860+ exoplanets detected so far

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    Apr 20, 2013 8:16 AM GMT
    A total of 861 extrasolar planets (in 677 planetary systems, including 128 multiple planetary systems) have been identified as of March 22, 2013.
    http://exoplanet.eu/catalog/

    A visual as of June 2012:
    exoplanets.png

    The Hubble Ultra-Deep Field:
    humble_zps54089fcb.png

    Carl Sagan's enlightening words:






  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2605

    Apr 20, 2013 8:27 PM GMT
    The Drake equation is unfolding before our eyes....
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    Apr 20, 2013 8:28 PM GMT
    Fascinating ! I love anything to do with outer space.
  • The_Guruburu

    Posts: 895

    Apr 20, 2013 9:30 PM GMT
    This is very exciting news. Hey, I know, why don't we cut NASA's budget in celebration?
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    Apr 21, 2013 12:37 AM GMT
    I'm assuming the dark blue dots are terrestrial planets?
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    Apr 21, 2013 2:20 AM GMT
    Lincsbear saidThe Drake equation is unfolding before our eyes....
    The Drake equation doesn't even start until life (especially 'intelligent' life) is found somewhere other than this earth. icon_wink.gif
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    Apr 21, 2013 2:34 AM GMT
    Bustamante saidFascinating ! I love anything to do with outer space.


    +1!!
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    Apr 21, 2013 2:58 AM GMT
    there are billions of stars (suns) so how do these relatively few planets relate to that? (I read a (something about outer space) for Dummies-book but have forgotten most of it. It was fascinating)
  • Rhi_Bran

    Posts: 904

    Apr 21, 2013 4:37 AM GMT
    You know what's sad?

    Even if we found extraterrestrial life, there would still be many many people on earth who wouldn't be bothered to learn any amount of humility.

    Also, wes, it might have something to do with the fact that stars give off mind boggling amounts of light and heat (even if it takes years to get to us) and have exponentially greater mass than planets (example: the Sun is ~330,000x more massive than Earth). Because of this we can detect stars from great distances, whereas we can only really detect relatively nearby planets. There are likely far more than we account for, but detecting them is difficult since they're small, silent, and for the most part cold. Blips of data that *could* be planets could just as likely be static interference.
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    Apr 21, 2013 8:27 AM GMT
    Deport all homophobes , killers , terrorists there , earth would be a better planet without them.
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    Apr 21, 2013 8:51 AM GMT
    Again, there is no rational reason to have or not have humility . . . Sagan was, at best, one or two notches above a Falwell . . .


    . . . Sagan's absurd world- or universe-view assumes volition, which is not supported by reason and which would require an extra-normal, meta-physical impetus.


    . . . so why do you worship him?
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2605

    Apr 21, 2013 9:47 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    Lincsbear saidThe Drake equation is unfolding before our eyes....
    The Drake equation doesn't even start until life (especially 'intelligent' life) is found somewhere other than this earth. icon_wink.gif


    I thought the Drake equation began with the number of stars in the Milky Way galaxy, then on to the number of newly created stars per year, then planets, then earth like planets, etc.?

    We`re slowly defining one factor among many others more precisely (with actual evidence) after years of theoretical speculation.
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    Apr 22, 2013 12:06 AM GMT
    Cool story - but the prospect of finding a "class M" (in Star Trek speak - an earth-liveable) planet and then getting people and materiel there in under 500 years would be miraculous.

    Are not most of these exoplanets either supermassive terrestrial worlds, or outside their respective Goldilocks zones, or gas giants?
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    Apr 28, 2013 1:57 PM GMT
    AlphaTrigger saidAre not most of these exoplanets either supermassive terrestrial worlds, or outside their respective Goldilocks zones, or gas giants?


    And then there's Gliese 667 Cc.
  • Whipmagic

    Posts: 1481

    Apr 28, 2013 2:19 PM GMT
    That just means that when you die, you can have your own planet after all. Kolob is waiting!