BOOKS by FEMALE Writers

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 23, 2013 5:35 PM GMT
    I know this sounds stupid, but I am not a fan of reading some (not all) novels by female writers, especially if they are about male protagonists. Of course I loved Agatha Christie books when I was a kid, etc, but it just seems that there is a disproportionate number of books written by women. I like to read about men from a man's point of view.

    Is anyone else like that?
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    May 23, 2013 5:44 PM GMT
    So read books written by men...icon_confused.gif

    You're being narrow minded though. Thank god the younger generation grew up with J.K. Rowling.icon_wink.gif
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    May 23, 2013 5:46 PM GMT
    I tend to not like female writers unless they are extremely educated. I've had trouble getting through a lot of books lately men and women. I tend to like Male writers of course. Funny one of my favorite books was "My life as a geisha" written by a white dude.
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    May 23, 2013 5:49 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidSo read books written by men...icon_confused.gif

    You're being narrow minded though. Thank god the younger generation grew up with J.K. Rowling.icon_wink.gif


    And it's funny how she used initials to appear to be a man, or just ambiguous.
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    May 23, 2013 6:03 PM GMT
    You know what I'm really tired of seeing? Books about NYC or Connecticut upper-class. Books about people who attended "boarding school" or vacation at "Martha's Vineyard." The reason why there are so many books like this: publishers mingling with writers who live in those cities. That's also why you see so many crime dramas and shows on TV set in Los Angeles or New York.

  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    May 23, 2013 6:10 PM GMT
    wrestlervic said
    HottJoe saidSo read books written by men...icon_confused.gif

    You're being narrow minded though. Thank god the younger generation grew up with J.K. Rowling.icon_wink.gif


    And it's funny how she used initials to appear to be a man, or just ambiguous.


    She may have felt she had to. The idea that the next C.S. Lewis would be a woman seemed radical at the time. We take her for granted now, because she's the most commercially successful author in history.

    Female novelists have been more successful than women composers, playwrights, fashion designers, etc., and that's because you can write alone in a room. Some of the most important works were written by women.

    Btw, as an aspiring novelist, your best bet is to keep your disdain for female writers to yourself. Most readers, agents, and editors are women. It's a smaller world than you realize, and you will be blacklisted.
  • HottJoe

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    May 23, 2013 6:12 PM GMT
    wrestlervic saidYou know what I'm really tired of seeing? Books about NYC or Connecticut upper-class. Books about people who attended "boarding school" or vacation at "Martha's Vineyard." The reason why there are so many books like this: publishers mingling with writers who live in those cities. That's also why you see so many crime dramas and shows on TV set in Los Angeles or New York.



    Now that I can agree with! Lol
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    May 23, 2013 6:19 PM GMT
    I self-publish. I'll be damn if I'll wait for some publisher to put me at the top of their "slush pile." Did you know that's what they call it?

    I have no disdain for female writers. I just like fiction about central male characters to be written by men. Non-fiction, I have no preference.
  • HottJoe

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    May 23, 2013 6:29 PM GMT
    wrestlervic saidI self-publish. I'll be damn if I'll wait for some publisher to put me at the top of their "slush pile." Did you know that's what they call it?

    I have no disdain for female writers. I just like fiction about central male characters to be written by men. Non-fiction, I have no preference.


    Even as a self-published writer you should be aware that the majority of readers interested in fiction are women. Most men seem to prefer video games. At least, that's what I've noticed. I'm actually in a fringe category, because I write gay fiction, which has a very small audience.... You have to write for yourself though and just hope that people want to go with you on the ride.

    Edit: btw, how has self-publishing worked out for you? It seems to be the wave of the future.
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    May 23, 2013 7:12 PM GMT
    HottJoe said
    wrestlervic saidI self-publish. I'll be damn if I'll wait for some publisher to put me at the top of their "slush pile." Did you know that's what they call it?

    I have no disdain for female writers. I just like fiction about central male characters to be written by men. Non-fiction, I have no preference.


    Even as a self-published writer you should be aware that the majority of readers interested in fiction are women. Most men seem to prefer video games. At least, that's what I've noticed. I'm actually in a fringe category, because I write gay fiction, which has a very small audience.... You have to write for yourself though and just hope that people want to go with you on the ride.

    Edit: btw, how has self-publishing worked out for you? It seems to be the wave of the future.


    It's very rewarding to have strangers like your book. I see it this way, it is almost impossible with the number of writers out there to get your book published by a major publisher. With Borders closing, and probably Barnes and Noble next, there may not be many brick-and-mortar book stores five years from now. Because of that, publishers are only taking their chances on books by big names.

    You're right that you have to write for yourself. You have to create a niche of people who admire your work, through Facebook, etc. That's how you gain a following. You may only sell twenty books a month, or maybe you'll sell over 200, but you are in control. And if that audience makes your book go viral, publishers may contact you. They are actually looking now for books that have already "made the grade." I just feel that what anyone writes is important. For someone to spend years of their life to write something that may never be read is just tragic to me. Just think of all the wonderful masterpieces lost because some unhappy agent didn't like the topic.

    By the way, the main character in my current book is named Joe. He has big calves, as all main characters should. icon_wink.gif
  • HottJoe

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    May 23, 2013 8:23 PM GMT
    Hmm, is Joe gay? lol
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    May 23, 2013 8:26 PM GMT
    HottJoe said
    wrestlervic saidI self-publish. I'll be damn if I'll wait for some publisher to put me at the top of their "slush pile." Did you know that's what they call it?

    I have no disdain for female writers. I just like fiction about central male characters to be written by men. Non-fiction, I have no preference.


    Even as a self-published writer you should be aware that the majority of readers interested in fiction are women. Most men seem to prefer video games. At least, that's what I've noticed. I'm actually in a fringe category, because I write gay fiction, which has a very small audience.... You have to write for yourself though and just hope that people want to go with you on the ride.

    Edit: btw, how has self-publishing worked out for you? It seems to be the wave of the future.


    I'm curious, since you mentioned gay fiction: have you read any of/what do you think of David Levithan's works?

    As to the OP, read some Margaret Atwood. She'll blow your mind.
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    May 23, 2013 8:31 PM GMT
    HottJoe saidHmm, is Joe gay? lol


    You know, I don't really talk about his preference, other than this one sentence: "A few short-lived relationships with unimaginative women made him skeptical of venturing further."

    I've written erotic wrestling stories before, but for this book it's not important.
  • Fable

    Posts: 3866

    May 23, 2013 8:38 PM GMT
    wrestlervic saidI know this sounds stupid, but I am not a fan of reading some (not all) novels by female writers, especially if they are about male protagonists.
    Is anyone else like that?


    no


  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    May 23, 2013 8:52 PM GMT
    silent_weapon said
    HottJoe said
    wrestlervic saidI self-publish. I'll be damn if I'll wait for some publisher to put me at the top of their "slush pile." Did you know that's what they call it?

    I have no disdain for female writers. I just like fiction about central male characters to be written by men. Non-fiction, I have no preference.


    Even as a self-published writer you should be aware that the majority of readers interested in fiction are women. Most men seem to prefer video games. At least, that's what I've noticed. I'm actually in a fringe category, because I write gay fiction, which has a very small audience.... You have to write for yourself though and just hope that people want to go with you on the ride.

    Edit: btw, how has self-publishing worked out for you? It seems to be the wave of the future.


    I'm curious, since you mentioned gay fiction: have you read any of/what do you think of David Levithan's works?

    As to the OP, read some Margaret Atwood. She'll blow your mind.


    I'm very familiar with him. I wrote a YA novel called The Boys and the Bees, which is in the same genre.

    Edit: there is another book with the same title that comes up first on Amazon. Mine is the one with the pink cover.
  • HottJoe

    Posts: 21366

    May 23, 2013 8:56 PM GMT
    wrestlervic said
    HottJoe saidHmm, is Joe gay? lol


    You know, I don't really talk about his preference, other than this one sentence: "A few short-lived relationships with unimaginative women made him skeptical of venturing further."

    I've written erotic wrestling stories before, but for this book it's not important.


    My characters are as obsessed with sex as I am.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 23, 2013 9:05 PM GMT
    I read books regardless of what the gender of the author is. Books, have words, and letters, not a vagina, or a penis, so why should it matter?
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    May 23, 2013 9:32 PM GMT
    wrestlervic saidThat's also why you see so many crime dramas and shows on TV set in Los Angeles or New York.

    Except for Cabot Cove, Maine, the murder capital of the US. If I lived in that fictional town I would have Jessica Fletcher burned as a witch, for bringing so much death upon us.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    May 23, 2013 10:35 PM GMT
    I am more drawn to male authors.
    But, there are some wonderful exceptions:

    "The Time Traveler's Wife," by Audrey Niffenegger is a great book.
    I like anything written by Laura Moriarty.
    And, of course, I loved the J.K. Rowling series of Harry Potter books.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 23, 2013 10:43 PM GMT
    Hmmm
    Just glanced to my book shelf's and other than Janet Evanovich--I'm quite sexists.
  • AMoonHawk

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    May 24, 2013 2:30 AM GMT
    Love Ann Rice
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 24, 2013 3:14 AM GMT
    Most of the books I read tend to be by male authors but that's mostly because I read a lot of fantasy and sci-fi, which are heavily male dominated. There are a few female fantasy authors that I would like to check out though. (Besides Rowling of course - I love the Harry Potter books)
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    May 24, 2013 3:16 AM GMT
    AMoonHawk saidLove Ann Rice


    I love a lot of her books!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 24, 2013 6:12 AM GMT
    Seriously.
    Women can't write.

    Characters like Atticus Finch, Dr. Victor Frankenstein, Heathcliff, or Macon "Milkman" Dead III have no place in literature.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    May 24, 2013 6:55 AM GMT
    Macaque saidSeriously.
    Women can't write.

    Characters like Atticus Finch, Dr. Victor Frankenstein, Heathcliff, or Macon "Milkman" Dead III have no place in literature.



    I will go to my urn believing that Truman Capote wrote "To Kill a Mockingbird."