Anybody know anything about the "Management of Technology" degree?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2013 2:11 AM GMT
    Hey all! Quick question: soon I'm going to be transferring from my community college to a University, and it will only take me about a year to receive my Bachelor's degree in "Management of Technology."

    The only problem is - I can't find much information regarding this major anywhere online. It seems like it combines business and computers (which I would like), but I'm worried that I won't be able to find a job in this field.

    Does anyone know much about it? I don't want to major in a Business field like this if I won't be able to score a job anywhere working with computers. Is this the equivalent to getting a "Business Degree?" I'm nervous that I might be majoring in something like this and never get anywhere in life. Does anyone know if this major would be a good opportunity or much of what it's about? Again, can't find much information so thought I'd ask.

    Here's a link to the degree plan by the way:
    http://www.athens.edu/academics/onlinedegreeofferings.php
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    May 15, 2013 5:45 AM GMT
    Other colleges might call it "management information systems" or "information systems" or "business information systems". It's somewhat similar to what I majored in. But this school's curriculum seems to emphasize the business side and not so much the technology side. Based on that, I think this degree is best suited for someone that is already working and is on track towards middle management. For this type of degree, you might want to look for jobs at consulting firms that do software development or systems integration.

    So question is, what were you hoping to do with this degree? Or what exactly do you want to do with computers?
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    May 15, 2013 5:53 AM GMT
    xrichx saidOther colleges might call it "management information systems" or "information systems" or "business information systems". It's somewhat similar to what I majored in. But this school's curriculum seems to emphasize the business side and not so much the technology side. Based on that, I think this degree is best suited for someone that is already working and is on track towards middle management. For this type of degree, you might want to look for jobs at consulting firms that do software development or systems integration.

    So question is, what were you hoping to do with this degree? Or what exactly do you want to do with computers?


    I actually think I would be wanting to do more IT work. Maybe setting up networks, trouble shooting, ect, ect. Do you think that would be possible with this degree? I'm also hoping the job outlook is decent for this field. After doing a bit more research it looks like I have a pretty good shot at scoring at least an entry-level job, right?
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    May 15, 2013 6:13 AM GMT
    JumpMan_Josh said
    I actually think I would be wanting to do more IT work. Maybe setting up networks, trouble shooting, ect, ect. Do you think that would be possible with this degree? I'm also hoping the job outlook is decent for this field. After doing a bit more research it looks like I have a pretty good shot at scoring at least an entry-level job, right?
    Wrong degree for that type of work. And I don't see any degrees on that list that would be applicable. This is more suitable for your interests..

    Associate in Computer Information Systems, with an option in Networking. And a CCNA certificate.

    https://www.calhoun.edu/programs_of_study/division_of_businesscis_technologies_workforce_development/computer_information_systems_programslinks/computer_information_systems.aspx

    https://www.calhoun.edu/sites/www/Uploads/files/Program/Business/CIS.pdf

    Sorry. Probably not the news you wanted to hear. I'm sure your current degree will help get your foot in the door for interviews. But like I said before, that degree appears to be targeted towards people that are already working in the industry and are looking to advance their career.
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    May 15, 2013 12:43 PM GMT
    xrichx said
    JumpMan_Josh said
    I actually think I would be wanting to do more IT work. Maybe setting up networks, trouble shooting, ect, ect. Do you think that would be possible with this degree? I'm also hoping the job outlook is decent for this field. After doing a bit more research it looks like I have a pretty good shot at scoring at least an entry-level job, right?
    Wrong degree for that type of work. And I don't see any degrees on that list that would be applicable. This is more suitable for your interests..

    Associate in Computer Information Systems, with an option in Networking. And a CCNA certificate.

    https://www.calhoun.edu/programs_of_study/division_of_businesscis_technologies_workforce_development/computer_information_systems_programslinks/computer_information_systems.aspx

    https://www.calhoun.edu/sites/www/Uploads/files/Program/Business/CIS.pdf

    Sorry. Probably not the news you wanted to hear. I'm sure your current degree will help get your foot in the door for interviews. But like I said before, that degree appears to be targeted towards people that are already working in the industry and are looking to advance their career.



    This.

    I'm currently working towards my ITIL certification, which is the standard for IT management.

    You would very rarely be working directly with technology. Your job would mostly be to make sure your team stays on task, risk assessment, budgeting, and planning and deploying IT services.
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    May 15, 2013 1:02 PM GMT
    xrichx said
    JumpMan_Josh said
    I actually think I would be wanting to do more IT work. Maybe setting up networks, trouble shooting, ect, ect. Do you think that would be possible with this degree? I'm also hoping the job outlook is decent for this field. After doing a bit more research it looks like I have a pretty good shot at scoring at least an entry-level job, right?
    Wrong degree for that type of work. And I don't see any degrees on that list that would be applicable. This is more suitable for your interests..

    Associate in Computer Information Systems, with an option in Networking. And a CCNA certificate.

    https://www.calhoun.edu/programs_of_study/division_of_businesscis_technologies_workforce_development/computer_information_systems_programslinks/computer_information_systems.aspx

    https://www.calhoun.edu/sites/www/Uploads/files/Program/Business/CIS.pdf

    Sorry. Probably not the news you wanted to hear. I'm sure your current degree will help get your foot in the door for interviews. But like I said before, that degree appears to be targeted towards people that are already working in the industry and are looking to advance their career.


    Bummer! Looks like I'm going to have to re-evaluate a lot of things. I'm starting to wonder if it would just be better to go ahead and get that degree, score a job, and maybe return back to college sometime later, or go ahead and take some classes over towards a CIS degree. Decisions, decisions. I also wondering if employers will just care if I have a degree, or if I'm needing to be more specific with it.

    (I guess what I'm saying is that I've been gearing towards this degree so long that I'm really just wanting to get it and get the heck out of college with a decent job in another state haha!)
  • Import

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    May 15, 2013 1:08 PM GMT
    xrichx saidOther colleges might call it "management information systems" or "information systems" or "business information systems". It's somewhat similar to what I majored in. But this school's curriculum seems to emphasize the business side and not so much the technology side. Based on that, I think this degree is best suited for someone that is already working and is on track towards middle management. For this type of degree, you might want to look for jobs at consulting firms that do software development or systems integration.

    So question is, what were you hoping to do with this degree? Or what exactly do you want to do with computers?


    This.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2013 6:23 PM GMT
    Judging by the degree plan, the major is really mostly about management and there doesn't seem to be anything related to programming in there.
    Of course, as it's been said already, it all depends on what you wish to learn.
    If you are already experienced with computer programming, networkking etc. this will teach you some valuable business skills to add to that. On it's own it is more of a business/marketing degree.
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    May 15, 2013 6:26 PM GMT
    AaronH20P saidJudging by the degree plan, the major is really mostly about management and there doesn't seem to be anything related to programming in there.
    Of course, as it's been said already, it all depends on what you wish to learn.
    If you are already experienced with computer programming, networkking etc. this will teach you some valuable business skills to add to that. On it's own it is more of a business/marketing degree.


    See, that's a shame because I know c++, networking, and many other things about computers, I just don't have a piece of paper saying I do. This bums me out because I feel like I'm going to have to change my degree plan now when I'm so close :-(!
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    May 15, 2013 6:30 PM GMT
    JumpMan_Josh said
    AaronH20P saidJudging by the degree plan, the major is really mostly about management and there doesn't seem to be anything related to programming in there.
    Of course, as it's been said already, it all depends on what you wish to learn.
    If you are already experienced with computer programming, networkking etc. this will teach you some valuable business skills to add to that. On it's own it is more of a business/marketing degree.


    See, that's a shame because I know c++, networking, and many other things about computers, I just don't have a piece of paper saying I do. This bums me out because I feel like I'm going to have to change my degree plan now when I'm so close :-(!


    If you have experience in those, you could focus on getting certifications from cisco, oracle, windows etc. Certifications + work experience + the business degree will make a good combination.
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    May 15, 2013 6:32 PM GMT
    AaronH20P said
    JumpMan_Josh said
    AaronH20P saidJudging by the degree plan, the major is really mostly about management and there doesn't seem to be anything related to programming in there.
    Of course, as it's been said already, it all depends on what you wish to learn.
    If you are already experienced with computer programming, networkking etc. this will teach you some valuable business skills to add to that. On it's own it is more of a business/marketing degree.


    See, that's a shame because I know c++, networking, and many other things about computers, I just don't have a piece of paper saying I do. This bums me out because I feel like I'm going to have to change my degree plan now when I'm so close :-(!


    If you have experience in those, you could focus on getting certifications from cisco, oracle, windows etc. Certifications + work experience + the business degree will make a good combination.


    Thanks! Do you have a link to some of these certifications and all about them? My college instructors have really left me in the dark about all of these things...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2013 6:33 PM GMT
    Sounds like a MIS degree to me.

    Josh, take a look at wgu.edu

    www.wgu.edu

    It's Western Governor's University. Is fully accredited, is very good pricing, and INCLUDES just about every certification you can imagine.

    As a senior level IT guy, I can tell you all the big demand is in JAVA development right now. Ancillary to that is analysts, project management, and testing, along with virtualization deployments.

    Probably the hottest job in IT right now is JAVA Software Architect, aside from JAVA programmers.

    Companies are bringing over tons of H1s to fill these jobs, so learn to try to decipher accents.
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    May 15, 2013 6:37 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidSounds like a MIS degree to me.


    My professor emailed me and said it is closely related to that, but for people who want to "manage technology and people over technology."

    I just want to fix stuff, make money, and get the heck out of Alabama hehe!
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    May 15, 2013 6:39 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidSounds like a MIS degree to me.

    Josh, take a look at wgu.edu

    www.wgu.edu

    It's Western Governor's University. Is fully accredited, is very good pricing, and INCLUDES just about every certification you can imagine.

    As a senior level IT guy, I can tell you all the big demand is in JAVA development right now. Ancillary to that is analysts, project management, and testing, along with virtualization deployments.

    Probably the hottest job in IT right now is JAVA Software Architect, aside from JAVA programmers.

    Companies are bringing over tons of H1s to fill these jobs, so learn to try to decipher accents.


    Thanks for all of that chucky! Ill check it out when I get home from work and get off this stupid iPhone! I have some more questions I may swing by you if that's okay too!
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    May 15, 2013 6:40 PM GMT
    JumpMan_Josh said
    Thanks! Do you have a link to some of these certifications and all about them? My college instructors have really left me in the dark about all of these things...


    check these sites:

    education.oracle.com (they also do Java certification after they bought Sun Microsystems)
    cisco.com/web/learning/certifications
    www.microsoft.com/learning/


    It's a shame C++ doesn't have an official certification since it's such a widely used language
  • Pontifex

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    May 15, 2013 7:05 PM GMT
    I wouldn't necessarily worry as much about the name of the degree you get as you think you have to. I'm involved in hiring for my IT group at work. I've hired everything from guys with psych degrees to engineers. To me if you have skills and are capable of solving problems I will take that over someone who through talking to in an interview is only capable of quoting from books.

    The only similar courses I can think of around here are the business faculty which has a management information systems major and the community college which has an information technology management set of courses intended for someone with a technical background who is moving into management(I'm actually looking into taking this right now)

    My boss has a psych degree so it is possible to get somewhere in a different field than your degree. Most of the guys I know who set up servers, run wire , and configure switches have had an interest in it for years. They could have probably done the job just out of high school but ended up getting a degree because nobody would look at them otherwise.
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    May 15, 2013 7:43 PM GMT
    JumpMan_Josh said
    xrichx said
    JumpMan_Josh said
    I actually think I would be wanting to do more IT work. Maybe setting up networks, trouble shooting, ect, ect. Do you think that would be possible with this degree? I'm also hoping the job outlook is decent for this field. After doing a bit more research it looks like I have a pretty good shot at scoring at least an entry-level job, right?
    Wrong degree for that type of work. And I don't see any degrees on that list that would be applicable. This is more suitable for your interests..

    Associate in Computer Information Systems, with an option in Networking. And a CCNA certificate.

    https://www.calhoun.edu/programs_of_study/division_of_businesscis_technologies_workforce_development/computer_information_systems_programslinks/computer_information_systems.aspx

    https://www.calhoun.edu/sites/www/Uploads/files/Program/Business/CIS.pdf

    Sorry. Probably not the news you wanted to hear. I'm sure your current degree will help get your foot in the door for interviews. But like I said before, that degree appears to be targeted towards people that are already working in the industry and are looking to advance their career.


    Bummer! Looks like I'm going to have to re-evaluate a lot of things. I'm starting to wonder if it would just be better to go ahead and get that degree, score a job, and maybe return back to college sometime later, or go ahead and take some classes over towards a CIS degree. Decisions, decisions. I also wondering if employers will just care if I have a degree, or if I'm needing to be more specific with it.

    (I guess what I'm saying is that I've been gearing towards this degree so long that I'm really just wanting to get it and get the heck out of college with a decent job in another state haha!)
    I think you should go ahead and complete your degree if you're almost done. It's better than not having one. Then go out and see how the job market is. Like I said, it should at least get your foot in the door for interviews. And who knows.. maybe during the interview process you might not qualify for one job but they might tell you about another job that best fits your interests.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2013 8:17 PM GMT
    http://www.wgu.edu/online_it_degrees/programs
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 15, 2013 8:26 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidhttp://www.wgu.edu/online_it_degrees/programs


    Very interesting school.

    http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/magazine/septemberoctober_2011/features/the_college_forprofits_should031640.php?page=1

    Times have really changed since the Pleistocene era when I went to college.
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    May 15, 2013 10:33 PM GMT
    Management of Technology is a myth. It is an illusion. We cannot manage technology. Technology will beget more technology until it can create itself without human intervention. This is already happening at Intel where computers design other computers. Soon, nanorobotics will be able to assemble themselves and create other, more advanced nanorobots.

    We are doomed to extinction by our own creation. It is true. I know.

    I've watched all seasons of Battlestar Galactica from 2004-2009. And, "Caprica".

    Choose another degree which computers cannot yet automate, such as philosophy or political science. But remember, all of this has happened before and it will all happen again.

    BTW, my degree is in Hospitality Management. I don't work in the industry anymore. I found it to be inhospitable at a certain point.
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    May 16, 2013 3:21 AM GMT
    GAMRican saidManagement of Technology is a myth. It is an illusion. We cannot manage technology. Technology will beget more technology until it can create itself without human intervention. This is already happening at Intel where computers design other computers. Soon, nanorobotics will be able to assemble themselves and create other, more advanced nanorobots.

    We are doomed to extinction by our own creation. It is true. I know.

    I've watched all seasons of Battlestar Galactica from 2004-2009. And, "Caprica".

    Choose another degree which computers cannot yet automate, such as philosophy or political science. But remember, all of this has happened before and it will all happen again.

    BTW, my degree is in Hospitality Management. I don't work in the industry anymore. I found it to be inhospitable at a certain point.


    I watched all of the Battlestar series...too.

    AI is definitely here. AI, along with synthetic biology, will, no doubt, completely change the evolutionary track of man from where it is now, and will continue to disclose that false belief systems (religion / cults / etc.) are false.
  • LJay

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    May 16, 2013 3:45 AM GMT
    Consider getting the bachelor's degree in a year and then either going for a master's in the computer field, or another bachelor's using some of your credits already earned, or something like the associate's degree xrichx is talking about. A friend of mine stacked up degrees like this to great success.
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    Jul 20, 2013 11:00 PM GMT
    JumpMan_Josh saidHey all! Quick question: soon I'm going to be transferring from my community college to a University, and it will only take me about a year to receive my Bachelor's degree in "Management of Technology."

    The only problem is - I can't find much information regarding this major anywhere online. It seems like it combines business and computers (which I would like), but I'm worried that I won't be able to find a job in this field.

    Does anyone know much about it? I don't want to major in a Business field like this if I won't be able to score a job anywhere working with computers. Is this the equivalent to getting a "Business Degree?" I'm nervous that I might be majoring in something like this and never get anywhere in life. Does anyone know if this major would be a good opportunity or much of what it's about? Again, can't find much information so thought I'd ask.

    Here's a link to the degree plan by the way:
    http://www.athens.edu/academics/onlinedegreeofferings.php


    Hey man! Sup?!

    Take a look at this (same school as you mention):
    http://www.athens.edu/college_arts/computer_science/

    The most important degree you can take is the one that will expose you to the most difficult problem solving. Anyone can learn a technology and use it; few people can actually think icon_biggrin.gif

    I would still encourage anyone to take a brick and mortar education over an online one. You don't really attend school for the classes as much as you do to be around other smart people. This becomes even more apparent if you do graduate school. Essentially, the environment will drive you to be a better engineer, expose you to more problems, and cultivate ideas.

    Look for a degree program that excites you and doesn't focus on technology specifics. Technology (for example Java) should only be a vehicle to learn the broader principles -- not a means to an end. Once you program in 15+ languages and multiple paradigms (functional, OO, AOP etc ...), you will see that computer languages (currently ... and possibly even in the quantum realm) differ mostly by syntax and semantics.

    In all the places I've worked, all the managers have been engineers/scientists. The last company I was in (huge one ... you're probably using their product right now to read this ;) ) the CEO was an engineer! Who do you think starts companies that succeed in silicon valley?

    Bottom line ... you want to work in technology (why wouldn't you?!) then study it! You already know if you love it. Follow that and you can't be wrong.

    Good Luck!

  • TheBizMan

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    Jul 20, 2013 11:02 PM GMT
    That degree is one of the best you can obtain in this modern business age. I only wish I had concentrated in management of information systems.
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    Jul 20, 2013 11:32 PM GMT
    GAMRican saidManagement of Technology is a myth. It is an illusion. We cannot manage technology. Technology will beget more technology until it can create itself without human intervention. This is already happening at Intel where computers design other computers. Soon, nanorobotics will be able to assemble themselves and create other, more advanced nanorobots.


    Indirectly, with your statement about technology creating technology, you're referencing the exponential growth of technology (you can actually write the formula from what you wrote)... the so called singularity. Most legitimate scientists are very skeptical about this scenario. I won't go into the AI thing icon_biggrin.gif Let's just say it's a very (very) hard problem.