What do you look for in a dojo and in a Sensei

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 10, 2013 3:06 AM GMT
    Anyone who has seen this video.........................................




    did you ever wonder what convinced these students to practice under this sensei? (hehe did he lose the battle on purpose to keep his techniques a secret?) lol who knows, but in all seriousness

    I honestly just took a chance when I first walked into my Goju Ryu dojo. No background or research. I just heard through the Grapevine that Sensei Gotay was the man to see and I went for him. Thankfully I benefited studying under him but how about you guys?


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    May 10, 2013 6:50 AM GMT
    Martial arts cover a wide spectrum. I'd compare this to medicine... You have doctors MD and science, and then you have crystal healers, aura healers and whatnot.
  • Kairr

    Posts: 239

    May 10, 2013 7:34 AM GMT
    tmac saidAnyone who has seen this video.........................................








    Looks legit ... (-. - )
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    May 10, 2013 8:01 AM GMT
    When I had studied martial arts in the past, I looked for instructors who could speak comprehensible English, first and foremost.
  • Drift

    Posts: 217

    May 10, 2013 10:21 AM GMT
    The question is one thing, that video is another.

    When you delve into any practice, what are you doing, and what is your intent? When a person agrees to teach you of a practice, what have you both agreed to? What is the difference between a teacher and a master?

    Martial arts is not just about fighting. I think if the intent is to become proficient in self defense or sparring/duelling, then of course that must be addressed, and well. But I would question a method that focused completely on that one aspect.
    There is health, safety, respect, patience, duty, courage, self determination, community building, etc.

    Choosing a master and community is partly about knowing how you value each of these things, and along what path you wish to walk, and with whom.




    The video? Haha, I'm currently studying Daoyin from a crazy man who is reputed to be able to use 'empty force', and throw people around like in that video. I'll believe it when I feel it, but, I keep my mind open to the possibility, definitely. I feel things following his exercises that I haven't done with other exercises. Maybe one day I'll be Yoda... ;)
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    May 10, 2013 11:01 AM GMT
    Ameri-do-te looks awesome
















    icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 10, 2013 11:58 AM GMT
    hehe of course it's not about beating people up and i'm open to believing in the possibility of empty force as well because that would just be epic.

    As far as the video, apparently the Kiai master accepted a challenge saying that his power was above that of an MMA fighter or something. I'll have to look it up again. His students seemed to believe in him. I guess i'm wondering why he'd agreed to this .
  • Drift

    Posts: 217

    May 10, 2013 3:18 PM GMT
    Hehe his power may be greater. Could also have terrible stage fright. icon_razz.gif looked like the other guy punched him in the face a few times. Ouchies.
  • SkyMiles

    Posts: 963

    May 11, 2013 12:09 AM GMT
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  • iTommy

    Posts: 11

    May 11, 2013 1:48 AM GMT
    Luck.

    Sensei at U of MN, where I did my undergrad, is the highest-ranked non-Japanese teacher/practitioner of Karate in the world.
    http://www.tc.umn.edu/~karate/instructors.html

    http://www.karatevid.com/article-fusaroNat.htm
    (since that article was written, Sensei Fusaro has achieved 8th Dan in 2010)

    Learning Karate as an adult was an especially humbling experience for me - I think I'd need to practice for longer to really know


    First week at Sensei's dojo is free, if anyone who lives near Minneapolis is interested.

    http://www.midwestkarate.org/
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 11, 2013 12:26 PM GMT
    Drift saidHehe his power may be greater. Could also have terrible stage fright. icon_razz.gif looked like the other guy punched him in the face a few times. Ouchies.


    hehe I could die a happy man if I even had half of this power


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    May 11, 2013 12:56 PM GMT
    As someone upthread said, it is all in what specific aspect of martial arts you seek training in.

    The typic Tiger Schulmann McDojo is great for introducing kids or people very new to martial arts. Qi Gong/Tai Chi might be good for elders or people with minor mobility issues - it's less about showy moves and breaking pine boards and collecting a rainbow of belts as it is about developing inner focus and mastery of your own body (propioception)

    And for guys interested in the competitive combat arts - then MMA is a good avenue.

    I have a keen interest in sword arts - especially the koryū (old styles) such as Hokushin Ittō Ryū. Koryū disciplines differ from kendo (way of the sword) which was largely neutered from the pre-1945 kenjutsu (sword art)... and koryū schools typically taught a variety of sub disciplines (such as grappling and spear and archery techniques, though the main focus came back to the sword).

    Koryū schools also would include some degree of focus on sword drawing (iaidō) and single-strike techniques (battōjutsu). They also use wooden swords (boken) or steel blades (shinken) whereas kendō is largely limited to bamboo swords (shinai) ... which will certainly leave a mark on unprotected skin, but has significantly different handling properties, balance and weighting.

    The only bother about all this is that kendō has become a victim of McDojo-ism, and finding a koryū dojo outside of Japan that teaches the disciplines as passed down from its master (shihan/sōke) is a very rare thing indeed.
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    May 13, 2013 12:43 AM GMT
    AlphaTrigger saidAs someone upthread said, it is all in what specific aspect of martial arts you seek training in.

    The typic Tiger Schulmann McDojo is great for introducing kids or people very new to martial arts. Qi Gong/Tai Chi might be good for elders or people with minor mobility issues - it's less about showy moves and breaking pine boards and collecting a rainbow of belts as it is about developing inner focus and mastery of your own body (propioception)

    And for guys interested in the competitive combat arts - then MMA is a good avenue.

    I have a keen interest in sword arts - especially the koryū (old styles) such as Hokushin Ittō Ryū. Koryū disciplines differ from kendo (way of the sword) which was largely neutered from the pre-1945 kenjutsu (sword art)... and koryū schools typically taught a variety of sub disciplines (such as grappling and spear and archery techniques, though the main focus came back to the sword).

    Koryū schools also would include some degree of focus on sword drawing (iaidō) and single-strike techniques (battōjutsu). They also use wooden swords (boken) or steel blades (shinken) whereas kendō is largely limited to bamboo swords (shinai) ... which will certainly leave a mark on unprotected skin, but has significantly different handling properties, balance and weighting.

    The only bother about all this is that kendō has become a victim of McDojo-ism, and finding a koryū dojo outside of Japan that teaches the disciplines as passed down from its master (shihan/sōke) is a very rare thing indeed.


    interesting perspective
  • chann223

    Posts: 24

    Jul 09, 2014 3:28 AM GMT
    AlphaTrigger saidAs someone upthread said, it is all in what specific aspect of martial arts you seek training in.

    The typic Tiger Schulmann McDojo is great for introducing kids or people very new to martial arts. Qi Gong/Tai Chi might be good for elders or people with minor mobility issues - it's less about showy moves and breaking pine boards and collecting a rainbow of belts as it is about developing inner focus and mastery of your own body (propioception)

    And for guys interested in the competitive combat arts - then MMA is a good avenue.

    I have a keen interest in sword arts - especially the koryū (old styles) such as Hokushin Ittō Ryū. Koryū disciplines differ from kendo (way of the sword) which was largely neutered from the pre-1945 kenjutsu (sword art)... and koryū schools typically taught a variety of sub disciplines (such as grappling and spear and archery techniques, though the main focus came back to the sword).

    Koryū schools also would include some degree of focus on sword drawing (iaidō) and single-strike techniques (battōjutsu). They also use wooden swords (boken) or steel blades (shinken) whereas kendō is largely limited to bamboo swords (shinai) ... which will certainly leave a mark on unprotected skin, but has significantly different handling properties, balance and weighting.

    The only bother about all this is that kendō has become a victim of McDojo-ism, and finding a koryū dojo outside of Japan that teaches the disciplines as passed down from its master (shihan/sōke) is a very rare thing indeed.


    I think I have an interest in swords as well, but at the moment I'm practicing a style that doesn't focus on that. I don't know why, but swords have always held a fascination for me, especially the Japanese sword.