I just wanna be Bigger(!)

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 02, 2013 1:50 PM GMT
    I've been lifting weights for the past few years, and I have seen some pretty impressive results. Recently I purchased Body Beast developed by BeachBody Inc. It's a decent program and I am impressed by the way my body has been reacting to it these last few weeks.

    Only being a third of the way through it, I'm seeing decent build, but I'm not seeing the density and mass in my muscle I see in some of my friends. Frankly; I have muscle, but they are only 'tight and hard' when I flex and I'm looking for a more uniform bulging look without the required flexing.

    Should I be taking a special supplement to help with this? I currently take ISOPURE http://www.theisopurecompany.com/ Whey Protein, Creatine & an Amino Fuel. I'm also slowly increasing my weights beyond anything I've lifted before, but may soon need to jump the 'home work out gym' for the actual.
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    Jun 21, 2013 5:56 AM GMT
    Its been a while since you posted and I can't tell if you're actually asking a question or making a general statement, but I'll take a stab at this... if not for you, maybe someone else will learn something! And sorry if this sounds elementary to you; its hard to answer this without an idea of your level of knowledge on the subject.

    A lot of guys run into this issue, not gaining that muscle fullness/size and only getting hard lean muscle definition. I experienced the same thing when I decided to really push myself in college... then I got lazy because I just wasn't getting the results I really wanted, so I joined a fraternity and learned to drink!

    Getting bigger is as much about lifting heavy weights as it is eating enough calories.(You're right, the home work out routine is only going to get you so far, because building bigger muscles requires you to constantly push your limits weight-wise, not with hour long endurance training!) Bodybuilders go through phases of bulking in which they literally consume 4000-5000 calories or more per day...trust me, when you do it right by swearing off fast food and loads of sugary junk (research clean bulking), its hard to eat enough actual food. You can suplement with protein and weight gainer shakes, if you really need to. I also suggest downloading a calorie tracking app like MyFitnessPal to track everything you consume in a day. It really helped me understand just how much I needed to eat for breakfast alone, if I was going to make it to 4000 calories by bed time.

    To figure out how much you should be eating, you need to calculate your TDEE (the daily number of calories required just to maintain what you have based on your normal engery expenditure). And to gain weight, you need to add a surplus to that number in the range of 500-1000 calories. The best, and I say only way to really calculate this involves knowing your current Lean Body Mass (Weight minus Body Fat). A trainer at any gym can tell you your Body Fat % using a caliper. Those scale readouts are pretty much crap.

    So there you go, a really quick answer to a very involved question! And I should also add, its virtually impossible to gain lean muscle mass effectively, and not put on a few extra pounds of fat in the process. But thats taken care of in a cutting phase afterwards in which you continue to lift as much as you can (to keep what you've diligently earned), increase your cardio and run your calories in a deficit (TDEE minus 500 calories or so).
  • Hunkymonkey

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    Jun 24, 2013 6:05 AM GMT
    I know where the original poster is coming from. I am an ectomorph and have the same type of compact muscles. I am strong, for sure, but I am just not built to have big full muscles on certain parts of my body, regardless of calories and chemicals. Genetics is why. Want a good example? Calves. Some guys got 'em, some don't.
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    Dec 07, 2013 7:03 PM GMT
    I too have those same issues.......I lift hard and eat a lot! Have always had a hard time gaining. I think I have overtrained for years. I am, however, quite strong! I think I am realizing that I must just need more sleep to really help the mass gains.........unless there are other hints out there?!?!
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    Dec 07, 2013 7:28 PM GMT
    Hunkymonkey saidI know where the original poster is coming from. I am an ectomorph and have the same type of compact muscles. I am strong, for sure, but I am just not built to have big full muscles on certain parts of my body, regardless of calories and chemicals. Genetics is why. Want a good example? Calves. Some guys got 'em, some don't.


    You look pretty huge to me, or your torso does, at least.
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    Dec 07, 2013 7:36 PM GMT
    yea i know what you meant. im been trying to put on mass for years now. i have an extremely high metabolism which doesn't require me to watch what i eat but at the same time, its very hard for me to put on weight. ive tried creatine, mass gainers, eating more but nothing worked to much avail. so guess i just have to wait for age to work its magic.
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    Dec 07, 2013 7:53 PM GMT
    Me too = I'm not a hard gainer at all actually fairly easy for me to gain muscle but I think I hold myself back because of fear of putting on too much fat at the same time
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    Dec 08, 2013 3:03 AM GMT
    Too get big:

    Eat right that includes meal timing not just nutrients.

    Get adequate sleep. Muscles grow when the body rests.

    Lift heavy ass weight. Don't worry about getting sore. If you lift heavy enough you will get sore. Soreness last a night time. Glory well that lasts longer.
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    Dec 08, 2013 3:17 AM GMT
    The answer is above there are two ways to get the results you want and they both require WORK

    1. Plan, measure, eat and track your meals. A body is built mainly in the kitchen with the forming of the muscles taking place in the gym if that makes any sense.

    2. You could get "gear" but I'm sure you're not considering that option so continue to work hard. Try different foods and proper sleep and rest cycles to see what works for you.
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    Dec 08, 2013 3:23 AM GMT
    Eating 4,000 - 5,000 calories a day isn't hard for me.. (it used to be).. What is hard is consistently doing it.

    I've gone from 165 - 180 since August, but only because I've been insane about tracking what I eat.

    I noticed when I don't that even if I mostly eat right, I have those days where I end up in a huge deficit and the net effect is being at maintenance calories for the week..
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    Dec 08, 2013 3:37 AM GMT
    SoCalBi saidIts been a while since you posted and I can't tell if you're actually asking a question or making a general statement, but I'll take a stab at this... if not for you, maybe someone else will learn something! And sorry if this sounds elementary to you; its hard to answer this without an idea of your level of knowledge on the subject.

    A lot of guys run into this issue, not gaining that muscle fullness/size and only getting hard lean muscle definition. I experienced the same thing when I decided to really push myself in college... then I got lazy because I just wasn't getting the results I really wanted, so I joined a fraternity and learned to drink!

    Getting bigger is as much about lifting heavy weights as it is eating enough calories.(You're right, the home work out routine is only going to get you so far, because building bigger muscles requires you to constantly push your limits weight-wise, not with hour long endurance training!) Bodybuilders go through phases of bulking in which they literally consume 4000-5000 calories or more per day...trust me, when you do it right by swearing off fast food and loads of sugary junk (research clean bulking), its hard to eat enough actual food. You can suplement with protein and weight gainer shakes, if you really need to. I also suggest downloading a calorie tracking app like MyFitnessPal to track everything you consume in a day. It really helped me understand just how much I needed to eat for breakfast alone, if I was going to make it to 4000 calories by bed time.

    To figure out how much you should be eating, you need to calculate your TDEE (the daily number of calories required just to maintain what you have based on your normal engery expenditure). And to gain weight, you need to add a surplus to that number in the range of 500-1000 calories. The best, and I say only way to really calculate this involves knowing your current Lean Body Mass (Weight minus Body Fat). A trainer at any gym can tell you your Body Fat % using a caliper. Those scale readouts are pretty much crap.

    So there you go, a really quick answer to a very involved question! And I should also add, its virtually impossible to gain lean muscle mass effectively, and not put on a few extra pounds of fat in the process. But thats taken care of in a cutting phase afterwards in which you continue to lift as much as you can (to keep what you've diligently earned), increase your cardio and run your calories in a deficit (TDEE minus 500 calories or so).
    .

    took me forever to learn this as you can see from my profile pic bulking and bloating but it will all be worth it in the end
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    Dec 08, 2013 3:39 AM GMT
    JimiB saidToo get big:

    Eat right that includes meal timing not just nutrients.

    Get adequate sleep. Muscles grow when the body rests.

    Lift heavy ass weight. Don't worry about getting sore. If you lift heavy enough you will get sore. Soreness last a night time. Glory well that lasts longer.


    This is great advice because its simple and most people don't even realize they're not doing it.

    I've read lots of studies that say timing isn't so important BUT in my experience, people that eat 3 typical "meals" a day can't pack in the calories needed so throw that traditional concept out of the window. Eat breakfast, eat dinner, and eat constantly in between.

    Sleep - no excuse. Do it. Treat it with the same priority you'd treat work and you'll sleep enough.

    And lastly and most importantly, don't fucking stand on a ball while you do dumbbell curls because you will NOT be lifting as heavy as you can. If you want to get big - lift heavy and properly. Leave the ridiculous fads at the door.

    Creatine is good for helping your muscles hold water and look a little fuller but really supplements are just that - supplements.
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    Dec 08, 2013 2:24 PM GMT
    Depending on how long and how serious you've been lifting, changes in diet, training and supplements will make little difference in how much lean mass you gain.

    Folks, stop giving advice as if you were talking to some beginner. Make the right questions first:

    - How long have you been lifting?
    - How much lean mass have you put on already?

    Facts everyone seems to overlook:

    - Even with perfect conditions of diet, training and rest, no one will gain muscle mass forever, there is a natural limit
    - Gains diminish considerably as you accumulate years of training, regardless of how well you do your homework (diet/training/rest)
    - The muscularity of magazine cover guys and porn stars is unattainable without chemical assistance, yet many nurture the vain hope that if they use this or that supplement, they will be able to overcome their natural limit

    If you have gained 30lbs to 40lbs of LEAN MASS without chemical assistance, accept that this is your natural limit and that there won't be any substantial changes from now on. If you still want more LEAN MASS after this point, you will have two options: accept your natural limit or use chemical assistance.
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    Dec 08, 2013 2:30 PM GMT
    leo_ said"I am alien to this forum". Well, I have a question here. All those who answered so far are well toned and look decently attractive and should be called muscled in all the ways. I wonder why would you need to be huge? I mean bigger than this? Because until you are in that profession all you need is a decent attractive and healthy body.


    Well in my case I am in a profession where it is def an asset to be big. However i personally have gone through every stage imaginable. I was a fat unattractive kid in hs. Then in college i lost weight quickly and became so skinny was thought to be anoerexic ( probably spelled wrong). I lost weight too quickly and was left with loose skin that is still there but not as bad. Now I am trying to bulk correctly by gaining 1 lb a week . I know right now i look bloated and def worried about putting on fat but I also know if i get up to 230 and then cut i will have a better chance of looking like i workout instead of looking emanciated from too much cardio. I am willing to sacrifice to be better at the end. Bigger, better, stronger.
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    Dec 09, 2013 1:06 PM GMT
    Watch the 'getting bigger' because you'll reach a point of no return and your heart still has to pump through all of that.