should I ever reduce protein intake?

  • cdnclub

    Posts: 79

    Sep 07, 2007 2:34 PM GMT
    Hi guys!..Relatively new member here and this is my first post. Hopefully someone might know the answer to my question as I have never seen it addressed before. I know that your protein intake should be 0.8 grm to 1 grm per pound of body weight. But if you did a bulk and went up to say, 200pounds, and were taking 200 grms of protein a day, and then you do a cut, do you reduce your protein intake to reflect your new body weight, or keep it the same as you highest weight in order to hold onto the muscle you may have gained? Hoping someone out there has the answer!
    thanks Dave :)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 07, 2007 4:20 PM GMT
    It's a 1.5g per lb. of body wieght, so if your 200lbs. you should be consuming 300g per day. And if your cutting you should keep your protien intake even higher so your keeping mostly muscle.
  • cdnclub

    Posts: 79

    Sep 07, 2007 4:35 PM GMT
    Thanks Mikey! Obviously you know what you’re doing :)….will follow your advice!
  • cdnclub

    Posts: 79

    Sep 08, 2007 5:28 PM GMT
    Thank you Psych!...I will follow your advice :)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 08, 2007 5:48 PM GMT
    There is no proof that more protein consumed passed recommended allowances for body size to either build or maintain current muscle mass. Your best advice is to ask a nutritionist.
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    Sep 08, 2007 10:14 PM GMT
    But what is the minimum (or ideal) protein intake to build muscle? I've always heard the same rule MickeyGunz mentioned -- 1.5 (or 2) grams per lb. -- but I've also always thought that was excessive. At least my digestive system finds it excessive.
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    Sep 08, 2007 10:35 PM GMT
    That should be 1.5 or 2 gm per kg. There is a strange custom in U.S. journalism to simply change SI units to imperial unit names, without doing the actual conversion. Kind of the same bizarre way we say "calories" when we are really talking about kilocalories. It makes for some very weird news stories.

    The strangest that I've seen was a preposterous story on the AP wire this spring, about a wave of extreme cold weather in Bavaria. Finally, I looked at the weather chart, and realized that some moron was reporting celcius temperatures as farenheit.

    There is a very disturbing trend that I've noticed among both state and federal regulatory officials and nursing students in my classes. When reading anything, they simply skip over any numbers, as if they weren't even there. When I put math problems on a test (and I make them very easy - powers of ten or factors of two) more than half of the class simply skips them. They don't even read them, much less attempt to answer them. If I become hospitalized, I'm checking my own dosages.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 08, 2007 10:47 PM GMT
    Well, there's a huge difference between 1.5 or 2 grams/kilo and 4.5/kilo, which Psych is saying you can ingest. Where do you come up with the 1.5 or 2?
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    Sep 08, 2007 10:53 PM GMT
    well good Pysch

    cause my source of information is an RD from the ADA.

    :)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 08, 2007 11:03 PM GMT
    Well, I am not doing any de novo calculation here - just filtering through the many claims in print. The 1.5 to 2 gm/lb widely seen on web pages appears to have orginated as a mistranslation of 2 g/kg, which is right in the middle of the range that P.E.S. mentions. After all, who in their right mind would make a recommendation in a strange mixed unit like gm/lb?
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    Sep 08, 2007 11:04 PM GMT
    I don't even understand what this means, Slayer: "There is no proof that more protein consumed passed recommended allowances for body size to either build or maintain current muscle mass."
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 08, 2007 11:20 PM GMT
    Here are some random studies that I could find in one minute, although a couple of them are almost pre-Ahnold:

    Cribb PJ, Williams AD, Carey MF, Hayes A.
    The effect of whey isolate and resistance training on strength, body composition, and plasma glutamine.
    Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2006 Oct;16(5):494-509.


    Smith NJ.
    Gaining and losing weight in athletics.
    JAMA. 1976 Jul 12;236(2):149-51.


    Laricheva KA, Ialovaia NI, Shubin VI, Smirnov PV, Beliaev VS.
    Use of the specialized protein product, SP-11, in the nutrition of highly trained sportsmen in heavy athletics]
    Vopr Pitan. 1977 Jul-Aug;(4):47-51.

    Malomsoki EJ, Ekes E, Martos E.
    The effect of completed nutrition on the athletes' performance.
    J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 1991 Sep;31(3):420-4.
  • cdnclub

    Posts: 79

    Sep 11, 2007 5:10 PM GMT
    Wow…looks like there is a bit of confusion out there about protein intake. Thanks everyone for responding to my inquiry. I am hoping that it’s true about the 1grm/1kgrm ratio because that means I can really cut back on my protein intake. I’ve always felt that I may be taking too much, and my body has definitely let me know that it doesn’t like it..lol.
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    Sep 12, 2007 11:36 AM GMT
    Hooofuckingray!

    Well done Psych on putting the correct figures up! I get totally pissed at the bastardisation of the true figures by just switching the unit of measurement and not the figure!

    Now if you want a laugh go compare those figures to what it reccomends on majority of US based protein powders and it shows how much of a rip off they are suggesting one major brand is 3.25 times the reccomended amount.

  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Sep 13, 2007 4:47 PM GMT
    Dave,

    your protein intake also depends on how much you work out and your intensity. Tell us more about that, and you will get advice specific to you not just genralities!!

    Mike
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    Sep 15, 2007 4:14 AM GMT
    Hi. I'm new in this website, I joined this website because I want to get some advises from the experts people and members that are in this site.

    I'm 40 years old, 150 pounds, I have a cholesterol problem. it is a litle high, so i have problems eating anything, but at the same time I want to build my body. I'm too slim and I have some belly.

    I know that I can't eat thing or foods that raise more my cholesterol. Does anybody has an advise for me of what can I do/ Or what diet can I follow and at the same time workout my body?

    Please let know what is your point of view please.

    thank you
  • cdnclub

    Posts: 79

    Sep 17, 2007 2:49 PM GMT
    Hey Mike,

    I am in the process of bulking right now...very slowly at about a pound a week till the end of Dec. I just wasn't sure if there was a general rule on protein intake regardless of your activity, or if there ever should be an increase or decrease in intake. My thinking is that as I gain weight, my protein intake would increase proportionate to that weight gain. Then what happens when in January, when I go into the cutting phase, do I reduce my protein intake according to my decreasing body weight? I was thinking that it should stay the same as at my heaviest weight so that I hold onto any muscle I may have gained. From the responses I have been getting it seems that I would decrease my intake as my weight goes down.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Sep 19, 2007 6:52 AM GMT
    I agree it should go down as you cut wait but cut back gradually or you will lose the muscle mass you have worked hard to attain. It sounds like you hit the gym regularly and I have been told the 1 to 1.5 gram of protein per pound of body weight is the way to go. Just remember everyone is an individual and their intake needs will also be different as well.

    Mike3
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    Sep 19, 2007 9:35 AM GMT
    argggg there we go again ! its per kg not lb!
  • Artesin

    Posts: 482

    Dec 14, 2007 3:43 AM GMT
    CUrse you all and your metric system blasphemy !! Anyone willing to post some simple hypothetical guidelines of what to follow from 150-200 lbs if the gym is hit regularaly?
  • justinlee86

    Posts: 501

    Dec 14, 2007 8:27 AM GMT
    first off you cannot compare grams of protein to pounds...you have to convert your body weight into kg.

    Your body weight in pounds divided by about 2.2 should give you an approximate of your weight in kg.

    then depending on the recommended amount of protein which for resistance training should be at about 1.5g to 2 g.

    so for a 200 lbs. man it should look something like this.

    200 / 2.2 = 90.91

    90.91 x 1.5 = 109.092 g.

    so you should have a daily intake of aout 109g of protein.
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    Dec 14, 2007 5:06 PM GMT
    Justin,

    Thanks for the conversion, however I don't think your numbers add up...seems like it should be 136.3g a day.

    Also, what is the recommended types of food to get that protein? Rather do natural food than protein shake type drinks.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Dec 14, 2007 5:10 PM GMT
    If you have prostate cancer in your family, too much protein can increase your chances.
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    Dec 14, 2007 5:14 PM GMT
    So is 1- 1.5 placing you into a higher risk group mnjock or is that the normal amount that would be required for the body? Have a dad who has prostate cancer here.
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    Dec 14, 2007 5:30 PM GMT
    I was advised to take soy protein and soy milk to help reduce my risk and that studies had shown people who had excessive protein from Milk, dairy and animal products had increased rates of cancer. Again, the key word being excessive. Too much soy isn't great either. I am just going on advice from my urologist. Every man in my family has prostate cancer. Every case is different I suppose.