Beware of Dollar Rent A Car

  • OutdoorAdvent...

    Posts: 361

    Apr 06, 2013 5:39 PM GMT
    Forewarned is forearmed...

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/06/your-money/for-car-renters-signing-on-the-electronic-tablet-may-mean-trouble.html?_r=0

    Although we're well beyond the point that it's needed, this is more evidence that free market economies need to be regulated by the people (i.e., the government), and that the regulations need to be enforced.
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    Apr 06, 2013 5:40 PM GMT
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  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    Apr 06, 2013 5:40 PM GMT
    McQueen saidBOLD TEXT GOES HEREITALIC TEXT GOES HEREUNDERLINE TEXT GOES HERE
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    :lol
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 06, 2013 6:07 PM GMT
    Thanks to the OP for sharing this interesting article.

    Companies that incentivize their employees with deceptive practices designed to cheat their customers are essentially acknowledging their business models are failures. Disruptions - such as the "sharing economy" with forerunners like Zipcar and Airbnb - will also ensure this. Dollar's parent company Hertz needs to reflect deeply on their true value proposition.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Apr 06, 2013 6:07 PM GMT
    caveat emptor
  • Whipmagic

    Posts: 1481

    Apr 06, 2013 7:59 PM GMT
    A couple of years ago, a rental car agent told me that he would simply not rent my a car, as per company policy, if I didn't buy the insurance. It was a business trip, and my company self-insures and won't reimburse me for such a charge; I also have rental car insurance through my auto insurance and my credit card. But the agent refused to let me decline it. It was late night after a cross-country flight, with several co-workers in tow, and we just wanted to get to the hotel, so I had to give in, a later complaint to the company was not answered.

    Two years later, a letter from a law firm: they had sued the rental car company in a class-action lawsuit, and I could gt some money from the settlement. It was less than the insurance fee, but still something. I'm glad someone took it upon him to bring this suit.
  • TroyAthlete

    Posts: 4269

    Apr 06, 2013 8:10 PM GMT
    Whipmagic saidTwo years later, a letter from a law firm: they had sued the rental car company in a class-action lawsuit, and I could gt some money from the settlement. It was less than the insurance fee, but still something. I'm glad someone took it upon him to bring this suit.


    NIce, a rental car company once tried to screw me over this way. My insurance company -- which is invite only based upon certain criteria -- actually CALLED ME (still don't know how they found out I was renting a car, it was a little creepy) and told me not to buy the insurance. When the rental agent resisted, they got on the phone with the agent and yelled at him until he gave him.

    I love having an insurance/finance company that cares. They're priceless. The free roadside service, too, has saved my butt a million times.
  • OutdoorAdvent...

    Posts: 361

    Apr 06, 2013 8:20 PM GMT
    TroyAthlete said
    Whipmagic saidTwo years later, a letter from a law firm: they had sued the rental car company in a class-action lawsuit, and I could gt some money from the settlement. It was less than the insurance fee, but still something. I'm glad someone took it upon him to bring this suit.


    NIce, a rental car company once tried to screw me over this way. My insurance company -- which is invite only based upon certain criteria -- actually CALLED ME (still don't know how they found out I was renting a car, it was a little creepy) and told me not to buy the insurance. When the rental agent resisted, they got on the phone with the agent and yelled at him until he gave him.

    I love having an insurance/finance company that cares. They're priceless. The free roadside service, too, has saved my butt a million times.


    A million times? Dude, you need a new car or to change your driving habits, or both. Drive with jumper cables, a gallon of gas (properly stored) in the trunk, a coat hanger for lockouts, etc. Or, more likely, you were speaking hyperbolically.
  • starboard5

    Posts: 969

    Apr 06, 2013 8:50 PM GMT
    Thanks for posting this.
  • TroyAthlete

    Posts: 4269

    Apr 06, 2013 9:02 PM GMT
    OutdoorAdventurist said
    A million times? Dude, you need a new car or to change your driving habits, or both. Drive with jumper cables, a gallon of gas (properly stored) in the trunk, a coat hanger for lockouts, etc. Or, more likely, you were speaking hyperbolically.


    No, obviously I was speaking literally.

    In all seriousness, I do need to keep a hide-a-key somewhere in the undercarriage. It's gotten a bit ridiculous. You can't keep gas in trunk in Cali, or I most assuredly would.

  • OutdoorAdvent...

    Posts: 361

    Apr 06, 2013 9:15 PM GMT
    TroyAthlete said
    OutdoorAdventurist said
    A million times? Dude, you need a new car or to change your driving habits, or both. Drive with jumper cables, a gallon of gas (properly stored) in the trunk, a coat hanger for lockouts, etc. Or, more likely, you were speaking hyperbolically.

    No, obviously I was speaking literally.
    In all seriousness, I do need to keep a hide-a-key somewhere in the undercarriage. It's gotten a bit ridiculous. You can't keep gas in trunk in Cali, or I most assuredly would.


    How 'bout in the glove compartment?
    You're right, a spare key magneted onto the underside beats a coat hanger. But spare keys these days can set you back >$100, an auto industry scam. And the problem with a coat hanger is that if it's in the car, you can't get to it.
  • TroyAthlete

    Posts: 4269

    Apr 06, 2013 10:31 PM GMT
    OutdoorAdventurist saidYou're right, a spare key magneted onto the underside beats a coat hanger. But spare keys these days can set you back >$100, an auto industry scam. And the problem with a coat hanger is that if it's in the car, you can't get to it.


    $100 for a key? What are your spare keys made of, gold? I had three or four spare keys made for my car, they cost about $10 total down at the local mom n pop hardwood store.
  • Lucky350

    Posts: 167

    Apr 06, 2013 10:41 PM GMT
    Always fix anything on a rent-a-car under the counter!!!

    They'll always charge retail for that stuff

    Ouch!!!
  • OutdoorAdvent...

    Posts: 361

    Apr 06, 2013 11:33 PM GMT
    TroyAthlete said
    OutdoorAdventurist saidYou're right, a spare key magneted onto the underside beats a coat hanger. But spare keys these days can set you back >$100, an auto industry scam. And the problem with a coat hanger is that if it's in the car, you can't get to it.


    $100 for a key? What are your spare keys made of, gold? I had three or four spare keys made for my car, they cost about $10 total down at the local mom n pop hardwood store.


    You may be dating yourself, or at least your car, here, mate. Keys these days have computer chips in them, and thus very expensive to copy/replace, or at least that's been my experience.
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    Apr 06, 2013 11:38 PM GMT
    OutdoorAdventurist saidForewarned is forearmed...

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/06/your-money/for-car-renters-signing-on-the-electronic-tablet-may-mean-trouble.html?_r=0

    Although we're well beyond the point that it's needed, this is more evidence that free market economies need to be regulated by the people (i.e., the government), and that the regulations need to be enforced.


    The phrase "buyer beware" comes to mind. As to more government - sometimes the cure can be worse than the disease- as would be the case here.




  • OutdoorAdvent...

    Posts: 361

    Apr 06, 2013 11:46 PM GMT
    desertmuscl said
    OutdoorAdventurist saidForewarned is forearmed...

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/06/your-money/for-car-renters-signing-on-the-electronic-tablet-may-mean-trouble.html?_r=0

    Although we're well beyond the point that it's needed, this is more evidence that free market economies need to be regulated by the people (i.e., the government), and that the regulations need to be enforced.


    The phrase "buyer beware" comes to mind. As to more government - sometimes the cure can be worse than the disease- as would be the case here.


    I'd guess that the many who have been, and no doubt continue to be ripped off by Dollar's practices would differ. As the article notes, they are filing a class action against the company's unfair and deceptive business practices, thus permitted by government regulations to seek three times the damages they've experienced as a result of those practices. The courts that will hear their claims being the judicial branch of government operating under regulations established by the legislative branch and enforced by the executive branch.
  • TroyAthlete

    Posts: 4269

    Apr 06, 2013 11:47 PM GMT
    OutdoorAdventurist said
    TroyAthlete said
    OutdoorAdventurist saidYou're right, a spare key magneted onto the underside beats a coat hanger. But spare keys these days can set you back >$100, an auto industry scam. And the problem with a coat hanger is that if it's in the car, you can't get to it.


    $100 for a key? What are your spare keys made of, gold? I had three or four spare keys made for my car, they cost about $10 total down at the local mom n pop hardwood store.


    You may be dating yourself, or at least your car, here, mate. Keys these days have computer chips in them, and thus very expensive to copy/replace, or at least that's been my experience.


    Ahhh, haha, yeah I have a 2002. $100? Yikes. I usually like to keep a spare key at home and at work. How many keys do you get with a new auto purchase these days?