Insects as a source of protein

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 14, 2013 7:19 PM GMT
    I heard insects provide an excellent source of protein, and you can eat less of it compared to conventional meat like beef to obtain the same amount of protein. Anyone actually eat them on a regular basis? Which ones and how do you cook them?

  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14348

    May 14, 2013 8:19 PM GMT
    I would not want to risk cooking an insect that is stinging or venomous. No thank you.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    May 14, 2013 8:52 PM GMT
    I will gladly starve to death before I'll eat bugs, thank you very much.
  • Crepuscule

    Posts: 723

    May 14, 2013 9:53 PM GMT
    I'd eat bugs. But probably prepared in a way that it's impossible to tell it's insect meat I'm eating. So ground those maggots to a grey squishy pulp, then add lots of red food coloring, vegetables and heavy spices I'll probably manage.
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    May 14, 2013 10:44 PM GMT
    Mmm.... Tastes like...

    DISGUSTING INSECTS. lol no thank you...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2013 1:55 AM GMT
    I've tried deep fried crickets - they were pretty darn crunchy icon_biggrin.gif
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    May 15, 2013 2:33 AM GMT
    I had this cricket snack all of them and they are good

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSLn8DGo_wfA0LsgyaMSBZ
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    May 15, 2013 2:59 AM GMT
    Thanks guys.

    I think we need to get over our stereotypes and misconceptions about them. Unintended is right. No different from crawfish or shrimp. Crickets are good too. Glad BlueyedItalian and manny2 like them. icon_wink.gif

    Obviously with other animals, we have to discard the guts, shells, and wings. I think the French might have something stirring in their pots. When they are cooked right, they'll be a delicacy. I think bugs are a lot more efficient to digest and obtain nutrients from anyways.

    As an environmental factor, we need to stop spraying the fields with pesticides and maybe consider eating some as an option, like they've done with weeds like dandelion (leaves), which are really good for you.

    Bon appetit!icon_eek.gif
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    May 15, 2013 4:58 AM GMT
    The insects I've eaten:

    • Meal Worm Spring Rolls
    • Chocolate Chirp Cookies (yes, made with crickets)
    • Chocolate Covered Ants
    • Chocolate Covered Bees.
    • Snails
  • dmlove02

    Posts: 45

    May 15, 2013 5:02 AM GMT
    If we all could get over our aversion towards eating insects, we could have an incredibly sustainable, readily available, easily reproducible, high quality source of protein at our fingertips. The amount of energy (food) and time it takes for a cow to produce a kilo of protein is so much more than the energy and time that goes into a kilo of insects....not to mention space. It just makes sense, period. I have mixed fresh mealworms into stir fry and added them to pasta, but I do not eat them regularly. Yeah, it still gives me a little hesitation, but I think it is worth a shot. In the east it is a very regular thing to find at local markets. People can be pretty selective with their food choices - but like someone else mentioned, eating crustaceans is a pretty gross habit too, much more so than eating insects! Those things are the scavengers of the sea, eating decomposing carcasses and pieces of leftover food. But lord knows I won't turn down a nice shrimp platter :-)
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    May 15, 2013 5:50 AM GMT
    The protein yield of the insects is way more interesting than the one of meat. A lot of people in the world eat them.
    I tried a little grilled grasshoper once in Japan. The taste was good but the texture was was weird. I am sure if we are used to eat it since chidhood, it can me delicious.
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    May 15, 2013 5:58 AM GMT
    I wonder if you could run an organic, free range cricket farm.
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    May 15, 2013 6:23 AM GMT
    We eat insects everyday. There are tiny bugs that aren't easily seen and hide in grain foods like rice, cereal, and oats. icon_biggrin.gif

    Also, obligatory Bear Grylls clip:

    http://youtu.be/Uj9CysSSsps

    bear-grylls-eats-larvae-o.gif
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    May 15, 2013 6:33 AM GMT
    There are plenty of countries in Asia where various insects and other critters are marketed as food. When I went to Korea, I saw merchants in the market places with large buckets of what looked like dead crickets, roaches, beetles, etc that were clearly being sold as some sort of snack. I've heard that you can find similar things in South East Asian countries like Vietnam but I haven't been to South East Asia and can't say for sure.

    Isugemi saidThe protein yield of the insects is way more interesting than the one of meat. A lot of people in the world eat them.
    I tried a little grilled grasshoper once in Japan. The taste was good but the texture was was weird. I am sure if we are used to eat it since chidhood, it can me delicious.


    Where in Japan were you? I've spent a lot of time there and not once did I ever see grilled grasshoppers or any other kind of insect based food. Japan is usually the black sheep of Asia when it comes to these sort of things.
  • Krispy1985

    Posts: 24

    May 15, 2013 7:39 AM GMT
    xrichx saidWe eat insects everyday. There are tiny bugs that aren't easily seen and hide in grain foods like rice, cereal, and oats. icon_biggrin.gif

    Also, obligatory Bear Grylls clip:

    http://youtu.be/Uj9CysSSsps

    bear-grylls-eats-larvae-o.gif


    Ewwww fuck me, that will haunt my nightmares.

    I saw in the news that caterpillars have more protein than meat, take less time to reach full maturity ( days as opposed to years) and leave substantially less of a carbon footprint. It would be much cheaper to buy too, but there is no market in the uk due to "consumer disgust". I

    Maybe pan fried in garlic. I hate it when food explodes out my face.

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    May 15, 2013 9:35 AM GMT
    Cardinal724 saidThere are plenty of countries in Asia where various insects and other critters are marketed as food. When I went to Korea, I saw merchants in the market places with large buckets of what looked like dead crickets, roaches, beetles, etc that were clearly being sold as some sort of snack. I've heard that you can find similar things in South East Asian countries like Vietnam but I haven't been to South East Asia and can't say for sure.

    Isugemi saidThe protein yield of the insects is way more interesting than the one of meat. A lot of people in the world eat them.
    I tried a little grilled grasshoper once in Japan. The taste was good but the texture was was weird. I am sure if we are used to eat it since chidhood, it can me delicious.


    Where in Japan were you? I've spent a lot of time there and not once did I ever see grilled grasshoppers or any other kind of insect based food. Japan is usually the black sheep of Asia when it comes to these sort of things.


    Now they don't eat insects anymore, but there was a place (I forgot where... Tohoku maybe...) that was famous for grilled grasshoper. I tried it during a sort of matsuri in Fukuoka : in the middle of yakitori, o-den and grilled corn stands, there was a grasshoper stand. It was just for the folklore.
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    May 15, 2013 10:56 AM GMT
    I saw the news other day. I am gonna pass.
  • Rhi_Bran

    Posts: 904

    May 17, 2013 1:11 AM GMT
    Anyone who loves lobster / crab and hates the thought of eating insects is horribly inconsistent. The only difference is that there are no insects with as much meat as crustaceans - you need less muscle to move through air compared to water. You'd need a lot of them. I've eaten cicada as well as giant lubber legs (fried and grilled respectively) and they're both palatable. Not entirely unpleasant, but very, very bland without fixings. If you've eaten non-treated lobster or crab entirely plain, it's somewhat akin to that. Which is why most people consume them with butter and garlic.

    In fact I'm certain humans have tried multiple times throughout history to make a diet of them, but that's why they've never caught on: they are relatively tasteless, won't turn a decent profit if bred for food, and are extremely labor intensive to harvest enough from nature to make a meal on. Especially considering many insects have wings and burst locomotion - cattle do not icon_smile.gif
  • Rhi_Bran

    Posts: 904

    May 17, 2013 1:14 AM GMT
    Scruffypup saidThe insects I've eaten:

    • Meal Worm Spring Rolls
    • Chocolate Chirp Cookies (yes, made with crickets)
    • Chocolate Covered Ants
    • Chocolate Covered Bees.
    • Snails


    Snails are not insects silly.
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    May 17, 2013 1:20 AM GMT
    Rhi_Bran said
    Scruffypup saidThe insects I've eaten:

    • Meal Worm Spring Rolls
    • Chocolate Chirp Cookies (yes, made with crickets)
    • Chocolate Covered Ants
    • Chocolate Covered Bees.
    • Snails


    Snails are not insects silly.



    Opps. icon_redface.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 17, 2013 1:31 AM GMT
    It really is all about what you're accustomed to eating. Anything outside of what you grew up with is "weird". But I've always been pretty open to trying new foods for whatever reason. I draw the line at certain things, but it usually has to do with the way a creature is killed. For instance I refuse to eat veal or anything I know was made to suffer more than was necessary.
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    May 17, 2013 1:37 AM GMT
    Ive heard an earthworm has more protein than an egg
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    May 17, 2013 2:08 AM GMT
    they probably taste like shrimp, so not really a problem.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    May 17, 2013 2:18 AM GMT
    redbull saidIve heard an earthworm has more protein than an egg


    Earthworm omelets are good topped with spicy fire ants.
  • EJ994

    Posts: 87

    May 17, 2013 3:46 AM GMT
    I actually wouldn't mind eating insects. The hardest part would be the getting over the thought of it being squishy and nasty. I've never touched a bug with my bare hand before so that too would be something new for me.