My Podiatrist said I can't use the treadmill

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    Oct 15, 2008 3:58 PM GMT
    The treadmill was the only exercise I was interested in. Weights do absolutely nothing for me, couldn't care less about them. Give me a treadmill and a pair of headphones and you wouldn't hear from me for the rest of the day. When I was able to use the treadmill I was losing inches, my clothes were swimming on me. I looked better, felt better, walked better. So it's like the doctor informed me that the only positive in my life was completely unacceptable. Now that I can't use it I couldn't care less if I never stepped into a gym again. As a result I have gained about 20 pounds and am now considering gastric bypass surgery since I can't exercise anymore.
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    Oct 15, 2008 4:12 PM GMT
    Why did he nix the use of the treadmill? ...too much impact on your joints? ...how about using an elliptical?

    They have found that gastric bypass surgery cures diabettes instantly. From what I have seen of you on RJ, I would say go with the surgery. Nothing else agrees with you. Do it...get skinny....and get on with your life.
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    Oct 15, 2008 4:23 PM GMT
    Caslon7000 saidWhy did he nix the use of the treadmill? ...too much impact on your joints? ...how about using an elliptical?

    They have found that gastric bypass surgery cures diabettes instantly. From what I have seen of you on RJ, I would say go with the surgery. Nothing else agrees with you. Do it...get skinny....and get on with your life.


    Bad for my foot. The elliptical is difficult since I had a stroke.

    I also heard that about GB surgery. I'm not sure if my insurance will pay for it so I am looking into that.
  • Timbales

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    Oct 15, 2008 4:25 PM GMT
    Have you tried a stationary bike?
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    Oct 15, 2008 4:27 PM GMT
    Timberoo saidHave you tried a stationary bike?


    Again, because of my stroke I can't keep my right foot on the pedal.
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    Oct 15, 2008 4:32 PM GMT
    I have a friend who did the surgery, and has regretted it. His health has been bad ever since, and he can't eat the foods he once did. Everything has to be chopped up fine, and he's become anemic.

    But I know others are fine with the procedure. Do look into it fully, and get several opinions before you do it, so you know all the possible drawbacks.

    I would have recommended an elliptical machine, too, or some other low-impact aerobic machine. But if the elliptic is not suitable for you as a post-stroke patient, how were you doing the treadmill?

    Couldn't you do a mild routine on the elliptic, or on a stationary bike? You can dial those programs in, do one that's very easy. Doesn't your doctor think that NO exercise at all is also asking for trouble,too? Is swimming an option, and have you run that by your doc?
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    Oct 15, 2008 4:35 PM GMT
    NoNameGuy said
    Timberoo saidHave you tried a stationary bike?


    Again, because of my stroke I can't keep my right foot on the pedal.


    OIC, disregard part of my reply above. Although pedals can be equipped with straps, and your health center might be able to accommodate you there. I'm moderately disabled with arthritis, still bike on the road (with pedal clips), and swimming is one of my best ways to exercise.
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    Oct 15, 2008 4:39 PM GMT
    Red_Vespa saidI have a friend who did the surgery, and has regretted it. His health has been bad ever since, and he can't eat the foods he once did. Everything has to be chopped up fine, and he's become anemic.

    But I know others are fine with the procedure. Do look into it fully, and get several opinions before you do it, so you know all the possible drawbacks.

    I would have recommended an elliptical machine, too, or some other low-impact aerobic machine. But if the elliptic is not suitable for you as a post-stroke patient, how were you doing the treadmill?

    Couldn't you do a mild routine on the elliptic, or on a stationary bike? You can dial those programs in, do one that's very easy. Doesn't your doctor think that NO exercise at all is also asking for trouble,too? Is swimming an option, and have you run that by your doc?


    Treadmill is a flat surface, Elliptical requires knees and arms to move in sync with each other. I tried it but it was agony.
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    Oct 15, 2008 5:11 PM GMT
    NoNameGuy said
    Treadmill is a flat surface, Elliptical requires knees and arms to move in sync with each other. I tried it but it was agony.


    Don't do what hurts you, obviously. I've used some ellipticals that don't require you to pump with your arms, you can keep your hands on stationary rails if you prefer. But your right foot might still be an issue.

    These limitations may be moving you into physical therapy type equipment, but which some gyms also have. For instance, a hand crank machine, basically like a stationary bike only on a table, with hand grips instead of pedals. Even those in wheelchairs can use them, to let you get at least some aerobic exercise, within the heart rate limits allowed by your doctor.

    There are also rowing machines, in a number of different design configurations, involving some kind of pulling action with your arms and legs, but sitting down, of course. That would avoid any problems you may have with standing and balance, and lessen any issues with asymmetrical strength related to the stroke.

    Really hope something will work for you, since you may not be the best candidate for GBS, given your medical history. Has your doctor commented on that?
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    Oct 15, 2008 5:38 PM GMT
    Red_Vespa said
    NoNameGuy said
    Treadmill is a flat surface, Elliptical requires knees and arms to move in sync with each other. I tried it but it was agony.


    Don't do what hurts you, obviously. I've used some ellipticals that don't require you to pump with your arms, you can keep your hands on stationary rails if you prefer. But your right foot might still be an issue.

    These limitations may be moving you into physical therapy type equipment, but which some gyms also have. For instance, a hand crank machine, basically like a stationary bike only on a table, with hand grips instead of pedals. Even those in wheelchairs can use them, to let you get at least some aerobic exercise, within the heart rate limits allowed by your doctor.

    There are also rowing machines, in a number of different design configurations, involving some kind of pulling action with your arms and legs, but sitting down, of course. That would avoid any problems you may have with standing and balance, and lessen any issues with asymmetrical strength related to the stroke.

    Really hope something will work for you, since you may not be the best candidate for GBS, given your medical history. Has your doctor commented on that?


    I haven't even discussed it with him yet. I will when I have my annual physical.
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    Oct 15, 2008 5:42 PM GMT
    how about a recumbent bike with pedal straps?
  • shoelessj

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    Oct 15, 2008 5:42 PM GMT
    Don't give up this easily. See a physical therapist. That's what they are for.
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    Oct 16, 2008 4:42 AM GMT
    Fuck what your Doc says...if the treadmill made you feel better and it was working for you get a second opinion....the worst thing that you can do is place blind trust in what ONE doctor says...you have to grab your balls and take control of your health, your life and your destiny.
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    Oct 16, 2008 4:46 AM GMT
    i wouldn't have a right leg right now if i listened to Doctors's.
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    Oct 16, 2008 5:09 AM GMT

    You need to strenght train, it builds muscle that burns fat while you sleep.
    As far as the treadmill, did your doctor nix putting on your headphones and going for a walk on the beach/sidewalk/track? Adapt and overcome, recruit.
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    Oct 16, 2008 5:24 AM GMT
    treadmills are awful, in the long run. the impact on your joints takes a toll. go for less impactful stuff, like working out on an elliptical machine or taking spinning classes. you'll still burn the calories.
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    Oct 16, 2008 6:35 PM GMT
    I'm with what most everyone else has said.

    Get a 2nd opinion, just because your Dr. says so doesn't mean it's how it HAS to be.

    And if you find something you CAN do, don't not do it just because you don't like it. Hell, I hate getting up to do cardio in the morning, but I do it because I know it's good for me. And once it's done, even if it sucked, I feel a lot better because of it.

    Don't give up man!!
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    Oct 16, 2008 6:51 PM GMT
    Then start walking/jogging outside???? What about the stair-climber???
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    Oct 16, 2008 6:52 PM GMT
    if you had a stroke, go see a physical therapist, not that i've any authority to prescribe which specific treatment.. but since i'm going into the field, i know physical therapy deals with this greatly!! look into it
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    Oct 16, 2008 11:06 PM GMT
    I tend agree with the others who recommend a second opinion about the treadmill as well as a consult with a physical therapist or an exercise physiologist. Regardless of whether you decide to proceed with the gastric bypass, you can hopefully find an enjoyable form of aerobic exercise that will allow you mental and physical benefit.

    As for bypass surgery, my sister had a gastric bypass late this summer after many years of struggling with obesity and with consequent blood pressure and blood sugar issues looming - not to mention deep unhappiness with her situation. It has now been about two months since the operation. She has lost around 50 pounds (with about the same again to lose). She feels great and has no regrets. However, you should bear in mind that this is a major surgery with potentially serious consequences. We had an awful scare the week after my sister's operation. She collapsed suddenly with what looked like a blood clot in her lung. As it turned out some sutures in the bypass has ruptured - still serious, but less awful than an embolism. She needed a second surgery, spent a couple of days in the ICU and a few more days recuperating on a med/surg ward. She then went on to make a normal recovery. An important component to her success has been an exercise program and a group counseling program. So I would recommend that you try to find a hospital that does a lot of gastric bypasses and that has a full range of services available.

    Best of luck.
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    Oct 16, 2008 11:34 PM GMT
    At some point you need to take responsibilty for your own health.
    The " by your Doctor 's advice" stuff goes only so far and much of it it pure AMA brainwashing.
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    Oct 17, 2008 1:50 PM GMT
    sixxfive saidFuck what your Doc says...if the treadmill made you feel better and it was working for you get a second opinion....the worst thing that you can do is place blind trust in what ONE doctor says...you have to grab your balls and take control of your health, your life and your destiny.


    I grab my balls all day long!
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    Oct 17, 2008 1:54 PM GMT
    a1972guy saidThen start walking/jogging outside???? What about the stair-climber???


    Because when I put my weight in the stairmaster tells me to back the f*ck off.
  • asana

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    Oct 22, 2008 4:18 PM GMT
    Try swimming - it's no impact, and you can really get that 'in the zone' cardio feeling like on a treadmill. You can even get your ipod waterproofed and underwater headphones so you can keep your music!
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    Oct 22, 2008 4:29 PM GMT
    Kippler saidTry swimming - it's no impact, and you can really get that 'in the zone' cardio feeling like on a treadmill. You can even get your ipod waterproofed and underwater headphones so you can keep your music!

    Or an aquatherapy class...that is good way to exercise, tone up, and let the buoyancy help support you....ummm....you wont drown, will you? ...in which case, aquatherapy is counterindicated.