Scientists say oil industry likely caused largest Oklahoma earthquake

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 30, 2013 6:34 PM GMT
    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/energy/2013/03/130329-wastewater-injection-likely-caused-quake/

    The largest recorded earthquake in Oklahoma history was likely triggered by the injection of wastewater from oil production into wells deep beneath the earth, according to a study published Tuesday in the scientific journal Geology.

    The magnitude 5.7 earthquake, which struck in 2011 near Prague in central Oklahoma, is the largest and most recent of a number of quakes scientists have tied to wastewater injection from oil and natural gas production, raising new concerns about the practice.
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    Mar 31, 2013 12:06 AM GMT
    I lived thru this! my entire house shook -- I felt the wave go through it, and I lived about 70 miles away. had some minor structural damage. having never lived through an earthquake before, this was a pretty intense experience.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Mar 31, 2013 4:20 AM GMT
    HobokenHobo saidYou're joking right? I would recommend refreshing your environmental science knowledge before blindly believing the oil industry caused an earthquake. Perhaps check out jstore or ebscohost and use the Boolean search "earthquake" and "causes". This article is simply erroneous.


    I know, right? They could make sinkholes, but never earthquakes...
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Mar 31, 2013 4:25 AM GMT
    willular saidI lived thru this! my entire house shook -- I felt the wave go through it, and I lived about 70 miles away. had some minor structural damage. having never lived through an earthquake before, this was a pretty intense experience.


    I'm waiting for the fault line I'm on to shift. I'm right on the San Andreas fault line, which is expecting greater than a 9.0 when it goes. Some geologists are even projecting the largest earthquake ever to hit the globe.
  • O5vx

    Posts: 3154

    Mar 31, 2013 4:41 AM GMT
    Medjai said
    willular saidI lived thru this! my entire house shook -- I felt the wave go through it, and I lived about 70 miles away. had some minor structural damage. having never lived through an earthquake before, this was a pretty intense experience.


    I'm waiting for the fault line I'm on to shift. I'm right on the San Andreas fault line, which is expecting greater than a 9.0 when it goes. Some geologists are even projecting the largest earthquake ever to hit the globe.
    if I were you, I will be moving my stuff and getting the heck out of thereicon_smile.gif
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    Mar 31, 2013 4:43 AM GMT
    hmm...sounds both plausible and hard to believe!
    But who knows..."Truth is stranger than fiction"
    There may be some local factors effecting...like type of soil, minerals, depth of injection etc.,.
    Perhaps further research by a geologist can confirm.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Mar 31, 2013 5:16 AM GMT
    Harry7785 saidhmm...sounds both plausible and hard to believe!
    But who knows..."Truth is stranger than fiction"
    There may be some local factors effecting...like type of soil, minerals, depth of injection etc.,.
    Perhaps further research by a geologist can confirm.


    Earthquakes are caused by techtonic shifts. Soil and mineral types wouldn't really matter, and there is no way we could get to a dpeth that would matter. The continental crust ranges from 30-50km in thickness.
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    Mar 31, 2013 8:21 AM GMT
    I remember the night well. I lived in Lewisville, Texas (a 150 miles away from the earthquake, or more) until just about a year ago. It was mid evening, and the building started vibrating; then; the dishes; I said out loud, "Fuck, we're having an earthquake." I sat there at the kitchen table, and it shook pretty good...then..it was over.

    If you haven't seen the movie "Gasland" yet, it's a really good documentary on what oil fraccing is doing to the areas where it gets done. Nat Geo Magazine did an article on it last month, too.

    Since they've started fraccing here, we've had a number of quakes, but the one you are talking about was the most noticeable.

    I am not a geologist, and can't debate the science, but, I can tell you we rarely had earthquakes around here until they started fraccing.

    Note that the OK quake was centered, roughly, between three oil fraccing sites. That has appeared to be the case on more than one occasion and beyond just coincidence.

    Geologists would not be raising a flake here if it wasn't credible science.
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    Mar 31, 2013 2:21 PM GMT
    Medjai said
    Harry7785 said

    Earthquakes are caused by techtonic shifts. Soil and mineral types wouldn't really matter, and there is no way we could get to a dpeth that would matter. The continental crust ranges from 30-50km in thickness.


    Oh yes! soil really matters!
    I'm not a geologist but I know for sure that depending on the land (loose soil or hard rocks) the intensity of earthquake can be guessed.
    in loose soil, due to less friction the magnitude is often less...but when it comes to solid land...due to more friction, energy builds up in the form of tension and when it reaches its peak capacity...it releases all of its tension energy at once in form of giant earthquake.
    When it comes to minerals etc.,. due to injection of untreated chemical water (Who knows what are the contents) some minerals solidifies and some may dissolves...So, it may has a link!
    Yes, it is impossible at present to go at such a depth, but there are some other indirect ways...like Georadar, Some other non invasive techniques are there which I don't know their names...So far it is impossible but hopes are high for many geologists! :-)

    Note: When I say soil, I didn't meant soil under our feet, but soil deep inside earth's crust. I though some may think the other way...
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    Mar 31, 2013 9:01 PM GMT
    http://io9.com/oklahoma-s-strongest-earthquake-has-been-linked-to-the-461441953

    "After the 5.7 quake hit Prague, Oklahoma, it was followed by another 5.0 quake and thousands of aftershocks. Interestingly, the wastewater had been pumped into abandoned oil wells for 17 years without incident. The geologists speculate that, as the wastewater replenished compartments once filled with oil, the pressure to keep the water going down had to be increased. And as this pressure built up, the fault jumped; changes in water volumes deep underground reduced the stress on the rock, allowing the fault to slip. And in fact, this “Wilzetta Fault” was only 200 meters away from the active injection wells."
  • Whipmagic

    Posts: 1481

    Mar 31, 2013 9:26 PM GMT
    No! I thought it was gays and lesbians who caused earthquakes. We can't cede this power to the oil companies. At least we have to hold on to our ability to summon hurricanes.
  • Rhi_Bran

    Posts: 904

    Apr 01, 2013 2:08 AM GMT
    Harry7785 said
    Medjai said
    Harry7785 said

    Earthquakes are caused by techtonic shifts. Soil and mineral types wouldn't really matter, and there is no way we could get to a dpeth that would matter. The continental crust ranges from 30-50km in thickness.


    Oh yes! soil really matters!
    I'm not a geologist but I know for sure that depending on the land (loose soil or hard rocks) the intensity of earthquake can be guessed.
    in loose soil, due to less friction the magnitude is often less...but when it comes to solid land...due to more friction, energy builds up in the form of tension and when it reaches its peak capacity...it releases all of its tension energy at once in form of giant earthquake.
    When it comes to minerals etc.,. due to injection of untreated chemical water (Who knows what are the contents) some minerals solidifies and some may dissolves...So, it may has a link!
    Yes, it is impossible at present to go at such a depth, but there are some other indirect ways...like Georadar, Some other non invasive techniques are there which I don't know their names...So far it is impossible but hopes are high for many geologists! :-)

    Note: When I say soil, I didn't meant soil under our feet, but soil deep inside earth's crust. I though some may think the other way...


    While it is true that quake waves won't propagate through loose material as easily as they would through solid material, the hazard I think you really have in mind is the phenomenon known as liquefaction. If an earthquake of high enough magnitude occurs in an area overladen with loose relatively cohesionless material (like wet soil or loose sand), structures on top can be shifted downwards into the material. As an example, take a cup full of sand, place a small object on top of the sand, and then shake the cup from side to side vigorously. The object will eventually be swallowed up by the sand.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 01, 2013 2:39 AM GMT
    No one lives in Oklahoma.
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    Apr 01, 2013 6:57 AM GMT
    jack off to me on Skype stevenacciaroli1
  • Diplo

    Posts: 41

    Apr 01, 2013 7:17 AM GMT
    rickmenbashi saidNo one lives in Oklahoma.


    icon_surprised.gif Thank you..