Medical School dating anyone

  • lereveur

    Posts: 7

    Apr 05, 2013 1:03 PM GMT
    Anyone a medical school student or dated one? What was/is the experience like?


    I'm planning to enter medical school soon, and one of my primary concerns is not having the time for dating/relationships in my life.
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    Apr 05, 2013 2:20 PM GMT
    I'm neither nor have I dated one... BUTT... one of my friends is a Med Student and has had a very hard time juggling with school and dating/relationships. The school and all it's assignments and/or whatnot haven taken over his life leaving little time for a lot of things.

    I apologize if this has discouraged you but you shouldn't let it discourage you. You may be one of the rare few that can manage the best of both worlds. And if you can manage to have time between your studies and whatnot, I don't see why you can't be able to have time for dating. As far as relationships go you'll just have to find a guy that has patience for things like these.

    But this is just what I think. Good Luck in your all your endeavors man. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Dominican_Gen...

    Posts: 379

    Apr 05, 2013 2:35 PM GMT
    Med school won't leave you time for that and if it did you would need to find a date/BF who doesn't mind been constantly on the back burner.
    Your best chance is finding another med student who will understand your unique situation, or somebody who doesn't work nor has any responsibility and can see you with very short notice and at odd hours.
  • nomad4life

    Posts: 332

    Apr 05, 2013 2:36 PM GMT
    I'm a vet student and, yes the courses are hard and the work load is tough, but I think it more so goes on an individual basis. I always find time to hang with people and even managed to go on a date with someone (who actually went to the med school right next door). That being said, I may be in the minority of that. I know A LOT of people that either a) have an extremely strained relationship b) have actually broken up or more so been dumped because their partner couldn't handle it c) have basically taken a vow of abstinence either because they want to focus entirely on their studies or believe their's just no chance of finding someone.

    It depends on how good of a student you are and how well you manage your time.
  • bumblejacket

    Posts: 66

    Apr 06, 2013 1:58 AM GMT
    i know some friends who attended med school who were able to date fine. But most of them were classmates, or beling to the higher year. some even got married afterwards. Of course there were breakups but nothing wrong with that. It's possible man.
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    Apr 06, 2013 2:10 AM GMT
    I'm curious as to whether you've finished pre-med, and if so, those classes alone should have kicked your ass enough to know that you won't have time for much extra-curricular activities. However, you could possess that talent that allows you to pursue other things. Focus on the school and the grades. The rest will come to you in time.
    Best wishes in your endeavors.
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    Apr 06, 2013 2:11 AM GMT
    I think anyone attending graduate school and doing a professional program is strapped for time. Beyond 40 hrs a week of interning, I have assignments to complete at home, presentations to do, studying, meals to prepare, exercise, psychotherapy, laundry to do, grocery shopping, ironing professional clothes, and me time (which I require, maybe if you don't need "me" time, then). You can do it. I know some people who have had relationships. I know a lot of them just hookup, which there is nothing wrong with as long as you keep yourself safe. I also think most guys in their 20s don't really want anything monogamous yet, so they don't get serious with anyone or shy away if it could get serious before it even starts. I also skip out on friend time because that's too much to organize.
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    Apr 06, 2013 3:03 AM GMT
    As a chemistry TA who has watched multiple pre-med students freak out, I can tell you if you're not in a relationship now...DON'T START ONE. If you're serious about becoming a doctor and being successful in you're classes, volunteering, shadowing, and finding clinical experience you don't have time. I'm told medical school is even more draining...so if you really want to be a great doctor, your dating life can wait.
  • Zinc

    Posts: 197

    Apr 06, 2013 3:04 AM GMT
    I'm in med school now. I would say don't plan on much dating unless you are lucky enough to find another gay med student who is a match, otherwise people will be unlikely to tolerate your time commitment.
  • heyom

    Posts: 389

    Apr 06, 2013 3:30 AM GMT
    You can only date people who can understand you have very little time and you're pretty much married to your career.

    http://healthland.time.com/2010/12/03/maybe-its-not-such-a-good-idea-to-marry-a-doctor/
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    Apr 06, 2013 3:31 AM GMT
    I would say it usually does not end up working out. Yeah there are cases of people making it work, but for the most part, spend your time studying and working.
  • Medjai

    Posts: 2671

    Apr 06, 2013 3:38 AM GMT
    I'm dating a doctor. Does that count?
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    Apr 06, 2013 3:52 AM GMT
    Honestly it all comes down to interests and compatibility. Relationships where the duo has shared interests are often unique but that doesn't necessarily have to be the case. Honestly if one loves one another, the relationship will work regardless because the power of love is what will drive the relationship and build that trust. But I'd say dating, I don't think will be possible unless you date someone who is in the same predicament, or perhaps in your same class haha. That's really the only way. I mean sure you can go on websites like this and use Grindr, or go on those online dating sites, but one could also argue that the valuable time that is spent on these sites could be spent better studying for that important exam...
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    Apr 06, 2013 7:01 AM GMT
    Second year med student here. I met the guy I'm seeing just a few months ago. He's not in medicine. So far things are going great!

    School is tough, but as long as your time management skills are decent you should have more than enough free time to ensure that a new relationship prospers. Many of my colleagues have started new romances in the last two years.

    That said, exam season is fast approaching and all the meddies will be MIA from their families, friends, and partners for at least a few weeks. Also, from what I've heard third year clerkships are significantly more stressful than the first two academic years. Dating and building new relationships might become a lot more difficult during that time.
  • cavecanem10

    Posts: 70

    Apr 07, 2013 4:12 AM GMT
    I'm looking to transition from a heavy travel job to buckling down and applying to medical school. I think it'll be intense, but I figure if we can survive my weekly trip job, we can do medical school, ideally in the same state. I have heard/seen from my friends in medical school that it's either that you guys will end up married or broken up.

    Gotta take it step by step though!
  • lereveur

    Posts: 7

    Apr 07, 2013 4:55 AM GMT
    cavecanem10 saidI'm looking to transition from a heavy travel job to buckling down and applying to medical school. I think it'll be intense, but I figure if we can survive my weekly trip job, we can do medical school, ideally in the same state. I have heard/seen from my friends in medical school that it's either that you guys will end up married or broken up.

    Gotta take it step by step though!


    That seems to be the general impression I've received as well. Either way, marriage or breaking up are 50-50, and I see opportunities in both. My approach when entering medical school is to just capitalize on opportunity.

    Congrats on the decision to pursue a new endeavor. I believe it will be a fulfilling experience.
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Apr 07, 2013 12:56 PM GMT
    Little Cart before the Horse there

    Medical School is going to be .... of course priority
    and usually you won't have time for dating in the traditional sense
    But you never know what might happen

    But don't go in looking to be dating in Medical School
    This is going to be a transitional point in your life
    You're going to be pressed for time
    You're not going to know where you're going to wind up .... where you'll be once residencies start
    making plans with someone is going to be tuff and if not impossible

    Put dating way in the back burner for now
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 13, 2013 3:10 AM GMT
    GQjock saidLittle Cart before the Horse there

    Medical School is going to be .... of course priority
    and usually you won't have time for dating in the traditional sense
    But you never know what might happen

    But don't go in looking to be dating in Medical School
    This is going to be a transitional point in your life
    You're going to be pressed for time
    You're not going to know where you're going to wind up .... where you'll be once residencies start
    making plans with someone is going to be tuff and if not impossible

    Put dating way in the back burner for now


    This ^^

    Medical school and your subsequent residency will be the hardest years of your professional career. Add to that the pressures of dating and new romances you can easily see why it's a thin line to walk on.

    However you never know what can happen. I met my ex-BF the summer before medical school started (he wasn't in medicine) and that relationship lasted until Match Day in 4th year (yep, bittersweet:cryicon_smile.gif. Met my husband during residency. Keep your eye on the prize and stay focused but don't lose track of what is important....easier said than done in medicine icon_wink.gif