Transfusions Reverse Aging Effects On Hearts In Mice

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    May 21, 2013 2:48 AM GMT

    Research published yesterday in the journal Cell (abstract) by Richard Lee and Amy Wagers of Harvard has isolated GDF-11 as a negative regulator of age-associated cardiac hypertrophy. 'When the protein ... was injected into old mice, which develop thickened heart walls in a manner similar to aging humans, the hearts were reduced in size and thickness, resembling the healthy hearts of younger mice.' Through a type of transfusion called parabiotic or 'shared circulation' in mice — one old and sick, the other young and well — they managed to reverse this age-associated heart disease. From there, they isolated an active agent, GDF-11, present in the younger mouse but absent in the older, which reverses the condition when administered directly. They are also using the agent to restore other aged/diseased tissues and organs. Human applications are expected within six years. Since the basis for the treatment is ordinary sharing of blood between an older ill, and younger healthy patient, we can probably expect someone to start offering the transfusion treatment somewhere in the world, soon, to those with the means to find a young and healthy volunteer.
  • monstapex

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    May 21, 2013 10:44 AM GMT

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    Jun 04, 2013 11:22 AM GMT

    Researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have identified a blood protein they say can reverse the aging process in mouse hearts. After introducing the protein into the hearts of old mice, the scientists say they saw the organs 'grow younger' before their eyes, results that could eventually help in the treatment of human heart disease. Ben Gruber has more.
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    Jun 04, 2013 2:23 PM GMT
    Madame Mao got transfusions from young healthy soldiers back in the 1960s. Mao was livid when he found out.