Boston Marathon victims and heroes thread

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 23, 2013 10:46 PM GMT
    Hey RJers, post any stories you find about the victims and heroes of the Boston Marathon tragedy here.

    On your mark.

    Get set.

    Go!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 24, 2013 12:05 AM GMT
    The terrorists have succeeded. Non-stop news coverage, stories, different angles, and too many threads on it. Moving on is the best thing to do now, IMO.
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2605

    Apr 24, 2013 12:20 AM GMT
    wrestlervic saidThe terrorists have succeeded. Non-stop news coverage, stories, different angles, and too many threads on it. Moving on is the best thing to do now, IMO.


    Agree. So much air time spent on sad, pathetic, ultimately impotent criminals.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 24, 2013 2:52 AM GMT
    Even the victims are saying they want to move on. AC interviewed a woman who lost her foot with her boyfriend by her side, also injured, and she said she is moving on now to learn how to dance, her life's passion, with the missing limb. She was so uplifting and positive.

    There, there is your survivor story. icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 24, 2013 3:28 AM GMT
    Five hours and one shared story... let's go, folks!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 24, 2013 3:51 AM GMT
    wrestlervic saidThe terrorists have succeeded. Non-stop news coverage, stories, different angles, and too many threads on it. Moving on is the best thing to do now, IMO.


    Completely agree. I had every media outlet here in Edmonton contact me while in Boston for interviews. It baffles me how these people found my email addy and I declined every interview!

    The media and ourselves will discuss this at nauseum for the next week or so but what will be forgotten in the drama of the event is the long term consequence of those injured and the literal lifelong struggle they will endure.

    It sickens me to think that someone will make this into a movie.
  • musclmed

    Posts: 3284

    Apr 24, 2013 4:00 AM GMT
    not really with any luck he will plead guilty. No death penalty and spend 80+ years rotting in supermax solitary.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 24, 2013 4:15 AM GMT
    dayumm saidHey RJers, post any stories you find about the victims and heroes of the Boston Marathon tragedy here.

    On your mark.

    Get set.

    Go!


    Everyone from these guys:

    boston-bombing-heroes-responding_66467_6

    ..to these guys:

    everyday-heros-in-action-at-the-boston-m

    ..to these guys.

    166667269.jpg?w=480&h=320&crop=1
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 24, 2013 12:16 PM GMT
    http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2013/04/17/patriot-day-heroes-marathon-spectators-become-first-responders/8uoVeyShelDuUjKRUcDKyM/story.html

    Boston GlobeTwo days after the Boston Marathon bombing that left three dead and more than 170 injured, shaken survivors continued to share tales of terror and panic. But as those stories emerge, so do others: of heroism.

    As thousands fled the carnage, those near the blasts remember watching as dozens ran toward the chaos, looking to help however they could.

    John Cowin, 65, of Leesburg, Fla., was waiting to see his daughter, a breast cancer survivor running in her third Boston Marathon, when the second blast struck directly across the street. Instinctively, he jumped over the divider meant to keep spectators off the street and dashed toward what seemed like a sea of maimed bodies. “It seems like there were more people hurt in the first bomb but that the extent of the injuries was more severe where we were,” said Cowin, an orthopedic surgeon. “It looked like a scene from Afghanistan.”

    The first person he found was a father flailing in pain on the ground, his legs severed. Cowin said he tore off his belt, using it as a tourniquet as the man pleaded with him to check on his 3-year-old son, crying a few feet away.

    Cowin picked up the terrified boy, who was bleeding but not seriously injured, and then flagged down a police officer who shepherded the child to safety. “We needed to get him out of there,” Cowin said. “We needed to keep him from seeing his father like that.”

    Next, Cowin encountered two Boston University graduate students, one propped against a fence after being hit in the chest with shrapnel. Her friend lay unconscious a few feet away with a severe neck wound.

    Cowin tended to the first, as paramedics began unsuccessful attempts to resuscitate her friend, later identified as Lingzi Lu. “I’ve been calling the consulate ever since,” Cowin said Wednesday. “If it will help them at all, I just want her family to know that she didn’t suffer.”

    Even though he attended about half a dozen of the injured, Cowin rejects any characterization heralding him as a hero. Still, those hurt in the blasts insist it was volunteer first responders — in addition to hospital staffs — who saved lives.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 24, 2013 12:18 PM GMT
    Boston Globe“The police were doing the best they could, but it was other spectators who got to me first,” said Darrel Folkert, 42, of Redondo Beach, Calif., who suffered shrapnel injuries and burns to his legs as he waited to see his wife, running in her sixth marathon.

    Folkert, who underwent surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and is now back at home near Los Angeles, said spectators found him, carried him to safety, dressed his wounds, and helped him call his wife before handing him off to paramedics. “I can’t say enough how grateful I am for them,” Folkert said. “I was very fortunate.”
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 24, 2013 12:23 PM GMT
    Boston GlobeStanding feet from the Boston Marathon finish line, Kaitlynn Cates stretched to see past a large pink sign being held up by a young girl.

    “Let’s switch,” suggested her boyfriend of 10 months, as he moved to give the 25-year-old a less obstructed view, unknowingly placing her inches closer to the terror about to unfold.

    A moment later, the first of two deadly blasts threw the couple, who live in Boston, to the ground and sent pain searing through Cates’s now-bloodied right leg. Her calf was nearly blown off.

    Fearing a second blast, her boyfriend, 41-year-old Leo Fonseca, threw himself on top of her injured body. As Fonseca frantically debated what to do next, his attention was snatched by the sound of a second bomb exploding in the distance. Next came Cates’s screams. “Get me out! Get me out of here!”

    Fonseca lifted her in his arms and ran to his car, parked behind a restaurant about a block away. Once there, a stranger helped lift Cates into the car while another stranger cleared a path through the terrified hordes and the emergency vehicles arriving at the scene.

    Frantically driving the wrong way down Exeter and Beacon streets, Fonseca dodged police barricades and emergency workers as he sped the 2 miles to Massachusetts General Hospital, where nurses hurriedly moved Cates to the emergency room.

    “I don’t know if I would have made it if I would have had to wait for the emergency workers,” Cates said in an interview Wednesday, her voice slightly broken as she battled tears. “He was an absolute hero.”
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 24, 2013 12:35 PM GMT
    http://nation.time.com/2013/04/22/a-hero-among-heroes-a-boston-cops-story-at-the-marathon/

    TimeFor Thomas Barrett, a patrolman in the Boston Police, what happened last Monday, April 15, hasn’t sunk in yet. It’s too raw. He thinks it’ll be a while...

    Barrett’s instincts and training kicked in. The first person he approached, a man, was missing a leg. “His pants had been blown off. His shirt was on fire. Part of his body was still on fire,” he remembers. Barrett used his gloves to pat out the flames as a woman kneeling next to him tried desperately to stop the bleeding.

    At one point, Barrett went to undo his belt and fasten a makeshift tourniquet, but his radio and firearm got in the way. He asked the woman for her belt and purse strap, then tied them around the man’s upper right thigh. Before moving to another victim, he instructed her to keep applying pressure.

    After pinpointing another injured bystander, someone handed him a young boy and said “take care of him. You need to get this child out of here.” Barrett’s badge and fluorescent yellow vest gave him away as the one who could make it happen. The boy, dressed in a blue-green fleece and navy pants with twin white stripes, had strawberry-blond hair. It was streaked with blood.

    Barrett and the child didn’t speak to one another and never locked eyes. He grabbed the sides of the boy’s chest and held him like a football as he darted for the medical tent; the cradling wasn’t a safety maneuver, but rather a way to move quicker through the scrum of the wounded and the brave. A freelance photographer, Bill Hoenk, captured the moment.

    As the duo moved toward the white tent, which had been outfitted to assist runners with dehydration and muscular strains, Barrett stopped near Exeter Street and flagged down an ambulance. “He has a head injury,” he told a paramedic about the boy, unsure to what extent. His vest and jacket were bloodied.

    The paramedic strapped the boy into the back of the ambulance, then navigated the vehicle through the crowd to the site of the second blast to pick up more of the injured. Barrett ran back into the fray. It had been mere minutes since the explosions, and while victims recoiled in shock and agony, throngs of runners, spectators and volunteers rushed to help. People tapped Barrett on the shoulder and introduced themselves with “I’m a doctor” or “I’m a nurse,” he said, prompting a simple response: “Just jump in.”

    Within around 22 minutes, the most critically injured were moved out and routed to emergency rooms around the city. Barrett says he had “no concept” of time and experienced the chaos around him in slow motion. Two other victims were loaded into the ambulance with the boy before it raced to Massachusetts General Hospital. (Barrett is unaware of the child’s medical condition and his whereabouts.)...

    The attack will be remembered at future marathons, but so will the bravery of those who prevented it from being worse. “I saw a lot of people that probably should have run the opposite way and they didn’t,” Barrett says, recalling the uncertainty of other devices in the area. “They stayed.”

    It’s a moment of valor he won’t soon forget. Barrett borrows a quote about a character from Stephen Ambrose’s Band of Brothers to describe the experience: “His grandson asked him if he was a hero in the war, and he said, ‘No, I wasn’t. But I served in the company of heroes.’” Last Monday, Barrett thought similarly. “That day, everybody from my station was a hero. Everybody from the police department was a hero. And at that point, everybody in the city was a hero.”
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 24, 2013 12:41 PM GMT
    matt-patterson-600.jpg

    http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20692831,00.html

    [b]Matt Patterson, 30, an off-duty firefighter from Lynn, Mass., north of Boston, is among those looking to reconnect after helping to save a little boy who lost a leg in the bombings...

    A veteran of the war in Afghanistan, Patterson was in a nearby restaurant when the first bomb went off. "I knew it was bad when I heard it," he tells PEOPLE. "Anybody who served knows that feeling. I knew it wasn't right. It's a very specific sound."

    After pushing people "away from the windows," Patterson ran outside to see a little boy "laying in the street."

    Leaping over barriers to get to him, "I had tunnel vision – he was all I saw," says Patterson. "He had a complete amputation of his right leg. He said his name was 'Shawn' or 'Shane.' He was caucasian. He was in such shock, I don't even think he knew how hurt he was. I just kept trying to prevent him from looking down."

    With no time to spare, Patterson asked bystander Michael Chase, 34, who also ran into the street to help, for his belt to use as a tourniquet.

    The pair carried the boy to medics, then parted ways. It was the last Patterson saw of the child. He then ran to assist others, including Martin Richard, who perished, and a 30-year-old man who lost the lower part of one of his legs. "We made him a tourniquet from a shoelace," Patterson says.

    Now, Patterson and Chase are trying to find the little boy, with the hope that he's on the mend. "I just want to know that he's okay," says Patterson. "Just a phone call. That would be enough."

    "He's only about 7 years old," Patterson adds. "You never know; he could still grow up and run the marathon someday."[/b]
  • metta

    Posts: 39161

    Apr 25, 2013 7:35 PM GMT
    A Woman Lost Both Of Her Legs At The Boston Marathon. She Just Found A Reason To Smile.



    http://www.upworthy.com/a-woman-lost-both-of-her-legs-at-the-boston-marathon-she-just-found-a-reason-to-smile?c=upw1
  • metta

    Posts: 39161

    Apr 26, 2013 10:26 PM GMT
    Zubeidat Tsarnaeva, Bombing Suspect's Mom, Also On Terror List

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/26/zubeidat-tsarnaeva-terror-list_n_3164332.html