Masculinity, Bisexuality, Male Sexual Flexibility, Grero

  • andytx

    Posts: 3

    Apr 17, 2013 1:27 AM GMT
    I've written a book that touches on bisexuality and masculinity. The thesis is that most men have a bisexual potential that is suppressed by a homophobic culture. It's especially recommended reading for masculine men who have a hard time finding other masculine men.

    The book is free and so is the audiobook: http://grero.com/ or http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_K0QZBsNZgwnxMdhxIqoFz9JgpweGXZW

    This looks spammy, first post and all. The book is non-commercial and I want to start a conversation so I will check back here often for questions or comments. Thanks!
  • wcubrad23

    Posts: 37

    Apr 18, 2013 2:20 AM GMT
    andytx saidI've written a book that touches on bisexuality and masculinity. The thesis is that most men have a bisexual potential that is suppressed by a homophobic culture. It's especially recommended reading for masculine men who have a hard time finding other masculine men.

    The book is free and so is the audiobook: http://grero.com/ or http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_K0QZBsNZgwnxMdhxIqoFz9JgpweGXZW

    This looks spammy, first post and all. The book is non-commercial and I want to start a conversation so I will check back here often for questions or comments. Thanks!


    Does your book address the bisexual potential of gay men? Interesting thesis, but I don't think most men have bisexual potential. Maybe most have the potential for a "bisexual moment," but nothing long lasting or enduring. Yeah, I don't believe most men have a bisexual orientation. At most curiosity and discover it is not for them. Or it was "okay."
  • andytx

    Posts: 3

    Apr 19, 2013 9:46 PM GMT
    wcubrad23 saidDoes your book address the bisexual potential of gay men?


    No, just those who identify as straight though the book is aimed at men who at least acknowledge some same-sex desires and want more info as to what they're feeling etc.

    wcubrad23 saidInteresting thesis, but I don't think most men have bisexual potential. Maybe most have the potential for a "bisexual moment," but nothing long lasting or enduring. Yeah, I don't believe most men have a bisexual orientation. At most curiosity and discover it is not for them. Or it was "okay."


    The book makes that case with examples. There are quite a few cultures in which same-sex sex was common, not just tolerated for a small number. The most striking is Rome. Of the first twenty Roman emperors, 18 (90%!!) were recorded to have had sex with other men.
  • wcubrad23

    Posts: 37

    Apr 22, 2013 6:52 AM GMT
    andytx said
    wcubrad23 saidDoes your book address the bisexual potential of gay men?


    No, just those who identify as straight though the book is aimed at men who at least acknowledge some same-sex desires and want more info as to what they're feeling etc.

    wcubrad23 saidInteresting thesis, but I don't think most men have bisexual potential. Maybe most have the potential for a "bisexual moment," but nothing long lasting or enduring. Yeah, I don't believe most men have a bisexual orientation. At most curiosity and discover it is not for them. Or it was "okay."


    The book makes that case with examples. There are quite a few cultures in which same-sex sex was common, not just tolerated for a small number. The most striking is Rome. Of the first twenty Roman emperors, 18 (90%!!) were recorded to have had sex with other men.


    I always wondered if sexual orientation had some "post-natal" influences to it. But people on here will quickly shoot you down and say you are "100% born x way."
  • andytx

    Posts: 3

    May 12, 2013 4:58 AM GMT
    wcubrad23 saidI always wondered if sexual orientation had some "post-natal" influences to it. But people on here will quickly shoot you down and say you are "100% born x way."


    I think it's more than just that there are post-natal influences. If you look at other cultures like the ancient Greeks or Romans, you'll see that our concept of sexual orientation does not cover everyone and is highly restrictive. Just because everyone has genitalia and thus you can divide sexual partners into either homo or hetero categories does not mean that what is measured is the preference for the genitalia. Say for example that I have 8 male partners and 2 female partners. Am I more interested in penis? Well, not necessarily. It may mean that what I'm interested occurs more frequently in men.

    Any more questions?