Nausea, Dizziness and oral projectiles from working out.

  • eckilegs

    Posts: 223

    Sep 06, 2007 7:11 PM GMT
    Hey guys,
    I'm getting back into my routine of working out, and I had a question of something that happens to me sometimes when I exercise. If you don't like projectile stories, don't read on. I just want to know if there may be more to it than I think?

    Occasionally, after a workout, I sometimes feel dizzy. I usually attribute this to not having enough nutrients or anything to eat recently and assume it's my body telling me I need energy. Am I right to assume that?

    Today, I was in my weight training class (1 credit course for fun). Usually the instructor lets us go early, but I always stay for the whole time. Today, I left early. I suddenly felt the sensation that I may have to throw up, Which has never happened before. I wasn't feeling dizzy, just nauseous. Is the source of the nausea and dizziness the same? Is it due to lack of nutrients that I felt this way? Are there any other common causes for this feeling?

    Lastly, Over the summer, I used to get friends together to play volleyball. Being Vegas, it was obviously very hot during the day. I don't like everything they have in gatorade, So I tried to stay hydrated with water. Long story short, after 3 hours, despite having over a gallon of water, I still became VERY dizzy and had to have a friend drive me home, only to stop half-way there to jump out of the car and throw up. I thought this was just symptomatic of getting dehydrated since it wasn't food I was throwing up, but when I took a nutrition class over the summer, my instructor informed me that it isn't something that should happen. Any insight?

    Thanks guys.
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    Sep 06, 2007 7:49 PM GMT
    Well the volleyball thing sounds like heat exhaustion, but the symptoms of hyponatremia (too much water and not enough salt) can be similar.

    I've heard of people needing to eat some carbs before weightlifting, to avoid nausea from low blood sugar, but there could be all sorts of other causes too.
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    Sep 06, 2007 7:49 PM GMT
    I think that it could be hypoglycemia. It means that your blood sugar gets too low...it might explain the dizzyness and nausea.

    When your in a middle of a crisis of hypoglycemia, are you having diffculty to concentrate ?

    If so, that might be it. At that moment, you have to eat something with sugar, as fast as you can and after you feel better, eat something with proteins. Proteins help to keep the blood sugar more constant.

    I hope this will help you.

    Michel
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    Sep 06, 2007 8:46 PM GMT
    GO TO A DOCTOR....dont get advice here....get the advice of a medical professional. Its not normal and you should find out what is the cause sooner rather than later.
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    Sep 06, 2007 10:04 PM GMT
    Doctor is good advice. It may just reassure you if nothing else. Also dont forget to let us know the outcome! Good Health!
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    Sep 06, 2007 10:53 PM GMT
    GO TO A DOCTOR....get the advice of a medical professional. That should not be happening during or after the kinds of light/moderate activity you are describing.

    You stated however that you don't like everything in Gatorade, so you try to hydrate with water.

    Have you ever tried GA shortly after eating or when you were relaxed and not doing anything physical? Frankly it tastes like watered down horse piss.

    When you have really worked out heavily though, you grab a cup and - TOTALLY DIFFERENT flavor. It tastes like the greatest stuff in the world. Part of that effect is because of the sodium and electrolytes it replenishes.

    Your body is telling you that you NEED that stuff.

    ---------------------------------------------

    As almost a seperate issue.

    Under EXTREME workout conditions - like those encountered by a Iron man tri athlete, an Army Ranger or Special Forces Unit, Navy SEALS, ELITE professional athletes, etc ; vomiting during or after an intense workout is not unusual.

    Nutrition under those circumstances is.... more specialized.

    Been there, Done that. I submit that you can't maintain that level of intensity indefinately; and certainly not while maintaining another life. It is something you can only do for a few (12) years at best.

    It is (or used to be) a favorite trick among basic training non coms to bring their classes into the dining hall and let them fill up on something heavy - like spaghetti and meatballs - then almost immediately take them on a 20 mile uphill RUN with 100# packs in the afternoon sun. The results are inevitable. But it teaches the recruits something too - it gives them a memorable lesson in how their bodies work, the art of moderation, and how to adjust their diet to their physical requirements.

    Rob
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    Sep 06, 2007 11:36 PM GMT
    re: "Under EXTREME workout conditions - like those encountered by a Iron man tri athlete, an Army Ranger or Special Forces Unit, Navy SEALS, ELITE professional athletes, etc ; vomiting during or after an intense workout is not unusual."

    Maybe things have changed, but when I was in high school, anyone who didn't puke during the first week of football practice "wasn't really trying."

    Man, I hated those coaches.

    Heat Exhaustion is also quite a common problem anywhere that people work outside in the arid west - people should recognize it and be on the lookout.

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    Sep 07, 2007 1:25 AM GMT
    MG -

    Chuckle, now that brings back memories. I too remember a lot of kids puking - primarily because they had let themselves get soft all summer.

    I hoped those were just the 'bad old days' I remember however.

    R

  • eckilegs

    Posts: 223

    Sep 07, 2007 5:41 AM GMT
    Thanks for the input guys. I was already planning to go to the Dr. next week for a routine checkup. So I'll definitely bring that up when I get in there. I know that its not wise to take advice here and apply as certainty. Going to a Doctor is obviously the best bet, and I appreciate you guys for your responses and sincerity.

    caporalpunition, I have been told in the past that this could be linked to hypoglycemia. I guess I just brushed it off because I thought as a person with a fast metabolism, I just needed to eat more. I DO however sometimes have difficulty concentrating.

    As far as the GA, it's what's actually in it that makes me not want to drink it. I don't mind the taste at all. I know that there are alternatives for getting essential nutrients. I go to the Doctor and that turns out to be the problem, then I'll look into those.
  • Salubrious

    Posts: 420

    Sep 10, 2007 11:20 PM GMT
    MG and ITJ: I can safely say that it's continued to this day, though on a smaller scale. They didn't expect everyone to puke, heh.

    To the OP: I have gotten this twice, but it only really happens when I'm swimming. I'm not sure why, but swimming really does it to me.
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    Sep 23, 2007 4:28 AM GMT
    It has only happened to me on four occasions. Twice it was while I was doing lap swimming. After several laps I got extreme pains/cramps in my stomach and I had just enough time to get out of the pool and find the nearest trash can.

    The last time I had a strong wave of dizziness and nausea was when I was stupid enough to do a heavy lifting workout on a completely empty stomach. I learned my lesson from that experience and always eat an hour or two before working out.
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    Oct 12, 2007 3:54 AM GMT
    Very intense workouts dramatically increase lactic acid levels in your body. Your body doesn't really fair well with this, so you'll oftentimes feel nauseated and dizzy. And if there is way too much lactic acid build up, your body will actually try to throw it up.

    However, if you're experiencing these symptoms randomly and after not-so-intense workouts, then do see a doctor.
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    Oct 12, 2007 5:06 AM GMT
    I remember in high school one of our rivalswim teams had buckets next to the pool for there athletes to puke in after a race. If you over exert yourself you are likely to puke
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    Oct 12, 2007 5:38 AM GMT
    I've done that before, and though I can't say for certain I'm guessing it's some sort of vaso-vagal or autonomic response for the most part, and probably nothing too serious. Dehydration of course is serious, and yes, hydrate, hydrate, hydrate.
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    Jul 29, 2010 2:19 PM GMT
    I have been dealing with the same thing and I think it's just blood sugar crash.

    What I'm curious to know is, how come you manage to over do yourself so that you throw up. Why doesn't the body tell you to stop before that. Or is that maybe the way the body is telling you to stop?