Supermarket frozen meals....

  • HPgeek934

    Posts: 970

    May 14, 2013 2:15 AM GMT
    Hey Real Jocker's! I was just wondering, are there actually any healthy options for frozen pre-made meals in the supermarket? Like smart ones or lean cuisine? Something not only low in sodium but high in protein that can actually be eaten as a healthy alternative to lunch?

    I wouldn't want to eat them every single day but on the days that I rush out in the morning and don't have time to make a lunch, it would be easier and cheaper than buying the garbage by my office lol

    Hope you all have an awesome day! And thanks in advance for responding icon_smile.gif
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3529

    May 14, 2013 2:26 AM GMT
    make your lunch before you go to bed.

    i freeze meat in sandwich sized portions, and make up the bun in another bag and make the sandwich at work.
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    May 14, 2013 2:33 AM GMT
    I agree with Apparition, you're probably better off making your meals beforehand. Most of the frozen meals I've seen that are high in protein also have disproportionately higher unhealthy calories. If you're set on a frozen meals, WebMD lists 20 meals with their nutritional info in this article. A lot of their selections come from Kashi, Lean Cuisine, and Healthy Choice.
  • HPgeek934

    Posts: 970

    May 14, 2013 2:51 AM GMT
    thanks dahas, thats more of what I was looking for. I understand its better to make my own, but like I said in the post, sometimes I dont have time.
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    May 14, 2013 3:07 AM GMT
    Almost all of the "healthy" frozen meals still have a LOT of sodium and preservatives. So it's kind of a pain to find the ones that aren't too bad. I like Healthy Choice Grilled Chicken and Pesto. It tastes good. And the zucchini helps keep your stomach feeling full. These usually go for around $3 at most major supermarkets. Sometimes they go on sale if you have one of those loyalty cards.

    Recently, I've tried Evol frozen burritos. They're $2 each at Fresh N Easy. I haven't seen them sold anywhere else. The things I like about these are they taste decent, and the ingredients don't have a lot of strange chemicals and fillers.
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    May 14, 2013 4:06 AM GMT
    nope, none.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    May 14, 2013 4:23 AM GMT
    I've always made enough food for dinner that I can take left overs to work, for lunch.
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    May 14, 2013 11:19 AM GMT
    Just be grateful your not in the UK turns out some of are "beef" frozen ready meals have been horse meat all along!!.

    brings new meaning to the phrase am so hungry i could eat a horse. lol
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    May 14, 2013 12:11 PM GMT
    Not for me.
  • daveindenver

    Posts: 314

    May 14, 2013 1:06 PM GMT
    Sure ……I eat microwave lunches a lot. All the flavors means I don't get bored and the nutritional content is on it so you know exactly what you're getting (compared to whatever leftovers you brought from home the night before ) so they are a viable alternative. All you have to do is read the label first and be smart about it. Easy. I'll fig up some articles and post the links. You CAN eat sorta healthy at SOME fast done places! You have to be a lot more picky Tim and keep the portions small. There was a popular book called

    Eat This, Not That …try to find it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2013 1:07 PM GMT
    The next time you want to eat a frozen meal just think to yourself ' but what would Gwyneth Paltrow say ??!!'

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTc7s_9yCtj0ati_WuIynM

    Don't be fooled by her bright white smile, that is the face of judgement my friend. Remember it well the next time you dare to eat anything that isn't organic/bought from your local pretentious health food store.

    Now go and buy some duck eggs and raw honey and forget this silly idea about healthy frozen meals (that's an oxymoron right ?) icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2013 1:28 PM GMT
    Every time I eat one of those frozen meals it's because i'm feeling lazy and don't want to make a real meal....and they are ALWAYS a salt bomb. I think if you buy those bags of frozen vegetables they are good but stay away from the 'lean cuisine' type ones. They add so much sodium to make them taste 'good'
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2013 2:03 PM GMT
    HPgeek934 saidHey Real Jocker's! I was just wondering, are there actually any healthy options for frozen pre-made meals in the supermarket?
    Yes...if you consider frozen veggies as a meal.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2013 2:27 PM GMT
    If I don't have anything to eat and need something quick, I go for tuna in Olive oil.
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    May 14, 2013 3:50 PM GMT
    You can try freezing meals beforehand and take them to work. I generally don't like meals already frozen since it "destructures" the food.

    When I'm in a hurry, I generally take some salmon/tuna cans, salad, flaxbread/savoury pancakes made beforehand, fruit, etc. All cold food, but surprisingly gives me a lot of energy and doesn't make me as tired after eating.

    Hope that helps icon_biggrin.gif
  • gwuinsf

    Posts: 525

    May 14, 2013 3:53 PM GMT
    Webster666 saidI've always made enough food for dinner that I can take left overs to work, for lunch.


    I do this as well. It's too difficult to control your diet if you don't make it yourself. You have to prioritize.

    That being said, I get that sometimes you just can't make it happen and you're stuck with no healthy alternatives. Frankly, I'd still try and get a pre-made salad from Trader Joe's over a frozen meal. But if you have to get a frozen meal, I'd look for something with as few ingredients as possible and little additives.
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    May 14, 2013 4:15 PM GMT
    I developed high blood pressure from eating frozen food and not caring about what I eat. It's taken a year of watching the salt and exercise to bring it down.

    Take the time to prepare healthy food, or at least bring a few pieces of fresh fruit to work to get you by.

    The time you spend preparing food will be repaid to you in a longer life.

  • Destinharbor

    Posts: 4435

    May 14, 2013 4:19 PM GMT
    gwuinsf said
    Webster666 saidI've always made enough food for dinner that I can take left overs to work, for lunch.


    I do this as well. It's too difficult to control your diet if you don't make it yourself. You have to prioritize.

    That being said, I get that sometimes you just can't make it happen and you're stuck with no healthy alternatives. Frankly, I'd still try and get a pre-made salad from Trader Joe's over a frozen meal. But if you have to get a frozen meal, I'd look for something with as few ingredients as possible and little additives.

    Ya, this. And not just Trader Joe's. Freshmarket and Whole Foods have a lot of in-store made chicken salads and other options that are healthy. They do cost a bit more than processed frozen food but not much and they are completely free of the bad stuff.

    BTW, I know this isn't fashionable, but I don't buy into the fear of salt thing. If you check it out, there are no studies of any size that show salt to raise blood pressure for more than an hour or two in otherwise healthy people. I know it does cause water retention but that, too, is temporary. If anyone has a link to any information to the contrary, I'd appreciate the data. My source is the New York Times of about 90 days ago.
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    May 14, 2013 4:23 PM GMT
    BTW, I know this isn't fashionable, but I don't buy into the fear of salt thing. If you check it out, there are no studies of any size that show salt to raise blood pressure for more than an hour or two in otherwise healthy people. I know it does cause water retention but that, too, is temporary. If anyone has a link to any information to the contrary, I'd appreciate the data. My source is the New York Times of about 90 days ago.

    For me it was a total lifestyle thing. Just evidenced by choosing the easy way out of everything, especially food.

    The amazing thing about the human body, though, is that it "wants" to be healthy.

    I can't even have a soft drink now without getting a sugar rush.

    & btw, RJ is a HUGE motivator. The pics, the helpful attitudes. Best site. I love it.


  • gwuinsf

    Posts: 525

    May 14, 2013 4:29 PM GMT
    Agree on salt. My understanding of why salt has been demonized isn't due to salt itself, but the high sodium content of processed food. If you eat a lot of processed food as in the Standard American Diet, you are consuming too much sodium. But if you are cooking at home using whole foods and not adding salt to your meals, you probably are not getting enough.
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    May 14, 2013 4:30 PM GMT
    Most of the food you will want to eat is located in the perimeter of the store, except for grains and legumes. The stuff in the middle is mostly junk, i.e., chips, soda, sugar, frozen food, etc.

    Buy some tupperware and make a weeks worth of meals (or more) and freeze ahead of time.
  • iHavok

    Posts: 1477

    May 14, 2013 4:34 PM GMT
    kashi meals look like they average 380mg sodium each day.... and ive tried them. THey aren't horrible. Nothing you wanna invite company over and serve, but its substance...
    where are you drawing the line?

    raleys carried Evol burritos also.
    Try looking in the gluten free freezer section...
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    May 14, 2013 4:50 PM GMT
    turbobilly saidMost of the food you will want to eat is located in the perimeter of the store, except for grains and legumes. The stuff in the middle is mostly junk, i.e., chips, soda, sugar, frozen food, etc.

    Buy some tupperware and make a weeks worth of meals (or more) and freeze ahead of time.



    ^^^THIS

    I was running late this morning, so I grabbed the following out of the fridge already in single serving containers: chicken breast, black beans, fresh broccoli, cantaloupe, and a banana. Every Sunday I shop, then cook up a bunch of meats. I line up small containers, and stock up for the week. Works like a charm!!
  • real_diver2

    Posts: 88

    May 14, 2013 9:10 PM GMT
    Agree with most everyone here. It only takes me about 3 minutes a day to make a healthy lunch from scratch. Worth it!
  • muscsportsguy

    Posts: 133

    May 14, 2013 9:18 PM GMT
    Destinharbor said
    gwuinsf said
    Webster666 saidI've always made enough food for dinner that I can take left overs to work, for lunch.


    I do this as well. It's too difficult to control your diet if you don't make it yourself. You have to prioritize.

    That being said, I get that sometimes you just can't make it happen and you're stuck with no healthy alternatives. Frankly, I'd still try and get a pre-made salad from Trader Joe's over a frozen meal. But if you have to get a frozen meal, I'd look for something with as few ingredients as possible and little additives.

    Ya, this. And not just Trader Joe's. Freshmarket and Whole Foods have a lot of in-store made chicken salads and other options that are healthy. They do cost a bit more than processed frozen food but not much and they are completely free of the bad stuff.

    BTW, I know this isn't fashionable, but I don't buy into the fear of salt thing. If you check it out, there are no studies of any size that show salt to raise blood pressure for more than an hour or two in otherwise healthy people. I know it does cause water retention but that, too, is temporary. If anyone has a link to any information to the contrary, I'd appreciate the data. My source is the New York Times of about 90 days ago.


    Totally agree. My understanding has always been that if you're predisposed to high blood pressure you need to watch your salt intake. Otherwise, it's not something that merits a lot of attention. If you like salt, eat it.