Maintaining weight loss after reaching your goal

  • JimJim

    Posts: 58

    Mar 30, 2013 4:39 AM GMT
    I need advice on how to maintain weight loss after reaching your goal. In the past couple of years I've managed to reach my ideal weight and feel good about myself twice now, and both times I've wound up regaining all the weight within a couple of months.

    My problem is that I tend to burn out. I'll exercise regularly and eat right for several months and get into a routine but then at some point down the road something in my brain goes off and I start thinking to myself "in order to maintain this progress I have to keep this up forever."

    I always hear from people that eventually your body gets used to exercising and eating healthy and that if you keep it up for long enough it'll start to feel like second nature. But this doesn't happen to me. Even after multiple months of eating right and exercising, I would still have to force myself to go to the gym as if it were day one. It never became something enjoyable.

    So how do I get around this problem? I want to try one more time, hoping that the third time around will be the charm. But I'm worried about falling into the same trap as the first two times. How can I make exercise and eating right feel natural instead of something I have to consistently fight to do.
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    Mar 30, 2013 5:20 AM GMT
    EXERCISE ISN'T LIMITED TO A GYM! Find some activity you enjoy biking, rock climbing, hockey, rollerblading, dancing....etc and do it regularly. turn off the tv, turn off the computer, and go DO something, just walk!

    variety in foods is essential to beat boredom, just like exercise......new twists on old stuff helps or look at other cultures for inspiration......learn your nutrional needs and improvise from there. also east smaller meals. more times a day. like 6x a day....to get in 1800 calories or whatever and the proportions of carbs, fats, proteins, water.......simple foods, not processed........don't forbid anything foodwise, just be smart about timing and portion control. when you deny yourself a favored anything , it becomes a craving..... diest dont work, they are temporary, a lifestyle is just that life long. small incremental steps of change over time are big changes....
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    Mar 30, 2013 8:14 AM GMT
    March 31st 2013 will be the one year anniversary of my completing a 90 pound weight loss. Since then I have managed to keep my weight stable plus or minus four pounds. I would be lying if I said it has not been difficult, but it is so much easier now then when I first started.

    Key points for me were:
    - Get into shape. Push yourself hard until you are fit enough that exercise honestly does not seem like a chore. I know you said that this doesn't happen for you, and for a long time it seemed like it wouldn't for me either. In the end, however, I got there. Probably took about 10 months, but if I did it it is definitely possible for you to do so as well.
    - Let yourself take breaks. If ever there was a day where I was just sick of exercise and couldn't hack it, I just let myself relax for a day (or a few days). Then I made sure I got right back to exercise again. Take the time you need, but be clear in your own mind that the purpose of the breaks is so that you can return to exercise again not so that you can abandon it entirely.
    - Monitor your diet. What goes in your mouth can easily undo any and all exercise you do if you are looking to maintain your weight. This does NOT mean that you should continually diet. It just means you should try to be aware of portion size etc.
    - Tell other people. Make sure that they understand what is going on in your life and what it means to you. When you subsequently tell them you'd rather not order the extra large pizza you won't have to explain why. They might even wanna exercise with you instead of your regular hangout!
    - Monitor your weight. That doesn't mean you have to weigh in every day, but try to remember to do it regularly (weekly?) That way you won't be able to kid yourself if the pounds start to reappear.

    I still struggle sometimes to do the right thing for my body, but this is what has worked so far. Best of luck!!!
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    Mar 31, 2013 12:09 AM GMT
    bioc458 saidMarch 31st 2013 will be the one year anniversary of my completing a 90 pound weight loss. Since then I have managed to keep my weight stable plus or minus four pounds. I would be lying if I said it has not been difficult, but it is so much easier now then when I first started.

    Key points for me were:
    - Get into shape. Push yourself hard until you are fit enough that exercise honestly does not seem like a chore. I know you said that this doesn't happen for you, and for a long time it seemed like it wouldn't for me either. In the end, however, I got there. Probably took about 10 months, but if I did it it is definitely possible for you to do so as well.
    - Let yourself take breaks. If ever there was a day where I was just sick of exercise and couldn't hack it, I just let myself relax for a day (or a few days). Then I made sure I got right back to exercise again. Take the time you need, but be clear in your own mind that the purpose of the breaks is so that you can return to exercise again not so that you can abandon it entirely.
    - Monitor your diet. What goes in your mouth can easily undo any and all exercise you do if you are looking to maintain your weight. This does NOT mean that you should continually diet. It just means you should try to be aware of portion size etc.
    - Tell other people. Make sure that they understand what is going on in your life and what it means to you. When you subsequently tell them you'd rather not order the extra large pizza you won't have to explain why. They might even wanna exercise with you instead of your regular hangout!
    - Monitor your weight. That doesn't mean you have to weigh in every day, but try to remember to do it regularly (weekly?) That way you won't be able to kid yourself if the pounds start to reappear.

    I still struggle sometimes to do the right thing for my body, but this is what has worked so far. Best of luck!!!


    CONGRATULATIONS!!!
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Mar 31, 2013 12:15 AM GMT
    You're probably a rediculously hot guy who has self esteem issues, like I did.

    I am way old and have a really hot 24 year old muscular bf now. I just accepted that I wasn't perfect, and there he was.
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    Mar 31, 2013 1:07 AM GMT
    barriehomeboy saidYou're probably a rediculously hot guy who has self esteem issues, like I did.

    I am way old and have a really hot 24 year old muscular bf now. I just accepted that I wasn't perfect, and there he was.


    Dude.. 48 isn't way old.

    OP: If you find yourself burning out, try a longer term smaller goal - it sounds like the exercise and diet you're using may be too extreme for you.

    Having said that, a healthy lifestyle requires some discipline - you have to chose to eat healthy most of the time, exercise in some form daily or almost daily... but it doesnt have to be torture for the rest of your life.

    Incorporate some less strict days into your routine, some 'cheat' days where you can relax your eating, some days where the exercise is a fun activity (swimming or a team sport etc?)

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    Mar 31, 2013 1:33 AM GMT
    Like other people said try other activities such as group activities or classes.

    All you need sometimes is a change in your routine. I've just started a kickboxing class and I find that it works parts of my body that I thought were already fit. Your body does get use to the stress you add to it. That's what its supposed to do so spice it up and change up your routine.
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    Mar 31, 2013 1:57 AM GMT
    Taking weight off is hard. Keeping it off is harder. Fact of life. Many Americans, if they keep at it, lose weight, but put it back on. You are not alone.

    I lost significant weight, about 35 pounds, and have kept it off for years. I found that the key to keeping it off was:

    1. Weighing myself everyday. Yeah, I know it sounds neurotic and weight isn't the be all and end all and some people object to this, but I found that this has been essential. Doing so, I find that as soon as I was about two or three pounds above my target weight, I knew I was doing something wrong. Either I was eating too much, eating the wrong stuff, or exercising too little. Moreover, even though I have kept my weight off for years, I still weigh myself every morning. Of course, if you are adding a lot of muscle, your weight will go up, but this is good. See my next point.

    2. I've learned that it is important to do weight lifting or strength training to maintain a healthy weight. Historically, I have been very good at doing cardio, but I have learned that weight lifting or strength training is essential. It reduces your body fat and increases your muscle mass. This is good. Muscle, even at rest, requires calories, whereas fat cells do not. Be sure to include weight lifting or strength training in your program. When I am on a fairly challenging weight lifting or strength training routine, I can eat significantly more, but I don't put weight on. In fact, if I don't eat significantly more (especially protein), I lose weight and at my current weight this is not good.

    3. While losing weight and, to a lesser degree, maintaining weight, I found that a food diary was helpful. Every day I listed what I ate and the approximate caloric content. Since then, I have learned that caloric content is not the be all and end all, but it did help me at the time. Today, I now know that that all calories are not equal. For example, refined sugar and white flour are bad news; protein and complex carbohydrates, e.g., whole wheat flour, are good news. The important thing is that keeping a food diary forces you to pay attention to what you are eating everyday.

    I hope this helps.