The Obamacare Nightmare Scenario

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    May 24, 2013 6:28 PM GMT
    http://reason.com/blog/2013/05/22/the-obamacare-nightmare-scenario
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    May 24, 2013 9:46 PM GMT
    14Jihad88Fem saidTL;DR
    The jealously for Obama isreal.


    Heh. If only that were actually the case. There are some extremists who think that it's Republicans who want it to fail when they don't bother acknowledging how bad the bill was written. As it notes, the open question though is whether or not the exchanges will succeed... and there already appears to be some indications that it won't.
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    May 24, 2013 9:52 PM GMT
    AND EVEN MORE INDICATION THAT THE EXCHANGES WILL WORK:

    "Based on the premiums that insurers have submitted for final regulatory approval,

    the majority of Californians buying coverage on the state's new insurance exchange will be paying less—in many cases, far less—than they would pay for equivalent coverage today.

    And while a minority will still end up writing bigger premium checks than they do now, even they won't be paying outrageous amounts. Meanwhile, all of these consumers will have access to the kind of comprehensive benefits that are frequently unavaiable today, at any price, because of the way insurers try to avoid the old and the sick."

    http://www.newrepublic.com/article/113289/obamacare-california-no-sticker-shock-here#
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    May 24, 2013 9:55 PM GMT
    Republicans and their foreign accomplices are heavily invested in a "Nightmare Scenario" for the Obama administration.

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    May 24, 2013 9:58 PM GMT
    blazerblue saidAND EVEN MORE INDICATION THAT THE EXCHANGES WILL WORK:

    "Based on the premiums that insurers have submitted for final regulatory approval,

    the majority of Californians buying coverage on the state's new insurance exchange will be paying less—in many cases, far less—than they would pay for equivalent coverage today.

    And while a minority will still end up writing bigger premium checks than they do now, even they won't be paying outrageous amounts. Meanwhile, all of these consumers will have access to the kind of comprehensive benefits that are frequently unavaiable today, at any price, because of the way insurers try to avoid the old and the sick."

    http://www.newrepublic.com/article/113289/obamacare-california-no-sticker-shock-here#


    Given that the exchanges haven't even started running yet, that's an optimistic projection. As noted, it's an open question. As also noted elsewhere, the Frank Dodd act has the ironic result of making it more difficult for the poorest to purchase health insurance.
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    May 24, 2013 10:05 PM GMT
    riddler, Do tell us how the Central Committee suggests we go about supplying healthcare.
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    May 24, 2013 10:12 PM GMT
    blazerblue saidriddler, Do tell us how the Central Committee suggests we go about supplying healthcare.


    It seems you're quite plugged in with the Central Committee. Doing a bit more research into California, you must have missed the part where a lot of those insurance rates are heavily subsidized. We'll see how it goes - using markets is the best way to drive down prices, but only if people use them and there's enough transparency.

    Unfortunately that still doesn't solve for the delivery of healthcare for which there are still a lot of issues. Did you know for instance, 4 of the largest insurers opted out of even pricing plans into this supposedly highly competitive market?

    http://moneymorning.com/2013/05/23/california-just-gave-us-a-glimpse-of-how-obamacare-will-fail/

    Today (Thursday), the Los Angeles Times reported that United Health, Aetna, and Cigna have opted out of the California insurance exchange.

    UnitedHealth has adopted a wait-and-see policy: "We are simply taking the time to carefully evaluate and better understand how the exchanges will work to ensure we are best prepared to participate meaningfully in their development," explains a spokesman to the LA Times.

    Cigna resolved to participate in exchanges in only half of the 10 states where it sells individual health policies, and California didn't make the cut.


    Even your own article notes that Blue Cross's premiums are going to be 13% higher (even if it's lower than expected)
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    Jul 25, 2013 6:49 AM GMT
    "New Health-Care Law's Success Rests on the Young
    Will Young and Healthy Give Up Disposable Income to Pay for Insurance?"

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324263404578613700273320428.html?mod=WSJ_hps_LEFTTopStories

    The success of the new health-care law rides in large measure on whether young, healthy people like Gabe Meiffren, a cook at a Korean-Hawaiian food cart, decide to give up a chunk of disposable income to pay for insurance. [...]

    Interviews here with more than two dozen single workers of modest income between 24 and 31 years old suggest that insurance plans will be a hard sell. Subsidies for 26-year-old workers range from $118 a month for someone earning under $16,000 to less than $1 a month for one earning $26,500, according to an analysis of insurance data.

    For Mr. Meiffren, the cheapest available insurance plan he could buy with the subsidies would cost him $116 a month, with a $6,350 annual deductible. His subsidy would total $14 a month, based on his $25,000 annual income. [...]

    "For healthy young people, I believe that these new rates are not likely to be attractive enough" compared with the no-coverage penalty, said John W. Rowe, chief executive of the health insurer Aetna AET +0.40% until 2006 and a health policy professor at Columbia University, speaking broadly about the marketplaces. [...]

    For some people, however, the math doesn't work. The $29,000 annual pay that Jonathan Scarboro expects to earn this year as a $14-an-hour, full-time mechanic at Velocult—a combination bike shop and cafe-bar—is too high for a subsidy. The cheapest plan would cost him $147 a month and carry a $6,350 deductible for many services, including hospital care. For $172 a month, he could buy a plan with a $2,500 deductible.

    "I'm not going to pay for that," said Mr. Scarboro, age 30. "It breaks down to: Can I afford it? And, am I getting my money's worth?"

    The uninsured can get care at pay-by-the-visit urgent care centers and clinics. "I've already seen quite a few" young, lower-wage workers, said Carolyn Nowosielski, a nurse practitioner at the Oregon Health & Science University clinic that here opened in June.



  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Jul 25, 2013 11:04 AM GMT
    YAWN

    Over it already
    It's gonna happen bro ... and once people see the benefits posts like this are gonna be funny

    right now it's just boring

    BTW I received a reimbursement from my Healthcare insurance for overpayments ..... Thanx Barack icon_biggrin.gif
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Nov 16, 2013 11:18 PM GMT
    obamacare a clusterfuck is real. his approval will now sink to an all time low for him. Mark my words.
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    Nov 16, 2013 11:47 PM GMT
    MikemikeMike saidobamacare a clusterfuck is real. his approval will now sink to an all time low for him. Mark my words.


    I'm beginning to think this will be Obama's last term.
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    Nov 19, 2013 2:30 AM GMT
    The Federal Register, dated June 17, 2010, beginning at page 34,552 (Vol. 75, No. 116) includes a chart that outlines the Obama administration’s projections.

    The chart indicates that somewhere between 39 and 69 percent of employer plans would lose their “grandfather” protection.

    For small-business employers, the high-end estimate is a staggering 80 percent (and even on the low end, it’s just a shade under half — 49 percent).


    During all these years, while Obama was repeatedly assuring Americans, “If you like your health-insurance plan, you can keep your health-insurance plan,” he actually expected as many as seven out of every ten Americans covered by employer plans to lose their coverage. For small business, Obama expected at least one out of every two Americans, or as many as four out of every five, to lose their coverage.

    Obama was spinning on last Thursday about how his broken promise affects only the teeny-weeny individual 5% insurance market.
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    Nov 19, 2013 2:46 AM GMT
    I love how funny this is!