The Lethality of Loneliness: We now know how it can ravage our body and brain

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2013 2:47 PM GMT
    http://www.newrepublic.com/article/113176/science-loneliness-how-isolation-can-kill-you#
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    May 14, 2013 4:52 PM GMT
    Not if you use your imagination! icon_biggrin.gif
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    May 14, 2013 5:26 PM GMT
    Uh oh, I'm in trouble. icon_eek.gif
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    May 14, 2013 5:37 PM GMT
    Fiyero27 saidUh oh, I'm in trouble. icon_eek.gif


    You're too cute to be lonely.icon_sad.gif
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    May 14, 2013 5:43 PM GMT
    HottJoe said
    Fiyero27 saidUh oh, I'm in trouble. icon_eek.gif


    You're too cute to be lonely.icon_sad.gif
    Aww thanks. But I am. icon_cry.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2013 6:05 PM GMT
    People are lonely because they build walls instead of bridges.
    -Joseph F. Newton
  • heyom

    Posts: 389

    May 15, 2013 12:21 AM GMT
    This is why I prefer the more community-based cultures (like Latino cultures) than the modern highly individual-based one, the ones where family and community is more involved with each other as a norm. Too much separation between people in the modern style, where families are separated and elders have to go to old folks' homes I think is unhealthy for one's (everyone's) mental/emotional state.
  • heyom

    Posts: 389

    May 15, 2013 1:10 AM GMT
    Unintended said
    heyom saidThis is why I prefer the more community-based cultures (like Latino cultures) than the modern highly individual-based one, the ones where family and community is more involved with each other as a norm. Too much separation between people in the modern style, where families are separated and elders have to go to old folks' homes I think is unhealthy for one's (everyone's) mental/emotional state.


    And the Internet is only making things worse.


    I think it depends though. The people that I know who are from community-based cultures, tend to use the internet to connect directly to that community over distances. An example being my Jamaican classmate who would attend her community and family's church service in New York over the internet every sunday. Or my classmate from India who would skype with her family on a daily basis. And these people were not in any way "isolated" from their classmates by the internet, any more so than they would have become isolated from their classmates if they had been in their home environments: they were equally sociable and interactive with their direct communities. So I think it depends on how you use it. (I'll agree that in more individualist cultures, like families where every member has their own tablet or phone begin to live completely past each other. On a similar note, I see people there constantly on their phones instead of the kids playing outside with each other.)

    What I think has happened is perhaps what I saw in documentary about how children these days are put in front of the television as babies. In community-cultures, children are permanently interacting with their mothers and communities well into their school years. So the latter are accustomed to constant human interaction and active play, while the former children become accustomed to always having a screen in front of them and always passively observing a screen. It has even been shown to REDUCE neural development to have children in front of screens at that early age (because their brains have not yet developed any social-neural networks, which are really the basis of human functioning.)

    More information on the effect of screens on children's development here:
    http://www.screensmart.ca/early_years
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    May 15, 2013 1:21 AM GMT
    Did anyone read this study all the way to the end?

    It subtly hints at the reason religion is so popular among the otherwise-lonely. icon_wink.gif
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    May 15, 2013 1:32 AM GMT
    Harry7785 saidPeople are lonely because they build walls instead of bridges.
    -Joseph F. Newton


    Well Said Harry
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    May 15, 2013 1:33 AM GMT
    Well that explains why theres so many cray-zee ppl here LOL
  • BloodFlame

    Posts: 1768

    May 15, 2013 1:42 AM GMT
    It's articles like that that make me wonder how my life is going to turn out lol
    I guess for lack of better way of saying it, I can admit I do feel lonely at times. I don't have friends and I'm the black sheep of my small family.

    But I will have to agree with Hot Joe, even if he may have been joking. One thing that kept me from going insane was my imagination. I love to draw and I feel at peace whenever I draw. Growing up, I never could make friends easily so whenever I felt lonely, I'd take out some paper and my trustee pencil and just draw. So in a way, I think art is my friend. icon_smile.gif

  • heyom

    Posts: 389

    May 15, 2013 2:36 AM GMT
    Unintended said
    heyom said
    Unintended said
    heyom saidThis is why I prefer the more community-based cultures (like Latino cultures) than the modern highly individual-based one, the ones where family and community is more involved with each other as a norm. Too much separation between people in the modern style, where families are separated and elders have to go to old folks' homes I think is unhealthy for one's (everyone's) mental/emotional state.


    And the Internet is only making things worse.


    I think it depends though. The people that I know who are from community-based cultures, tend to use the internet to connect directly to that community over distances. An example being my Jamaican classmate who would attend her community and family's church service in New York over the internet every sunday. Or my classmate from India who would skype with her family on a daily basis. And these people were not in any way "isolated" from their classmates by the internet, any more so than they would have become isolated from their classmates if they had been in their home environments: they were equally sociable and interactive with their direct communities. So I think it depends on how you use it. (I'll agree that in more individualist cultures, like families where every member has their own tablet or phone begin to live completely past each other. On a similar note, I see people there constantly on their phones instead of the kids playing outside with each other.)

    What I think has happened is perhaps what I saw in documentary about how children these days are put in front of the television as babies. In community-cultures, children are permanently interacting with their mothers and communities well into their school years. So the latter are accustomed to constant human interaction and active play, while the former children become accustomed to always having a screen in front of them and always passively observing a screen. It has even been shown to REDUCE neural development to have children in front of screens at that early age (because their brains have not yet developed any social-neural networks, which are really the basis of human functioning.)

    More information on the effect of screens on children's development here:
    http://www.screensmart.ca/early_years


    There is nothing wrong with the Internet to connect with like-minded individuals. We are all doing that right now. The real problem is when people isolate themselves with their primary means of interconnecting being the Internet. Humans did not evolve to spend their day alone in front of a computer.

    Not only is the human personal interaction lost, Internet users are sitting and not getting exercise and computer screens are highly stimulating due to being blue-spectrum light intensive. This results in insomnia and anxiety.


    Well, that's what I mean, but I mean to say it's not "the internet", but "screens" in general.
  • heyom

    Posts: 389

    May 15, 2013 2:39 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidDid anyone read this study all the way to the end?

    It subtly hints at the reason religion is so popular among the otherwise-lonely. icon_wink.gif


    I call bad judgement. Community-cultures are usually very religiously active. That means religion is not "unpopular" among the "non-lonely".
  • Thirdbeach

    Posts: 1364

    May 15, 2013 2:43 AM GMT
    We should get together and figure out a cure for loneliness.
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    May 15, 2013 2:45 AM GMT
    I didn't read the article because well it's quite long but I got the point... I'm screwed.
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    May 15, 2013 2:51 AM GMT
    37834286.jpg
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    May 15, 2013 3:07 AM GMT
    This really depends on personality.My mother is the type who dreads being alone for 2 long.I am very different.Even when I was single I was rarely lonely.As long as I had a few good friends,a pet,tv,the net and good books and mags I can deal with it.icon_smile.gif Ryan
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    May 15, 2013 3:19 AM GMT
    Always very lonely here