27 PM GMT
    GonzoTheGreat saidthese asian traditions are only "5000 years old" as it sells better to whites.


    icon_rolleyes.gif


    There were yogins and fakirs, but they were not respectable, and they and their practises were regarded as heretical and polluting by orthodox Hindus.

    The hagiographies were probably created for Indian consumption as much as for anyone else. Hatha yoga's reputation needed to be cleaned up in order to be respected. Yogis in general were hostile towards it, as it was practised by bands of dangerous outcasts.

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    Mar 31, 2013 4:17 PM GMT
    yeah yeah, I read the book.
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    Apr 12, 2013 5:59 PM GMT
    Unintended saidCan he suck his wilie?


    Dude you´re 37. And you can´t even spell. icon_confused.gif
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    Apr 12, 2013 6:20 PM GMT
    Wish I had more time so I could read the entire PDF.

    I was always taught that prior to the Pradipika, there weren't many Asanas at all. That Krishnamacharya expounded them and then his disciples disseminated them. Obviously in that crystallized chronology, there are many pieces missing.

    If this is something that interests you, I'd check out Eric Shaw- Yoga Historian.
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    Apr 14, 2013 9:46 PM GMT
    Yogi567 saidWish I had more time so I could read the entire PDF.

    I was always taught that prior to the Pradipika, there weren't many Asanas at all. That Krishnamacharya expounded them and then his disciples disseminated them. Obviously in that crystallized chronology, there are many pieces missing.

    If this is something that interests you, I'd check out Eric Shaw- Yoga Historian.


    "always"? That could have been Sjoman´s work... There was definitely a shift to more gymnastic postures in the c20, though there has always been a body yoga....
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    May 04, 2013 12:06 PM GMT
    Fortis said
    GonzoTheGreat saidthese asian traditions are only "5000 years old" as it sells better to whites.


    icon_rolleyes.gif


    There were yogins and fakirs, but they were not respectable, and they and their practises were regarded as heretical and polluting by orthodox Hindus.

    The hagiographies were probably created for Indian consumption as much as for anyone else. Hatha yoga's reputation needed to be cleaned up in order to be respected. Yogis in general were hostile towards it, as it was practised by bands of dangerous outcasts.



    "Orthodox Hindus" have always hated any outside power structure because the brahmin's (who run the show) livelihoods rely on the temple worship structure. Though its worth noting that there really isnt such a thing as "orthodox" in Hinduism since the practice varies so much depending on where you are in India. If you read some of the earlier texts you can see a division from the very beginning of whether God even exists as separate from man. Fascinating family of religions icon_smile.gif