Comprehensive analysis of impact spherules supports theory of cosmic impact 12,800 years ago

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    May 26, 2013 11:28 PM GMT
    http://phys.org/news/2013-05-comprehensive-analysis-impact-spherules-theory.html

    About 12,800 years ago when the Earth was warming and emerging from the last ice age, a dramatic and anomalous event occurred that abruptly reversed climatic conditions back to near-glacial state. According to James Kennett, UC Santa Barbara emeritus professor in earth sciences, this climate switch fundamentally –– and remarkably –– occurred in only one year, heralding the onset of the Younger Dryas cool episode.
  • He_Man

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    May 27, 2013 1:09 AM GMT
    I call shenanigans! Everyone knows that the Earth is only 10,000 years old. Nice try..
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    May 27, 2013 1:26 PM GMT
    http://phys.org/news/2013-05-comprehensive-analysis-impact-spherules-theory.html

    "Comprehensive Analysis" and the article does not even say where the impact occurred. Then, the first comment under the article asks the same question, where did the impact occur?

    In Egyptology, something happened around the same time to cause structural damage to one of the Giza pyramids. (An interesting book is Giza Power Plant by Christopher Dunn.)
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    May 27, 2013 1:32 PM GMT
    StephenOABC said
    http://phys.org/news/2013-05-comprehensive-analysis-impact-spherules-theory.html

    "Comprehensive Analysis" and the article does not even say where the impact occurred. Then, the first comment under the article asks the same question, where did the impact occur?

    A major impact event 12,800 years ago would have left a crater that could not have eroded yet. An ocean impact great enough to throw debris into the atmosphere would have also left a seabed crater, and maps of the seafloor show no recent crater.
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    May 27, 2013 1:38 PM GMT
    Surely if it was large enough to start an ice age, it was large enough to have deformed the crust, and been filled in by siesmic shocks, quakes and magma bursting from the rupture?
  • thatirishbast...

    Posts: 3523

    May 27, 2013 1:55 PM GMT
    He_Man saidI call shenanigans! Everyone knows that the Earth is only 10,000 years old. Nice try..


    Heresy. The earth is 6017 years old. Obviduh.
  • Rhi_Bran

    Posts: 904

    May 27, 2013 4:38 PM GMT
    ART_DECO said
    StephenOABC said
    http://phys.org/news/2013-05-comprehensive-analysis-impact-spherules-theory.html

    "Comprehensive Analysis" and the article does not even say where the impact occurred. Then, the first comment under the article asks the same question, where did the impact occur?

    A major impact event 12,800 years ago would have left a crater that could not have eroded yet. An ocean impact great enough to throw debris into the atmosphere would have also left a seabed crater, and maps of the seafloor show no recent crater.


    Yup. I'm absolutely shocked that they didn't even address a crater in the article. If it were an impact big enough to alter the global climate and starve out the megafauna, there should be a big bloody gash somewhere. And why didn't it starve out ancient humans for that matter, since such an event would have wiped out most of their animal food supplies in less than a year? I mean, I know that human population bottlenecked in the past, but that event was 70,000 years ago and has been definitely linked to the eruption of a supervolcano in Indonesia.