Working out too much?

  • MidwesternKid

    Posts: 1167

    Apr 19, 2013 6:46 PM GMT
    I do the Strong and Lean workouts 3 days out of the week, and run 5 to 6 days a week. A minimum of 5.5 miles and at times 7.6 miles in each run. I am in the best shape I have ever been in. I am down to my high school weight, 190.

    I look great. I feel great. But I am receiving so much concern from people in my life about my health. They tell me I am running too much and that I need to stop losing weight.

    Am I overdoing it?

  • Apr 20, 2013 1:06 AM GMT
    The amount of training that you say you are doing does not necessarily sound excessive. You may want to keep the running to 5 days instead of 6, because it can be hard on your joints (without immediately realizing it).

    What are your actual fitness goals? Just weight loss?

    Also, how are your energy levels and moods?

    It sounds like your friends may be concerned that you are becoming a bit obsessive.

    If they are just mistaking your disciplined pursuit for better health with an obsession, then ignore them and keep up the good work. Just make sure that you maintain a healthy and balanced diet so that you don't just waste away.

    However, if you think there may be some truth to what your friends are saying, maybe you should re-evaluate your fitness goals.
  • DanOmatic

    Posts: 1155

    Apr 20, 2013 1:42 AM GMT
    I dunno. I think as long as the rest of your life is in balance, and if you're taking a day or two each week to recover and you don't have any injuries, you're golden. However, unless you're training for some type of race, it's hard to sustain that kind of effort for too long before you start to get weary of it or start having injuries.

    You can physically put yourself into a hole that is hard to dig your way out of. Overtraining syndrome is a known phenomenon among endurance athletes who think more is better, until they've worn themselves down to a nub and begin to experience chronic fatigue, sleeplessness, etc.

    If that's not happening, then hell--channel all of that running into entering some 10km (or longer) races. You might find that the structure of that gives purpose to all of your workouts.
  • MidwesternKid

    Posts: 1167

    Apr 20, 2013 3:03 AM GMT
    My immediate fitness goal has already been reached which was to get back to and around 190.

    I feel fantastic. I am not fatigued or feeling down or sleepless. Everything feels great. Never been so on top of my game with work and my personal life as I am now.

    My overall fitness goal is to become as light and as strong as possible. I want my body to be tailored for volleyball. Light and powerful.

    I had a chance to see if my hard work was doing me any good at a tournament a few months back and I was amazed. I wonder if it is the definition that people see showing up from doing workouts that makes it seem like I am wasting away.

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    Apr 20, 2013 3:12 AM GMT
    It really depends on how you feel. Overtraining for one person might not be overtraining for another person. I worked out with one of my friends who does higher volume than me and higher intensity than me and I felt like shit the day after the workout. He was fine after the workout and had the energy to go to the gym the next day. It really depends on the individual.
  • MidwesternKid

    Posts: 1167

    Apr 20, 2013 3:38 AM GMT
    jr17 saidIt really depends on how you feel. Overtraining for one person might not be overtraining for another person. I worked out with one of my friends who does higher volume than me and higher intensity than me and I felt like shit the day after the workout. He was fine after the workout and had the energy to go to the gym the next day. It really depends on the individual.


    I feel fantastic. I was for a time doing 7.6 miles a day, but a veteran runner told me that was excessive so I go for 5.5 on a regular basis.
  • mybud

    Posts: 11837

    Apr 20, 2013 3:41 AM GMT
    Feeling great is a positive attribute from working out...Keep doing what your doing...
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    Apr 20, 2013 4:11 AM GMT
    If you're feeling good and you're not sacrificing your social and work life then keep at it I say.
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    Apr 20, 2013 4:14 AM GMT
    Dahas saidIf you're feeling good and you're not sacrificing your social and work life then keep at it I say.


    Wait- it's not supposed to interfere with our social life? lololol

    I don't drink anymore because I get anxiety at the thought of what alcohol would do to my body. Best sobering thought ever.

    Has impacted my social life though. The gym is always more important at this point and I refuse to lose focus on my goals. #notsorry
  • slimnmuscly

    Posts: 541

    Apr 20, 2013 4:50 AM GMT
    Do these concerned people make fitness a priority in their own lives? A lot of couch potatoes worry themselves sick about the ill effects of excessive exercise.
  • He_Man

    Posts: 906

    Apr 20, 2013 5:01 AM GMT
    slimnmuscly saidDo these concerned people make fitness a priority in their own lives? A lot of couch potatoes worry themselves sick about the ill effects of excessive exercise.


    I know, right? Excessive exercise? Please, excessive exercise for many today would be walking to their grocery store located three blocks away.

    I hate it when people say, "oh, don't workout so hard or too much. It's not good for you." Please, the human body evolved to move. That's what separates the Kingdom Animalia from the Kingdom Plantae - the ability to move around and gather energy sources without staying stationary. Nature evolved animals for a reason, mainly, to move about, not sitting on our fat asses watching television for endless hours.

    If you're are eating adequate nutrition, getting plenty of rest, then the body is extremely capable of recovering from whatever stress you put on it. Believe me, you'll know when you start to over train because you'll start getting sick, lose the desire to train and feel weak, of which you say you have none of these symptoms. Go ahead and do what you're doing. Professional athletes train six to eight hours a day, and like I said, if you're eating enough, resting enough, then you'll be fine.
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    Apr 20, 2013 5:47 AM GMT
    The running seems excessive but if you enjoy it and like the way you look, who the fuck cares? 6'3 and 190 seems pretty good to me.
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    Apr 20, 2013 6:22 AM GMT
    I'm pretty sure I'd drop dead if I tried running that far. Running is such a high impact work out to be doing that much of. Why not swim or something that wont damage your body?
  • 1blind_dog

    Posts: 376

    Apr 20, 2013 9:06 AM GMT
    In my experience friends seem to get worried when the face seems to get lean and too thin because that's what they see first. At one point I was told I looked like I had cancer because I had lost more weight and they could really see it in my face but really I was just getting in better shape and was perfectly healthy. It can happen when you run that much. As long as you don't have an eating disorder, you're probably fine.
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    Apr 20, 2013 9:25 AM GMT
    First and foremost, have a fitness goal and what you want to achieve. Keep it simple and keep it long term.
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    Apr 20, 2013 9:31 AM GMT
    One thing I learned is that you need to listen to yourself. People's comments are usually more about them than you. They are seeing your progress and improvements and feel inadequate themselves and will make comments that you should stop. Misery loves company, you know.

    I can't tell you how many times people have told me that they prefer me fat. Fuck them.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14354

    Apr 20, 2013 6:37 PM GMT
    Working out too muchicon_question.gif My problem is getting motivated and getting back into the gym on a consistant basisicon_sad.gif I wish that I faced the problem of "working out too much".
  • MidwesternKid

    Posts: 1167

    Apr 21, 2013 3:59 AM GMT
    slimnmuscly saidDo these concerned people make fitness a priority in their own lives? A lot of couch potatoes worry themselves sick about the ill effects of excessive exercise.


    I have taken note to the group of people who do make it a point to tell me their concerns.

    Mothers. They have children who are my age or around it. They do not make fitness a part of their life as much as I do.
  • MidwesternKid

    Posts: 1167

    Apr 21, 2013 4:02 AM GMT
    THECHAD saidI'm pretty sure I'd drop dead if I tried running that far. Running is such a high impact work out to be doing that much of. Why not swim or something that wont damage your body?


    This also has been a concern for me. But then again the old man who was on the cover of every newspaper and website of the Boston Marathon was in his 70s and running far more than me in one go.

    I would like to pick up swimming and if I can manage a gym membership where I have a pool that doesnt go ten feet deep I would love to replace running with winning. The teen foot deep thing is because I am TERRIFIED of deep water.


    TERRIFIED.
  • MidwesternKid

    Posts: 1167

    Apr 21, 2013 4:04 AM GMT
    He_Man you make a valid point. Professionals workout in a day what I potentially put into a whole week.
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2605

    Apr 25, 2013 11:27 PM GMT
    jr17 saidIt really depends on how you feel. Overtraining for one person might not be overtraining for another person. I worked out with one of my friends who does higher volume than me and higher intensity than me and I felt like shit the day after the workout. He was fine after the workout and had the energy to go to the gym the next day. It really depends on the individual.


    Agree with the above. Your best guide to the correct level of exercise is how you personally feel, but it sounds to me like you`re not overdoing it so far.

    Always get plenty of rest as that`s the other side to gaining fitness long term(and preventing injury).

    As posted above, running is a high impact exercise, so you might like to mix it up a bit with some other cardio, swimming or cycling, etc.; partly as rest, partly as a change and variety.
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    Apr 26, 2013 12:05 AM GMT
    He_Man said

    If you're are eating adequate nutrition, getting plenty of rest, then the body is extremely capable of recovering from whatever stress you put on it. Believe me, you'll know when you start to over train because you'll start getting sick, lose the desire to train and feel weak, of which you say you have none of these symptoms. Go ahead and do what you're doing. Professional athletes train six to eight hours a day, and like I said, if you're eating enough, resting enough, then you'll be fine.


    I personally have been in a situation to train too much, and he's right, the above stated consequences 'can' happen, and they did happen to me. Got sick every month for 3-4 months. It's easy to get caught up in your gains and think "wow, if I can do this working out 4x a week for 45 mins, let me go everyday and do 1.5 hours!" but unfortunately, your body doesn't adapt 'that' quick.

    Can some people do it, eh, I'm sure. I have a friend who does a full body workout everyday, I don't know for how long, and he looks great. But I think 3 days of weight training and 5 days of cardio sounds great for a person that wants to lose weight or 'cut'. Do what works best for you, if you're extremely happy, then maybe those people just haven't found what makes them feel happy and that's why they find it weird! My family finds my gym obsession weird icon_smile.gif