Melancholia

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    Oct 15, 2008 6:34 AM GMT
    Is it the same as depression? One of my special friends has this problem where he feels sad but not depressed.
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    Oct 15, 2008 7:05 AM GMT
    that is the old name for BiPolar If you are from Western Ireland or your ancestors are lots of it
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    Oct 15, 2008 8:58 AM GMT
    The Mood Cure: The 4-Step Program to Take Charge of Your Emotions--Today, by Julia Ross

    From Publishers Weekly
    Ross, author of The Diet Cure, here offers a prescriptive plan designed to relieve a variety of ailments from seasonal disorders, stress, irritability and depression. Ross believes that many of these annoying and, in some cases, severely disabling disorders can be relieved through a change in diet and nutritional supplements. Readers are asked to first determine which of four "false moods" they suffer from: a dark cloud, blahs, stress or too much sensitivity. The survey is simple and the questions will immediately resonate with readers: for example, someone who is suffering from the blahs is likely to have difficulty focusing or require a great deal of sleep. Armed with their survey scores, readers can then turn to the appropriate chapter to learn which diets and supplements will be most helpful. Particularly reassuring are the author's detailed explanations of why she advises a particular strategy. While Ross is an advocate for nutritional supplements, she provides a sound overview for all her recommendations

    I was from her book The Diet Cure that I learned about GABA (gamma-amino butyric acid) which was so extremely effective for me during my cancer treatment depression. Without the GABA, the antidepressants the dr gave me were next to useless. In combination, I felt great relief. I now use GABA to stabilize my mood when I am down, anxious, or can't sleep. It is a very subtle change that comes over you about 20 - 30 minutes after taking a tablet of GABA GABA is the brain's natural neurochemical for regulating mood and sleep.

    mood_cure.jpg
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    Oct 15, 2008 12:39 PM GMT
    redheadguy saidIs it the same as depression? One of my special friends has this problem where he feels sad but not depressed.


    Not at all the same problem. To me a certain amount of melancholia is almost a given in life (unless you are able to totally ignore most of what goes on around you or to you), especially as you get older. Depression is often very destructive, melancholia is a reasonable reaction to some of one's life experiences.
  • zakariahzol

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    Oct 15, 2008 12:51 PM GMT
    I told my friend in Canada about this problem of mine. Sometimes I feel sad and melancholy and I dont know why. Probably is due to the fact I live alone with no one to talk too. How I wish I have someone to share my problem, listening to what I have to say or simply holding my hand. It really depressing to be coming home to an empty house every night. Being secretly gay make it more difficult. That mean I can only share my true feeling to a few selected gay friend and I dont have that many to begin with.
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    Oct 15, 2008 1:46 PM GMT
    redheadguy saidIs it the same as depression? One of my special friends has this problem where he feels sad but not depressed.


    Your friend might just be playing with words. He could not want to admit his own depression or he might be disguising it with a different name. If it is persistent or reoccurring he should speak to a councilor. If he isn't depressed they could give him some cognitive strategies to deal with it.

    Best of luck to your friend.
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    Oct 15, 2008 1:52 PM GMT
    redheadguy saidIs it the same as depression? One of my special friends has this problem where he feels sad but not depressed.

    Is your friend "special" like Palin's son, Trig, is "special"?
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    Oct 15, 2008 6:09 PM GMT
    No, Caslon, he is special in that he shares my bed every now and again.

    Personally, I think he's a bit of a hypochondriac and I think he just needs a bit more special loving from his special friend redheadguy.
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    Oct 15, 2008 6:18 PM GMT
    redheadguy saidNo, Caslon, he is special in that he shares my bed every now and again.

    Personally, I think he's a bit of a hypochondriac and I think he just needs a bit more special loving from his special friend redheadguy.

    oh, that oughta fix him up .... icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Oct 15, 2008 7:11 PM GMT
    I've been woebegone all my life; but I am never, have never been, depressed. Sadness, in all of it various shades, is just part of my nature. It's not something that haunts me, and I'm never overtly sullen around my companions -- because showing overt emotion to anyone in public is bad form of course, as everyone knows... I don't care for forlorn music, books, movies -- I find all of this incredibly treacly & irritating. But I do sort of absorb and interpret the world through a gloomy lens. I just perfuse it with a lot of absurd humor to cut the sting. Goes down better.

    (Sometimes I wonder if it had anything to do with growing up in a place with constant wind, long winters, wild landscape and storms.)

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    Oct 15, 2008 7:26 PM GMT
    Wasn't Melancholia the sister to Morticia Addams?
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    Oct 15, 2008 10:53 PM GMT
    SurrealLife saidNot at all the same problem.


    Actually, in early psychological diagnosis, the term "melancholia" was in fact used precisely to mean what we now call depression.

    I have a certain fondness for some of the quainter terms. The early term for what we call "schizophrenia" was "dementia praecox". It sounds more interesting somehow.
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    Oct 15, 2008 11:50 PM GMT
    jprichva said
    SurrealLife saidNot at all the same problem.


    Actually, in early psychological diagnosis, the term "melancholia" was in fact used precisely to mean what we now call depression.

    I have a certain fondness for some of the quainter terms. The early term for what we call "schizophrenia" was "dementia praecox". It sounds more interesting somehow.


    Yes that is true. I went to wikipedia to do some basic research.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melancholia

    My dad had a copy of Burton's "The Anatomy of Melancholy" which he actually read at one point (he had a very catholic taste in books).

    I associate the word "depression" with serious clinical depression. Thoughts of worthlessness, self-destructive fantasies, very low energy, etc.. To me sadness and melancholy are synonymous. Listening to some Brahm's pieces I can sense the underlying sadness or melancholy, but I don't find the music depressing.

    In the Victorian and Edwardian ages people were not said to be depressed but had a "nervous disorder" or suffered from "nerves." I doubt if the word depression became commonly used until the 20th century.
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    Oct 16, 2008 1:08 AM GMT
    It has been a while since I read it, but in "Mourning and Melancholia," Freud distinguishes between mourning as the normal process of recovering from the loss of a beloved object (gradually you invest the energy that would have gone into the lost person or thing into new persons or things), and melancholia as the neurotic version of this, in which the patient doesn't recover from the loss, but gets "stuck" and fixated on the loss.

    It just sounds to me like your friend is kind of fancy, and has refined sensibilities. I would prescribe the rest cure. It doesn't sound like your bed is a particularly good place for him to get any rest, however.
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    Oct 16, 2008 1:56 AM GMT
    jprichva said
    SurrealLife saidNot at all the same problem.


    Actually, in early psychological diagnosis, the term "melancholia" was in fact used precisely to mean what we now call depression.

    I have a certain fondness for some of the quainter terms. The early term for what we call "schizophrenia" was "dementia praecox". It sounds more interesting somehow.



    Well actually, it would be called dysthymia (nervous depression was removed from the DSM). It is a less intense depression. Not quite the hopeless, lack of pleasure, no excitement in life kinda mood. With dysthymia you feel lower than average mood more days of the week than not. That, and if you are usually feeling this ways for extended periods of time (months and years) then I'd likely to call it more than just the blues.
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    Oct 16, 2008 11:12 PM GMT
    It's hard to say. "Melancholia" is phrase that has been around for a long time and it has been used to mean different things by different people at different times. My first hunch would be that your friend may suffer from dysthymia - a form of depression that is notable for low mood over a period of at least two years. It is generally considered less intense than major depression, but people with background dysthymia can be prone to major depressive episodes as well. Dysthymia is also considered a significant risk factor for suicide. Lifestyle changes, long term psychodynamic therapy, medication cognitive behavioral therapy and dialectical behavioral therapy all seem to help with dysthymia.