Anyone do Sous Vide? Recipe recommendations?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 20, 2013 12:50 AM GMT
    So I'm in the process of building my own sous vide which I'm particularly excited about:
    Original:
    http://makezine.com/25/sousvide/

    Modification that I'm trying to replicate:
    http://www.nomatter-nevermind.com/diy-sous-vide-immersion-cooker-on-the-cheap/

    Found this site - and couldn't help salivating:
    http://meandmytorch.com/recipes/sous-vide-pork-shoulder
    http://meandmytorch.com/tag/sous-vide-2

    I'll definitely be trying to pork shoulder, and the chuck. I'm also excited to try salmon:
    http://nomnompaleo.com/post/2809935729/sous-vide-wild-king-salmon

    Anyone else have other recommendations/experience with sous vide?
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    Apr 20, 2013 1:02 AM GMT
    I've done a bit of it.

    Eggs are amazing, you can get the perfect jelled yoke and just done white that is incredible.

    My fav has been steak, dry aged, I don't season it or do anything with it just in the vacuum pack and slow cook for 24 hours. Throw it in a stainless steel pan that's really hot after oiling and seasoning the steak its self rather then putting the oil in the pan. Sear and your done. Perfect rare from edge to edge.

    I slow cooked a stew in it once, it was pretty damned good although it lacked colour since there wasn't any Maillard reaction going on. But it was insanely tasty and every pouch was one portion which I froze straight from the cooker to the freezer.

    Really anything you cook in an oven or stove can be cooked in a sous vide, meats, vege, fruit, all the same just different temp and times. It's more important that the temp is stable through the entire process.
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    Apr 20, 2013 1:15 AM GMT
    lilTanker saidI've done a bit of it.

    Eggs are amazing, you can get the perfect jelled yoke and just done white that is incredible.

    My fav has been steak, dry aged, I don't season it or do anything with it just in the vacuum pack and slow cook for 24 hours. Throw it in a stainless steel pan that's really hot after oiling and seasoning the steak its self rather then putting the oil in the pan. Sear and your done. Perfect rare from edge to edge.

    I slow cooked a stew in it once, it was pretty damned good although it lacked colour since there wasn't any Maillard reaction going on. But it was insanely tasty and every pouch was one portion which I froze straight from the cooker to the freezer.

    Really anything you cook in an oven or stove can be cooked in a sous vide, meats, vege, fruit, all the same just different temp and times. It's more important that the temp is stable through the entire process.


    What was your setup like or do you have something like the sousvide supreme?
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Apr 20, 2013 1:29 AM GMT
    I've only recently mastered the omelet, with a ton of mozzarella cheese. What are you talking about?
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    Apr 20, 2013 1:32 AM GMT
    barriehomeboy saidI've only recently mastered the omelet, with a ton of mozzarella cheese. What are you talking about?


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sous-vide (you basically cook food to the temperature you want to eat it at) - the advantage being that you can break down say the connective tissue but still keep the flavor in so you can supposedly make chuck steak taste better than filet mignon (see above for links). Oh and you can't ever overcook the food.
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Apr 20, 2013 1:34 AM GMT
    um, what about not killing the bacteria in the food with the low heat?
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    Apr 20, 2013 1:43 AM GMT
    barriehomeboy saidum, what about not killing the bacteria in the food with the low heat?


    e.g. for chicken -
    http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/04/sous-vide-basics-low-temperature-chicken.html

    The data was taken directly from the USDA's guide to obtaining a 7.0 log10 relative reduction in salmonella in chicken. For those of you who don't know what a 7.0 log10 relative reduction is, it's the bacterial equivalent of sticking a stick of dynamite in an anthill. The vast majority of the baddies become harmless, dead, ex-baddies.

    20100413-Sous-vide-chicken-chart.jpg

    Essentially, the red line in this graph indicates how long a piece of chicken needs to be cooked at a specific temperature in order to be deemed safe for consumption. So, for example, we see that at 165°F, the chicken is safe pretty much instantaneously (hence the 165°F minimum internal temperature recommendation by the USDA—they are being very conservative and assuming you will bite into it the second it reaches that temp). Whereas at 140°F, the chicken needs to be held for 35 minutes to be safe.

    Now with a conventional oven, this chart is totally useless. Since your cooking environment is much higher than your desired final temperature there is no way to hold your meat at a steady low temperature—it hits 140°F, then continues to go up and up and up. So the best you can do is take the center to 165°F to ensure that the entire piece of chicken is safe to consume, by which point it's already expelled a great deal of its moisture.
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    Apr 20, 2013 2:27 AM GMT
    riddler78 saidWhat was your setup like or do you have something like the sousvide supreme?

    It was a lab grade water heater, it would hold the temp stable at any temp you wanted + / - 0.5c or + / - 0.05 can't remember exactly what but it was exact and very fun to play with.

    I didn't get to keep it though could only borrow it for a few months.
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    Apr 20, 2013 4:29 PM GMT
    lilTanker said
    riddler78 saidWhat was your setup like or do you have something like the sousvide supreme?

    It was a lab grade water heater, it would hold the temp stable at any temp you wanted + / - 0.5c or + / - 0.05 can't remember exactly what but it was exact and very fun to play with.

    I didn't get to keep it though could only borrow it for a few months.


    That's pretty awesome. A friend who is a highschool chemistry teacher also has one of those but did you have any issues where the water circulation wasn't consistent - ie because there wasn't water circulation it was possible that one side of the tank would heat up faster than the other depending on how much meat was in there or how close the food was to the bottom?
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    Apr 20, 2013 11:39 PM GMT
    riddler78 saidThat's pretty awesome. A friend who is a highschool chemistry teacher also has one of those but did you have any issues where the water circulation wasn't consistent - ie because there wasn't water circulation it was possible that one side of the tank would heat up faster than the other depending on how much meat was in there or how close the food was to the bottom?

    Na, it had a circulation pump and a hose you'd attach to the intake to place on the other side of the tank of water. You didn't have to use the hose but I did.

    It was powerful enough that it caused a fair bit of turbulence in the water.
  • Whipmagic

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    Apr 20, 2013 11:50 PM GMT
    I have modified my built-in steamer by welding in inlets and outlets for a circulation pump, and added a relay and a better temperature controller. It's now a really functional piece of equipment for sous vide and conventional steaming.

    Where I found that sous vide cooking makes the biggest difference is with chicken breast. It stays really moist on the inside while being cooked very evenly throughout - something I have difficulties achieving when I sauté or broil it.
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    Nov 25, 2013 12:51 AM GMT
    So it's been built and I've been playing around with it...

    It's pretty amazing.

    I used these plans:
    http://makezine.com/projects/Sous-Vide-Immersion-Cooker/
    55OM1usXgEmQlu5Z.jpg

    I'm using a roaster oven as the heating source though so that there's a cover that I can use to reduce the amount of heat escaping.

    Might start a new thread for it... for favorite sous vide recipes but am attempting this recipe next (chicken breasts are going in the sous vide now):
    http://www.bunkycooks.com/2012/01/30-hour-sous-vide-eye-of-round-roast/
    sous-vide-10.jpg