Dear Hiring Managers!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 02, 2013 5:57 AM GMT
    Hey all,

    As my graduation is fast appoarching, I am actively looking for a job. I've already applied for about 10 jobs with 0 luck, but no biggie, there are many more listed at my school's career center website. While I have done great deal of research, practiced writing many resumes and cover letters, and utlized resources available to me at my school... I still have some questions left unanswered and thought it might be interesting to hear from the experts here on RJ. I believe that many members of this site will find this topic interesting, and with great input, will assist those currently unemployed to approach their job search in new ways.

    I guess my questions are directed at individuals working in a specific field: those who have recent or passed experience working as a hiring manager.

    -Is there anything specific that you look for in a resume? Besides work experience that directly related to the position, what else are you usually interested in seeing?
    -Should I always list my GPA?
    -Are you interested in seeing activities or other personal interests listed on the resume?
    -In other words, what do you think makes a resume stand out from the crowd?
    -Also, someone told me that its important to double space at beginning of each sentence in a cover letter. I find that hard to believe. Is it true? =D


    It is very easy to find resources online that advise you on how to write and format resumes and cover letters, but very rarely do you get direct input from those who interview and hire others for a living.

    I look forward to hearing from you!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 02, 2013 7:02 AM GMT
    I sometimes do applicant pre-screening and interviewing for our department. We rarely hire recent grads, but I'll try to answer your questions.

    -Is there anything specific that you look for in a resume? Besides work experience that directly related to the position, what else are you usually interested in seeing?

    ## A very well crafted resume. Spelling and grammar are important of course. Also, a logical organization of your previous experience. I've seen resumes where the applicants listed their experiences multiple times in different points of time. It's like they must have time traveled back n forth to work all these jobs at the same time.

    Also, this is just personal preference but I dislike it when people double-dip. Like if you got promoted during your time at XYZ Company, it's listed as a separate job experience. Don't feel embarrassed that you have little or no job experience. What matters is how long you were there and what you did during that time.

    -Should I always list my GPA?

    ## I don't care personally. But I've heard this might be common for recent grad entry level jobs.

    -Are you interested in seeing activities or other personal interests listed on the resume?

    ## Only if they're semi-related to the job. Like in my field, I like to see if applicants do any self learning of other programming languages. Also, if they contribute to any open source projects. I really don't care if a guy is the regional air guitar champ or enjoys taxidermy in his spare time.

    -In other words, what do you think makes a resume stand out from the crowd?

    ## I look for someone that is well rounded in their knowledge/experience. I don't want strictly book smart people. And I absolutely hate bullshitters that make themselves more important than they really are. Be honest in your resume. I'm not a fan of gimmicky resumes. One time, I got one that was in the form of an infograph. That might be fine for a design job, but not for job we hire for. So it went into the trash.

    -Also, someone told me that its important to double space at beginning of each sentence in a cover letter. I find that hard to believe. Is it true? =D

    ## It depends on the industry, but cover letters are no more. Unless the job description specifically asks for it, don't submit one. Also, almost all resumes are fed into an OCR and stored in a database. Be sure to use keywords in your resume that match the ones in the job description. Like if the job description says they're looking for someone with "kumquat farming" experience. Don't indicate that you have "fruit farming" experience. You better specifically say you have "kumquat farming" experience. Well, assuming you actually have that experience, that is.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 02, 2013 12:58 PM GMT
    A lot of what you're wanting to know is highly dependent on the field that you are entering. I can tell you what I know from screening when I was hiring for the housing department that I worked for. Also, I can tell you what has worked for me as a recent grad.

    -Is there anything specific that you look for in a resume? Besides work experience that directly related to the position, what else are you usually interested in seeing?
    *** Variability. It's great that you have a particular set of honed skills that you can market, but you should show that you are useful in more than one niche. I am an engineer by education, but by experience I can also do computer programming, supervisory roles, construction management, environmental management, etc.
    *** Teamwork. Very rarely are jobs performed 100% solo in any field. Show that you are a capable of working effectively on a team, and have examples ready should you land an interview.

    -Should I always list my GPA?
    *** Highly dependent on the field. A good rule of thumb though is if it's over a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale (or equivalent) list it, and don't if it's under. This is also more critical for recent grads. If you have a few years of experience in the field and good references, no one cares about your GPA.

    -Are you interested in seeing activities or other personal interests listed on the resume?
    *** Only if the activities display qualities desirable for the job. If their just for fun, those generally will be a good conversation topic for the interview. Your resume is a 500 ft high view of yourself to get your foot in the door. The interview is where you sell yourself and where the potential employee decides if you would be a good person to work with.

    -In other words, what do you think makes a resume stand out from the crowd?
    *** FORMATTING! If it flows easily for the eye, the person reading it will pay more attention. If you are a applying for a creative position, e.g. graphic design, do a creative resume.

    -Also, someone told me that its important to double space at beginning of each sentence in a cover letter. I find that hard to believe. Is it true? =D
    *** Most modern word processing applications do that for you automatically. Open up MS Word, set your font to Arial or TNR at 12 point, and you're good to go. What is more important is correct spelling and grammar.

    Hope this helps, and good luck!
  • FitGwynedd

    Posts: 1468

    May 02, 2013 2:17 PM GMT
    HR people are worthless idiot scumbags
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 02, 2013 2:25 PM GMT
    People always seem to get very excited about super enthusiastic applicants (although I personally find them a bit fake/annoying).

    One thing not to do is stretch the truth about qualifications you are studying for or planning to start studying for (ie don't say you have finished it or started it if you haven't). Also, if you got some of your work experience working for the family business, I would recommend not mentioning that it was a family business as people like me would think you were unlikely to be the best available candidate *opens can of worms*

    Finally, you can practice behavioural interview questions online and I recommend you do that. Hope that helps, good luck and don't get discouraged!
  • honestsweat

    Posts: 183

    May 02, 2013 2:28 PM GMT
    HR people are cogs in the machine looking for cookie-cutter applicants. If they could hire a person exactly like the person who just left they would. They're not paid to express creativity or give people a chance. They're the gatekeepers.

    Look for the people who are actually doing the hiring and, diplomatically, contact them.

    Create a LinkedIn profile and search for people with the job title you want.
    Buy a suit and tie and go to a professional event to network. (And make sure that suit and tie fits correctly so you don't look like a kid wearing your older brother's clothes. Marshall's is your friend.)

    Most importantly, let your resume show that you have real world experience and say it! Do an internship if you have not done one already. Volunteer at a nonprofit who will let you do something close to what you want to do for pay.

    Get time in the office under your belt. Few people want to hire an unknown commodity.
  • FitGwynedd

    Posts: 1468

    May 02, 2013 2:30 PM GMT
    honestsweat saidHR people are cogs in the machine looking for cookie-cutter applicants. If they could hire a person exactly like the person who just left they would. They're not paid to express creativity or give people a chance. They're the gatekeepers.

    Look for the people who are actually doing the hiring and, diplomatically, contact them.

    Create a LinkedIn profile and search for people with the job title you want.
    Buy a suit and tie and go to a professional event to network. (And make sure that suit and tie fits correctly so you don't look like a kid wearing your older brother's clothes. Marshall's is your friend.)

    Most importantly, let your resume show that you have real world experience and say it! Do an internship if you have not done one already. Volunteer at a nonprofit who will let you do something close to what you want to do for pay.

    Get time in the office under your belt. Few people want to hire an unknown commodity.


    +1. Also don't act overly intelligent. HR people are somewhat low on the intellectual totem pole and if you display too much intelligence they feel threatened.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 02, 2013 2:36 PM GMT
    Thanks for great feedback!

    Most of the questions I listed pertain to "suggestions" made on my schools website for those who either lack work experience or have enough space to fit it on the resume. I've wondered if its worthwhile listing those things on my own resume to maybe give it more personality or something.

    xrichx It depends on the industry, but cover letters are no more. Unless the job description specifically asks for it, don't submit one. Also, almost all resumes are fed into an OCR and stored in a database. Be sure to use keywords in your resume that match the ones in the job description.


    I never given much thought about OCR for scanning and storing resumes. I always try to adjust my resume to reflect the needs/requirements listed in the job description, but not always used same terms. As far as cover letters go, so far all job applications asked for one. Even the ones on job search engines seem to require them, either stated directly or it ends up being incorporated into the intro email with all the attachments.
  • ohioguy12

    Posts: 2024

    May 02, 2013 2:40 PM GMT
    Don't get too worried after applying to 10 jobs, it can take people weeks/months (even years) to find a decent job
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    May 02, 2013 3:01 PM GMT
    Spelling and grammar! You have a misused word in your question that makes me question your education. I'm not trying to be a dick here but pointing out that something like that on your resume would make me immediately trash your application. (I know spell and grammar check sometimes does that but it is your job to proof what you send me, not mine to excuse the error.) If I perceive you to be lazy in asking for the job, I'll assume you will be lazy on the job. Keep the resume to one page until you've been out of school for ten years. I don't care about part time jobs you did for money while in school. If you want to let me know you paid for your own education (a major accomplishment), just say so in your education section. GPA matters to me until you have a body of work I can gauge. If you have no relevant work experience, give me a sense of accomplishment in something you have done and preferably more than one example. I actually like a short list of interests, sports, activities. It gives me something to chat about that lets me determine if you're someone I want around. I once hired a girl for a six-figure job after a two hour interview in which we mostly talked about dogs. I figured I could check on her accomplishments listed in the resume with a background check and by talking to references. That's another thing: have a short list of references, who they are, what their relationship is to you, how to reach them.
  • FitGwynedd

    Posts: 1468

    May 02, 2013 3:09 PM GMT
    Destinharbor saidI once hired a girl for a six-figure job after a two hour interview in which we mostly talked about dogs.


    Holy shit thats irresponsible
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 02, 2013 3:13 PM GMT
    FitGwynedd said
    honestsweat saidHR people are cogs in the machine looking for cookie-cutter applicants. If they could hire a person exactly like the person who just left they would. They're not paid to express creativity or give people a chance. They're the gatekeepers.

    Look for the people who are actually doing the hiring and, diplomatically, contact them.

    Create a LinkedIn profile and search for people with the job title you want.
    Buy a suit and tie and go to a professional event to network. (And make sure that suit and tie fits correctly so you don't look like a kid wearing your older brother's clothes. Marshall's is your friend.)

    Most importantly, let your resume show that you have real world experience and say it! Do an internship if you have not done one already. Volunteer at a nonprofit who will let you do something close to what you want to do for pay.

    Get time in the office under your belt. Few people want to hire an unknown commodity.


    +1. Also don't act overly intelligent. HR people are somewhat low on the intellectual totem pole and if you display too much intelligence they feel threatened.


    HAHA! So true. They are also not the highest paid people in the company, which they resent and really enjoy sticking it to those paid more than they.

    HR people are relatively worthless that's why you see so many companies farming out their HR departments or computerizing so many of its functions.
  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    May 02, 2013 3:29 PM GMT
    FitGwynedd said
    Destinharbor saidI once hired a girl for a six-figure job after a two hour interview in which we mostly talked about dogs.


    Holy shit thats irresponsible

    YOU are calling ME irresponsible? I knew more about her after those two hours than any silly quiz about her resume. And I now know more about you than I wish I did. That you're a silly twit. Go back to your fry cooker.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 02, 2013 3:54 PM GMT
    DestinharborSpelling and grammar! You have a misused word in your question that makes me question your education. I'm not trying to be a dick here but pointing out that something like that on your resume would make me immediately trash your application. (I know spell and grammar check sometimes does that but it is your job to proof what you send me, not mine to excuse the error.) If I perceive you to be lazy in asking for the job, I'll assume you will be lazy on the job.


    Wow you are harsh... I wrote this at 2 in the morningicon_exclaim.gificon_lol.gif
    And you're right, it is very important to be literate and have good composition. Unfortunately english is my 2nd language, and even though I've lived in U.S for more than twelve years, my writing skills are not perfect and most likely never will be. I do make mistakes, I will second guess myself, and most likely won't spot some of the errors I've made.

    DestinharborKeep the resume to one page until you've been out of school for ten years. I don't care about part time jobs you did for money while in school. If you want to let me know you paid for your own education (a major accomplishment), just say so in your education section.


    I'm surprised that you have zero interest in part-time jobs being listed on the resume. Without those, my resume would be empty. Even if the most current job is not directly related to the position I'm applying for, doesn't it show dedication and work ethic of the applicant at hand?

    DestinharborGPA matters to me until you have a body of work I can gauge. If you have no relevant work experience, give me a sense of accomplishment in something you have done and preferably more than one example. I actually like a short list of interests, sports, activities. It gives me something to chat about that lets me determine if you're someone I want around.


    Good to know, I have been trying to do that. In my cover letter I try to give examples of projects I've worked on in courses related to my field of study and the job position itself.

    DestinharborI once hired a girl for a six-figure job after a two hour interview in which we mostly talked about dogs. I figured I could check on her accomplishments listed in the resume with a background check and by talking to references.


    You are strict and thorough, and yet lenient and compassionate.

    DestinharborThat's another thing: have a short list of references, who they are, what their relationship is to you, how to reach them.


    Good advice. I have a list of references already, I just need an opportunity to present them to future employers!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 02, 2013 4:14 PM GMT
    I'm not an HR person nor have I graduated, but I have landed some pretty good internship opportunities thus far and do have a couple of tips:

    - If handing resume out in person, use resume paper, not just a blank piece of regular paper, your resume 'will' stand out.

    - Go to your school's recruiting events, keep looking at the career center website, send those cover letters if requested, and also send a follow up email expressing your continued interest.

    - IMPORTANT: at your interview, ask for a business card. At the end of the day, or ASAP, send out an email Thank-You letter to the interviewer. MANY people forget to do this, therefore getting lost in the pool of applicants.

    - Have an elevator speech prepared. You can google it, but basically its like a 30 seconds speech you would use to introduce yourself to recruiters at career events, such as "Hello! My name is ----, I am currently majoring in --- and was interested in learning what opportunities your company has to offer for graduating seniors such as I"

    - Regarding your resume, ALWAYS have your GPA, and use your highest GPA between your overall and your major GPA, unless specified otherwise in the application process.

    - Interviews will consist of a lot of behavioral questions: "Tell me a time when you failed at a task, what was the outcome, how did you overcome this obstacle" or "Explain a time in which you had to speak in front of a big group of people".

    Hope that helps a bit!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 02, 2013 4:17 PM GMT
    musicbox89 saidHey all,

    As my graduation is fast appoarching, I am actively looking for a job. I've already applied for about 10 jobs with 0 luck, but no biggie, there are many more listed at my school's career center website. While I have done great deal of research, practiced writing many resumes and cover letters, and utlized resources available to me at my school... I still have some questions left unanswered and thought it might be interesting to hear from the experts here on RJ. I believe that many members of this site will find this topic interesting, and with great input, will assist those currently unemployed to approach their job search in new ways.

    I guess my questions are directed at individuals working in a specific field: those who have recent or passed experience working as a hiring manager.

    -Is there anything specific that you look for in a resume? Besides work experience that directly related to the position, what else are you usually interested in seeing?
    -Should I always list my GPA?
    -Are you interested in seeing activities or other personal interests listed on the resume?
    -In other words, what do you think makes a resume stand out from the crowd?
    -Also, someone told me that its important to double space at beginning of each sentence in a cover letter. I find that hard to believe. Is it true? =D


    It is very easy to find resources online that advise you on how to write and format resumes and cover letters, but very rarely do you get direct input from those who interview and hire others for a living.

    I look forward to hearing from you!


    Hire him, the boy's a cutie! icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 02, 2013 4:21 PM GMT
    musicbox89 saidHey all,

    As my graduation is fast appoarching, I am actively looking for a job. I've already applied for about 10 jobs with 0 luck, but no biggie, there are many more listed at my school's career center website. While I have done great deal of research, practiced writing many resumes and cover letters, and utlized resources available to me at my school... I still have some questions left unanswered and thought it might be interesting to hear from the experts here on RJ. I believe that many members of this site will find this topic interesting, and with great input, will assist those currently unemployed to approach their job search in new ways.

    I guess my questions are directed at individuals working in a specific field: those who have recent or passed experience working as a hiring manager.

    -Is there anything specific that you look for in a resume? Besides work experience that directly related to the position, what else are you usually interested in seeing?

    One page, concise and succinct. No spelling mistakes or grammar mistakes like others have said. If you do not have work experience, then cite those activities that might be related to the job.

    I am seeking a well rounded individually, also with critical thinking and analytical skills. It depends on the industry, but nobody want to hire a robot or a yes man. So tell me something you did outside the scope of a project that required that
    .





    -Should I always list my GPA?

    Not for my industry, I really do not care for it. Most important is that you graduated and you finished that shows you were able to complete and finish a task.


    -Are you interested in seeing activities or other personal interests listed on the resume?

    Yes, if its relates to the job. If it does not...like other have said I do not care to see them.

    -In other words, what do you think makes a resume stand out from the crowd?

    Bold Title of your name, You objective- what are you trying to achieve or get employed for. Also you have two seconds to grab my attention in a pile of 20 to 30 resumes that I reviewing. Tell me how you can be the better employee than any others.


    -Also, someone told me that its important to double space at beginning of each sentence in a cover letter. I find that hard to believe. Is it true? =D

    I do not care for cover letter, it depends on the industry...they usually end in the trash. I only want to see the resumes and from them I select the candidates that I want to bring for a face to face interview.


    It is very easy to find resources online that advise you on how to write and format resumes and cover letters, but very rarely do you get direct input from those who interview and hire others for a living.


    Also, you forgot one critical item of all of this that nobody has mentioned...practice, practice, practice...your interviewing skills...mimic role everything from shaking hands etc...key questions that a lot of candidates fail-

    (1) Why do you want to work for this company?
    (2) Why should I hire you?
    (3) Tell me something about yourself that stands out from others being (e.g. programmer, analyst, etc)
    the profession your applying for?
    (4) You mentioned you did this project of X, tell me about it? What did you learned from it? What did you learn about yourself that you did not know before?

    Most candidates fail because they fail to research the company, the role, and its objectives. You want a career NOT a job.

    Also body language is key - be confident and assured of what you want...I can sense and see when they are being dishonest or trying to bullshit around my questions...so in your career center again, put at least a couple of hours in act role an intervie
    w.


    I look forward to hearing from you!
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    May 02, 2013 4:24 PM GMT


    Finally, you can practice behavioural interview questions online and I recommend you do that. Hope that helps, good luck and don't get discouraged![/quote]

    This: Definitely Google Behavior Based Interview Questions.

    Practice them. You will find it very valuable.

    Also - someone said this. Show your resume to others to get fresh eyes. One spelling mistake can be a death knell.

    Finally, you should know how to sell your transferable skills. As a recent grad, you surely did extra curricular work that taught you something. Be proud of that and don't forget to mention it. It's important and shows balance, ambition and well-roundedness.

    Good luck!

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    May 02, 2013 4:51 PM GMT
    tanbod saidI'm not an HR person nor have I graduated, but I have landed some pretty good internship opportunities thus far and do have a couple of tips:

    - If handing resume out in person, use resume paper, not just a blank piece of regular paper, your resume 'will' stand out.

    - Go to your school's recruiting events, keep looking at the career center website, send those cover letters if requested, and also send a follow up email expressing your continued interest.

    - IMPORTANT: at your interview, ask for a business card. At the end of the day, or ASAP, send out an email Thank-You letter to the interviewer. MANY people forget to do this, therefore getting lost in the pool of applicants.

    - Have an elevator speech prepared. You can google it, but basically its like a 30 seconds speech you would use to introduce yourself to recruiters at career events, such as "Hello! My name is ----, I am currently majoring in --- and was interested in learning what opportunities your company has to offer for graduating seniors such as I"

    - Regarding your resume, ALWAYS have your GPA, and use your highest GPA between your overall and your major GPA, unless specified otherwise in the application process.

    - Interviews will consist of a lot of behavioral questions: "Tell me a time when you failed at a task, what was the outcome, how did you overcome this obstacle" or "Explain a time in which you had to speak in front of a big group of people".

    Hope that helps a bit!


    You make some great points. I went to two career fairs at my school. Most recent one had a lot more employers there than a year before. I received one job offer, but upon completion of application process they decided to look at other candidates. I don't know why, but in any case its time to move on to other opportunities.

    Any current college student seeking internships or entry level jobs should pay close attention to what you've said. There's little room for error, and trust me, you'll make quite a few (I know I did).
  • FitGwynedd

    Posts: 1468

    May 02, 2013 5:37 PM GMT
    Destinharbor said
    FitGwynedd said
    Destinharbor saidI once hired a girl for a six-figure job after a two hour interview in which we mostly talked about dogs.


    Holy shit thats irresponsible

    YOU are calling ME irresponsible? I knew more about her after those two hours than any silly quiz about her resume. And I now know more about you than I wish I did. That you're a silly twit. Go back to your fry cooker.


    I used to work in trucking, and trucks are expensive machines, so they make a good analogy. If my boss sent me out to buy a new truck, and gave me a budget of say $150,000 USD, i'm not going to decide what truck to buy based on pretty stripes and colours, or that it has a radio. I am going to scrutinise every aspect of function and performance of the truck before I buy it. If someone gave me a large sum of money, I would damn well make sure I am 100% positive that the truck can do the job that is required of it. Workforce, like trucks, are an investment, and if your talking to someone for 2 hours about dogs, thats tantamount to choosing a truck based on stripes or colours. A gross irresponsibility beyond the comprehension of most businessmen.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    May 02, 2013 5:59 PM GMT
    don't forget to include (near the beginning) that you're willing let him shoot in your mouth
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 02, 2013 6:08 PM GMT
    Destinharbor said
    FitGwynedd said
    Destinharbor saidI once hired a girl for a six-figure job after a two hour interview in which we mostly talked about dogs.


    Holy shit thats irresponsible

    YOU are calling ME irresponsible? I knew more about her after those two hours than any silly quiz about her resume. And I now know more about you than I wish I did. That you're a silly twit. Go back to your fry cooker.


    Don't be ridiculous. How do you think he's going to get a job cooking fries with that attitude? icon_rolleyes.gif
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    May 02, 2013 6:10 PM GMT
    Destinharbor said
    FitGwynedd said
    Destinharbor saidI once hired a girl for a six-figure job after a two hour interview in which we mostly talked about dogs.


    Holy shit thats irresponsible

    YOU are calling ME irresponsible? I knew more about her after those two hours than any silly quiz about her resume. And I now know more about you than I wish I did. That you're a silly twit. Go back to your fry cooker.


    So many people know what an interview wants to hear that they have pat answers to the pat questions interviewers ask. I've always found it better to get a person to feel so comfortable talking about a subject totally unrelated to the position that they let their guard down and I really get a feel for who they really are.

    The resume stuff can be verified through references.
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    May 02, 2013 6:20 PM GMT
    I've reviewed hundreds of resumes and hired dozens of people. I'm happy to share my experience.

    Some of the advice you have been given here is very good. Other advice is appropriate for someone further along in their career. Some of the advice just plain sucks. Use your judgement.

    One thing you can learn from the responses to your questions, I hope, is that every hiring manager has his or her own method. You can't please everyone. So the best advice is to be yourself. Don't pretend to be what the manager wants you to be. First, you don't know. Second, if he hires you, he was just hiring the character you played. He will be disappointed with the real you, and the real you won't be happy in the job. You're a good guy. Be yourself.

    Always follow the instructions in the job description to the letter. If they ask for a cover letter, include one. If they specifically ask you to double space the first line of a paragraph -- which makes absolutely no sense -- do it. (You probably misunderstood your friend.) If they ask for your GPA, include it.

    In the absence of explicit instructions, do what you can to stand out. Try to be interesting without being gimmicky. (uombroca) Tailor your materials to the specific job for which you are applying. An accountant's materials should not look like a graphic artist's. (Hawk_Guy13) Because you have very little experience, which is perfectly normal for someone just graduating, your instinct is correct. Include those other things. Make them sound work-related. Who knows, you and the hiring manager may have a common interest. Don't say you're better than the other applicants. Have you met them all? Demonstrate what you have to offer. Send a thank you note. (tanbod)

    What you have been told about keywords is correct. (xrichx) In larger companies, they may get hundreds or thousands of applications for each position, especially in economic times like these. HR's job, among other things, is to screen out 90% of them. It may sound tough, but no hiring manager wants to read 1,000 resumes. He depends on HR to whittle them down. You would be wise to treat them with respect. If you're very clever, you may find a way to contact the hiring manager directly (honestsweat), but chances are you will still have to interact with HR.

    Eliminate typos from your application materials; don't work for someone who would trash your resume because he found one typo. Your writing skills are excellent for someone for whom English is a second language -- and better than most native speakers.

    Don't get discouraged. You are just at the beginning of this process. (ohioguy12)

    I hope some of that helps. Good luck to you!
  • MarvelBoy23

    Posts: 279

    May 02, 2013 6:29 PM GMT
    UndercoverMan said
    Destinharbor said
    FitGwynedd said
    Destinharbor saidI once hired a girl for a six-figure job after a two hour interview in which we mostly talked about dogs.


    Holy shit thats irresponsible

    YOU are calling ME irresponsible? I knew more about her after those two hours than any silly quiz about her resume. And I now know more about you than I wish I did. That you're a silly twit. Go back to your fry cooker.


    So many people know what an interview wants to hear that they have pat answers to the pat questions interviewers ask. I've always found it better to get a person to feel so comfortable talking about a subject totally unrelated to the position that they let their guard down and I really get a feel for who they really are.

    The resume stuff can be verified through references.



    I agree. You get no sense of character from a resume. You get no sense of character from a GPA, or which school you graduated from.

    Also, just a point to FitGwynedd, an employee is less than a permanent structure as opposed to a 150k piece of machinery that you now own. I understand your points, but feel character speaks more highly of a person than anything else. How much are they willing to learn? How much are they willing to put into it? Do they own up to mistakes? These things are answers you'll get more from a personal conversation than with a formal interview!