Mosque that Boston suspects attended has radical ties

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    Apr 25, 2013 1:42 PM GMT
    Have we become too politically correct (and possibly not tolerant enough in others?). Driving down to Boston last week, there was a discussion that pointed out that the discomfort about targeting some of these radical groups because "the US was built with radicals".

    This article is kind of frightening... reading through the laundry list of people who have come out of the same mosque these guys attended (you have to wonder how many other mosques like this are out there that we don't hear about?):

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/04/23/boston-mosque-radicals/2101411/

    Several people who attended the Islamic Society of Boston mosque in Cambridge, Mass., have been investigated for Islamic terrorism, including a conviction of the mosque's first president, Abdulrahman Alamoudi, in connection with an assassination plot against a Saudi prince.

    Its sister mosque in Boston, known as the Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center, has invited guests who have defended terrorism suspects. A former trustee appears in a series of videos in which he advocates treating gays as criminals, says husbands should sometimes beat their wives and calls on Allah (God) to kill Zionists and Jews, according to Americans for Peace and Tolerance, an interfaith group that has investigated the mosques.

    The head of the group is among critics who say the two mosques teach a brand of Islamic thought that encourages grievances against the West, distrust of law enforcement and opposition to Western forms of government, dress and social values.

    "We don't know where these boys were radicalized, but this mosque has a curriculum that radicalizes people. Other people have been radicalized there," said the head of the group, Charles Jacobs.

    Yusufi Vali, executive director at the Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center, insists his mosque does not spread radical ideology and cannot be blamed for the acts of a few worshipers.

    "If there were really any worry about us being extreme," Vali said, U.S. law enforcement agencies such as the FBI and Departments of Justice and Homeland Security would not partner with the Muslim American Society and the Boston mosque in conducting monthly meetings that have been ongoing for four years, he said, in an apparent reference to U.S. government outreach programs in the Muslim community.

    The Cambridge and Boston mosques, separated by the Charles River, are owned by the same entity but managed individually. The imam of the Cambridge mosque, Sheik Basyouny Nehela, is on the board of directors of the Boston mosque.

    Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and his brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, attended the Cambridge mosque for services and are accused of setting two bombs that killed three people and injured at least 264 others at the April 15 Boston Marathon.

    The FBI has not indicated that either mosque was involved in any criminal activity, but mosque attendees and officials have been implicated in terrorist activity:

    • Alamoudi, who signed the articles of incorporation as the Cambridge mosque's president, was sentenced to 23 years in federal court in Alexandria, Va., in 2004 for his role as a facilitator in what federal prosecutors called a Libyan assassination plot against then-crown prince Abdullah of Saudi Arabia. Abdullah is now the Saudi king.

    • Aafia Siddiqui, who occasionally prayed at the Cambridge mosque, was arrested in Afghanistan in 2008 while in possession of cyanide canisters and plans for a chemical attack in New York City. She tried to grab a rifle while in detention and shot at military officers and FBI agents, for which she was convicted in New York in 2010 and is serving an 86-year sentence.

    • Tarek Mehanna, who worshiped at the Cambridge mosque, was sentenced in 2012 to 17 years in prison for conspiring to aid al-Qaeda. Mehanna had traveled to Yemen to seek terrorist training and plotted to use automatic weapons to shoot up a mall in the Boston suburbs, federal investigators in Boston alleged.

    • Ahmad Abousamra, the son of a former vice president of the Muslim American Society Boston Abdul-Badi Abousamra, was identified by the FBI as Mehanna's co-conspirator. He fled to Syria and is wanted by the FBI on charges of providing support to terrorists and conspiracy to kill Americans in a foreign country.

    • Jamal Badawi of Canada, a former trustee of the Islamic Society of Boston Trust, which owns both mosques, was named as a non-indicted co-conspirator in the 2007 Holy Land Foundation terrorism trial in Texas over the funneling of money to Hamas, which is the Palestinian wing of the Muslim Brotherhood.

    What both mosques have in common is an affiliation with the Muslim American Society, an organization founded in 1993 that describes itself as an American Islamic revival movement. It has also been described by federal prosecutors in court as the "overt arm" of the Muslim Brotherhood, which calls for Islamic law and is the parent organization of Hamas, a U.S.-designated terrorist group.

    Critics say the Muslim American Society promotes a fraught relationship with the United States, expressed in part by the pattern discussed by Americans for Progress and Tolerance in which adherents are made to feel cut off from their home country and to identify with a global Islamist political community rather than with America.

    Zuhdi Jasser, president of the American Islamic Forum for Democracy, said the radical teachings often follow a theme of recitation of grievances that Islam has with the West, advocacy against U.S. foreign policy and terrorism prosecutions, and efforts "to evangelize Islam in order to improve Western society that is secularized," he says.
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    Apr 25, 2013 4:48 PM GMT
    riddler78 saidHave we become too politically correct (and possibly not tolerant enough in others?)
    Yes.

    Muslims need to go. The "radicalism rate" is too high to keep letting them over here.

    For those who keep screaming "freedom of religion," tell me just ONE religion (other than Muslim) that has so many ties to terrorism. You can't, because there are no others.
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    Apr 25, 2013 5:51 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    riddler78 saidHave we become too politically correct (and possibly not tolerant enough in others?)
    Yes.

    Muslims need to go. The "radicalism rate" is too high to keep letting them over here.

    For those who keep screaming "freedom of religion," tell me just ONE religion (other than Muslim) that has so many ties to terrorism. You can't, because there are no others.


    You can't nor should you get rid of people for what they believe... and there are plenty of moderates. But if you look at the treatment that Christians get versus say Muslims, it's as if we tiptoe around sensitive religious topics unless it's Christian. I have no idea what the solution is but values such as freedom of expression should apply also to Muslims/Islam and where there is conflict, values surrounding freedom of expression should take precedence.

    e.g. how some defended the muslim response to the publishing of the pictures of muhammad ...
  • musclmed

    Posts: 3284

    Apr 25, 2013 6:19 PM GMT
    unfortunately we have a situation where a family received asylum , public assistance and likely section 8 housing for almost a decade. And somehow it seemed to brew a distaste for the United states in the family.

    Again there is no figurehead of Islam to denounce these sort of actions. It maybe that they do not get the airtime or they are afraid or reprisal but I have heard little denunciation of the boston attacks.

    Its a bad situation. And it will likely cause knee jerk changes in policy and even effect the immigration bill.