How the U.S Government Hacks the World

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    May 25, 2013 4:43 AM GMT
    From Bloomberg Businessweek,

    The U.S. government doesn’t deny that it engages in cyber espionage. “You’re not waiting for someone to decide to turn information into electrons and photons and send it,” says Hayden (former head of NSA and CIA under Bush). “You’re commuting to where the information is stored and extracting the information from the adversaries’ network. We are the best at doing it. Period.” The U.S. position is that some kinds of hacking are more acceptable than others—and the kind the NSA does is in keeping with unofficial, unspoken rules going back to the Cold War about what secrets are OK for one country to steal from another. “China is doing stuff you’re not supposed to do,” says Jacob Olcott, a principal at Good Harbor Security Risk Management, a Washington firm that advises hacked companies.
    ...
    Intelligence officials say one way to exert pressure on China is to change the subject from spying to trade—threatening restrictions on imports of goods made using stolen technology, or withholding visas for employees of companies that make such products.
    ...
    The bottom line: Using automated hacking tools, NSA cyberspies pilfer 2 petabytes of data every hour from computers worldwide.
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    May 25, 2013 7:10 PM GMT
    Misandry saidBullshit. Its China, those damn dirty apes.


    Remember "Planet of the Apes" was about the future.icon_lol.gif
  • The_Guruburu

    Posts: 895

    May 25, 2013 7:22 PM GMT
    zukunft saidFrom Bloomberg Businessweek,

    The U.S. government doesn’t deny that it engages in cyber espionage. “You’re not waiting for someone to decide to turn information into electrons and photons and send it,” says Hayden (former head of NSA and CIA under Bush). “You’re commuting to where the information is stored and extracting the information from the adversaries’ network. We are the best at doing it. Period.” The U.S. position is that some kinds of hacking are more acceptable than others—and the kind the NSA does is in keeping with unofficial, unspoken rules going back to the Cold War about what secrets are OK for one country to steal from another. “China is doing stuff you’re not supposed to do,” says Jacob Olcott, a principal at Good Harbor Security Risk Management, a Washington firm that advises hacked companies.
    ...
    Intelligence officials say one way to exert pressure on China is to change the subject from spying to trade—threatening restrictions on imports of goods made using stolen technology, or withholding visas for employees of companies that make such products.
    ...
    The bottom line: Using automated hacking tools, NSA cyberspies pilfer 2 petabytes of data every hour from computers worldwide.


    Summary: "The way we steal info is okay because the U.S. is #1 and we wrote the book on whats right and wrong, and c'mon, who's seriously going to tell us that we're wrong? But China is totes violating the sacred Thieves' Code of Ethics because they're our enemy and everything they do is wrong wrong wrong.
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    May 25, 2013 7:58 PM GMT
    Wake me when the US stoops to this level:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/23/world/asia/in-china-hacking-has-widespread-acceptance.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/20/world/asia/chinese-hackers-resume-attacks-on-us-targets.html?pagewanted=all

    I EXPECT the US government to actively thwart terrorism at every opportunity.

    And, I also expect it will be a while before China realizes IPR is actually worth protecting, especially when it is their own (or at least they claim it as their own.)
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    May 25, 2013 8:04 PM GMT
    Both the U.S. and china are equally to blame for cyber attacks. the U.S. has to think that it need to govern the world, while china is just keeping tracking on their debts. Both countries need to grow a pair and stop spying on each other. The only reason why this is even a concern to the U.S. is because the companies running the U.S. are having their products stolen and made cheaper thanks to china. If china wasn't making things cheaper, than the U.S. wouldn't give two shits as long as they still make money.
  • The_Guruburu

    Posts: 895

    May 25, 2013 8:19 PM GMT
    Gym_bull saidBoth the U.S. and china are equally to blame for cyber attacks. the U.S. has to think that it need to govern the world, while china is just keeping tracking on their debts. Both countries need to grow a pair and stop spying on each other. The only reason why this is even a concern to the U.S. is because the companies running the U.S. are having their products stolen and made cheaper thanks to china. If china wasn't making things cheaper, than the U.S. wouldn't give two shits as long as they still make money.



    You say that as though there's another reason to care about anything other than money.
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    May 25, 2013 8:39 PM GMT
    Gym_bull saidBoth the U.S. and china are equally to blame for cyber attacks. the U.S. has to think that it need to govern the world, while china is just keeping tracking on their debts...


    Uh?

    I expect the US to prevent terrorist attacks (again.)

    China knows they are not an island. The US imports a significant percentage of their production. China's enthusiasm for stealing economically valuable data from Western companies grows unabated.
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    May 27, 2013 7:04 AM GMT
    @ RobertF64

    You said twice that the government needs to stop terrorism. What did you mean exactly?
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    May 27, 2013 7:07 AM GMT
    zukunft said@ RobertF64

    You said twice that the government needs to stop terrorism. What did you mean exactly?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuxnet