Any buddhists here?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 12, 2013 1:03 PM GMT
    Hey guys =) any buddhists here?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 12, 2013 7:02 PM GMT
    Right here
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 12, 2013 7:11 PM GMT
    Yup. I study at Spirit Rock.
  • KJayasuriya

    Posts: 1253

    May 12, 2013 7:12 PM GMT
    I am a Buddhist. icon_smile.gif
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    May 12, 2013 7:12 PM GMT
    I've read books on Buddhism, and it has added another dimension to my understanding of Christianity.
  • New_Life

    Posts: 11

    May 13, 2013 1:56 AM GMT
    Nichiren Daishonin - SGI-USA
  • aus_Sean36

    Posts: 31

    May 13, 2013 2:07 AM GMT
    Certainly a very strong buddhist leaning here.
  • BlackBeltGuy

    Posts: 2609

    May 13, 2013 2:08 AM GMT
    Nichiren Daishonin- nam myoho renge kyo ;)
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    May 13, 2013 2:29 AM GMT
    Right here, Buddhist! Mahayana.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    May 13, 2013 3:00 AM GMT
    This thread needs some nudist buddhists.
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    May 13, 2013 3:01 AM GMT
    mahayana nichiren here
  • He_Man

    Posts: 906

    May 13, 2013 3:22 AM GMT
    I appreciate some Buddhist philosophy and teachings, the contemplative lifestyle and I love Buddhist artwork and meditation, but I wouldn't declare myself a "Buddhist."

    As the Buddhist master Lin Chi said, "If you meet the Buddha on the road, kill him." Too many people turn the Buddha's teachings into a religion or ideology and miss the whole point of what the Buddha was trying to teach. It's as if we are following the Buddha down a path, and all of a sudden, he stops and points to an object on the side of the road, but instead of us actually looking at where he's pointing to, we're too busy starring at the tip of his finger.

    I see Buddha as one of the first skeptics and natural philosophers. If he was born today, I could see him being a scientist focusing on physics and neuroscience, trying to unlock the mysteries of reality and how the mind interprets reality.


    "Believe nothing on the faith of traditions,
    even though they have been held in honor
    for many generations and in diverse places.
    Do not believe a thing because many people speak of it.
    Do not believe on the faith of the sages of the past.
    Do not believe what you yourself have imagined,
    persuading yourself that a God inspires you.
    Believe nothing on the sole authority of your masters and priests.
    After examination, believe what you yourself have tested
    and found to be reasonable, and conform your conduct thereto." - Buddha
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    May 13, 2013 3:34 AM GMT
    Can a Buddhist be anywhere?
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    May 13, 2013 1:00 PM GMT
    Hello all =) happy to see your replies, wishing all of you well, happy and peaceful

    He_Man saidI appreciate some Buddhist philosophy and teachings, the contemplative lifestyle and I love Buddhist artwork and meditation, but I wouldn't declare myself a "Buddhist."

    As the Buddhist master Lin Chi said, "If you meet the Buddha on the road, kill him." Too many people turn the Buddha's teachings into a religion or ideology and miss the whole point of what the Buddha was trying to teach. It's as if we are following the Buddha down a path, and all of a sudden, he stops and points to an object on the side of the road, but instead of us actually looking at where he's pointing to, we're too busy starring at the tip of his finger.

    I see Buddha as one of the first skeptics and natural philosophers. If he was born today, I could see him being a scientist focusing on physics and neuroscience, trying to unlock the mysteries of reality and how the mind interprets reality.


    "Believe nothing on the faith of traditions,
    even though they have been held in honor
    for many generations and in diverse places.
    Do not believe a thing because many people speak of it.
    Do not believe on the faith of the sages of the past.
    Do not believe what you yourself have imagined,
    persuading yourself that a God inspires you.
    Believe nothing on the sole authority of your masters and priests.
    After examination, believe what you yourself have tested
    and found to be reasonable, and conform your conduct thereto." - Buddha


    Is that from the Kalama sutta? Haha I believe it means to not just blindly believe what we see and here but to investigate it, right?
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    May 13, 2013 1:01 PM GMT
    LJay saidCan a Buddhist be anywhere?


    What do you mean?
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    May 13, 2013 6:10 PM GMT
    soybean1 said
    LJay saidCan a Buddhist be anywhere?


    What do you mean?


    I took that as a literal joking around with your question "any Buddhists here" possibly tangentially combined with the old joke about Buddhists and hot dogs "I'll have one with everything" and its implied non-locality.

    To your question. I'm a twentyplus year student of Dzogchen, a lifetime practitioner of dream yoga but adherent to none.

    Question for you, I see in your profile that you are in Malaysia which I thought to be mostly Muslim and I think I recall reading about conflict between the Muslims in Malaysia with Buddhists in southern Thailand.

    Do you find that as a Buddhist you are able to live in relative peace where you are or is it like being non-Christian in the United States, tolerable but occasionally annoying.
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    May 14, 2013 12:07 AM GMT
    HottJoe saidThis thread needs some nudist buddhists.
    Those are called "Booty-ists." Get your facts right!
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    May 14, 2013 12:19 AM GMT
    theantijock said
    soybean1 said
    LJay saidCan a Buddhist be anywhere?


    What do you mean?


    I took that as a literal joking around with your question "any Buddhists here" possibly tangentially combined with the old joke about Buddhists and hot dogs "I'll have one with everything" and its implied non-locality.

    To your question. I'm a twentyplus year student of Dzogchen, a lifetime practitioner of dream yoga but adherent to none.

    Question for you, I see in your profile that you are in Malaysia which I thought to be mostly Muslim and I think I recall reading about conflict between the Muslims in Malaysia with Buddhists in southern Thailand.

    Do you find that as a Buddhist you are able to live in relative peace where you are or is it like being non-Christian in the United States, tolerable but occasionally annoying.


    Ooo icic

    Haha how well read of you, its relatively peaceful here, if I am not wrong, the incident you read about was quite some time ago and only involved some people in the borders
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    May 14, 2013 1:43 AM GMT
    Obviously.
  • psycsnacha

    Posts: 161

    May 14, 2013 1:55 AM GMT
    For the buddhists, what made you commit to buddism as opposed to being "spiritual" and undefined?
  • Lincsbear

    Posts: 2605

    May 14, 2013 2:28 AM GMT
    I agree with some of the guys above about being influenced by Buddhism rather than being a complete adherent. As someone who really loves nature, I particularly note its emphasis on compassion to all living creatures, not just other humans; how this improves things for all of us.

    I find it one of the most austere of religions /spiritual traditions, and yet ultimately liberating of all earthly fears and constraints.
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    May 14, 2013 2:32 PM GMT
    psycsnacha saidFor the buddhists, what made you commit to buddism as opposed to being "spiritual" and undefined?


    Haha well my family are buddhists and I grew up going to buddhist sunday school, when I got older and really got to understand it, I appreciated it more. So, now I just continue learning what I can
  • psycsnacha

    Posts: 161

    May 14, 2013 2:49 PM GMT
    soybean1 said
    psycsnacha saidFor the buddhists, what made you commit to buddism as opposed to being "spiritual" and undefined?


    Haha well my family are buddhists and I grew up going to buddhist sunday school, when I got older and really got to understand it, I appreciated it more. So, now I just continue learning what I can


    Ah, you were fortunate to grow up with a religion that did not conflict with who you were intrinsically. Cheers. I moved away from an orthodox christian denomination (JW's) and am finding both philosophical and spiritual influence from a variety of timeless sources, Buddhism included. Yet, given my history with religion, I'm a bit hesitant to commit to any once form of "truth." That being said, a good friend of mine is a Buddhist and our conversations resonate deeply.
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    May 14, 2013 3:10 PM GMT
    Haha ahh I guess I can see why you would be be hesitant, just take your time to find something that can bring you peace and a better understanding of the world

    For me, what I really enjoy and appreciate about the buddha's teachings are things like compassion and not harming other beings, having to investigate his teachings instead of blindly accepting haha
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    May 14, 2013 3:54 PM GMT
    soybean1 saidOoo icic

    Haha how well read of you, its relatively peaceful here, if I am not wrong, the incident you read about was quite some time ago and only involved some people in the borders


    I'm really not that well read. I actually don't recall precisely why I even knew that. Possibly from when I was considering an expat life in SE Asia. One of my major reasons for considering living in Thailand is for the Buddhism. Though I don't necessarily lean towards their schools of thought, they gotta be closer to how I think than most Americans. I often find myself at odds with how people think here and I sometimes fantasize not being daily inundated by that dissonance. For now I'll just rely on inner experience over outward circumstance.

    Glad to hear you've some measure of peace there. I considered Malaysia as well but I think, being gay, Thailand might feel more welcoming if I ever decide to do that. For now I remain a little jealous of you that you get to live in such a beautiful part of the world.

    psycsnacha saidFor the buddhists, what made you commit to buddhism as opposed to being "spiritual" and undefined?


    On first glance it looks odd to think of committing to a religion centered on no attachment, and of most people I know who are deeply involved in Buddhism, I don't know that they would describe themselves as committed. Maybe they would but maybe I just wouldn't describe it that way. I'm not sure really. I'll have to ask. Though I was involved years back in a type of commitment ceremony at the request of a friend and I played my role for him though the entire time I was thinking to myself: this is bullshit. But then I did the same thing in Hebrew school for my parents for five years so I'm used to those outward circumstances.

    I would think from my experience with American Buddhists that often we take the religion more as a side dish than a main course--potato salad Buddhism--even if having a side dish for the main meal. I've a cousin, really smart & nice, who's very involved in Buddhism--was a monk and officer at Tassajara many years ago, friends with Thich Nhat Hahn for most of his life, wife is a distinguished meditation teacher, etc--so about as deeply involved in the Sangha as you could get, yet I'm pretty sure he considers at least in part that he's still Jewish.

    I was drawn to knowing about Buddhism both from my friendship with my cousin who was able to guide me more earlier on though he now tells me I'm beyond his depths, and because of my early dreaming experience, before western science started catching up, when mostly the pertinent information available was only to be found in Buddhist and other eastern texts, which I was so thankful for because otherwise I had no explanation for what I was experiencing.

    One of the wonderful things about Buddhism is that you don't have to give up who you otherwise are as it can function as a philosophy, a way of thinking, a procedure, perhaps, of investigating thought, without taking on all the dogmatic religiosity of what it also can be.

    You can do that also in studying the mystic aspects of the major religions and native cultures which I've done--always studying, never joining--but I found so much more intelligence with so much less bullshit in Buddhism than I did in the others. Some of the dogmatic stuff is so foreign to western thought though that you really just have to read past that stuff. Read beyond it. Read everything as metaphor, which is the best way to study any religion anyway.

    Another thing about your comment on commitment that strikes a note in me is that I've noticed two general types of seekers. One will believe anything. They bop around from religion to religion, completely commit themselves and then move on to another. The social butterflies of spirituality. These are those who seek to delude themselves with the illusion of enlightenment and more often of being saved in some way.

    The other seeker is not a seeker of ultimate truth, nor of salvation, not of "the answer", but of understanding, of finding ways of thinking clearly and considerately. Without the need to commit to anything, yet unwavering--that this train of thought is not just a convenience but that it is the way--they are the bodhisattva.