Finding a good gay (or gay friendly) psychiatrist

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 27, 2013 10:43 PM GMT
    My mother's death and my father's abuse make me think it's time to see a shrink. Obviously, I'd like one who can prescribe drugs and is gay. Any suggestions on how to find a good one?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 28, 2013 1:25 AM GMT
    Tough to say... you might want to first see a general physician/family doctor and get a referral or something. I can tell you though (based on my experience at least) that, as well publicized as those crazy homophobic, I-will-make-you-straight type of psychiatrists are, most psychiatrists are gay friendly.

    With the three psychiatrists that I've worked with before, none of them flinched or seemed awkward when I talked about my sexual encounter with other men, fantasies and what not that would make most heteros feel a bit uncomfortable. It definitely is difficult though to find a psychiatrist that you can be compatible with.

    What I can recommend with confidence is that you need to be patient and give the psychiatrist enough time to warm up to you, and not be so hasty to switch psychiatrist... unless if he/she turns out to be homophobic or super biased. Also, make sure you don't hold back anything when you are talking with one. Remember that they are like any other doctors, and the more information you provide them with, the more they'll have to work with to help you resolve your problems. Many experienced psychiatrists have heard all types of stories so don't ever feel like you have to filter or censor yourself out. Be open and also be patient.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 28, 2013 2:00 AM GMT
    There are definitely a decent # of gays in psych who are out but informiately I've never worked in your area to name any.

    Let me say that psych docs (gay or straight) should absolutely be able to at least be comfortable listeners as you details aspect of your sexuality relevant to whatever you are going through. Psych focuses on behavior & what influences behavior. It is less about judging your actions (gay or whatever) & more about seeing how to improve your functioning in the environment or situation your find yourself in. Give docs the benefit of the doubt on this one! Don't hurt yourself by waiting on finding a gay doc
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    May 28, 2013 2:09 AM GMT
    As I understand it pyschiatrists are MD's who are able to prescribe and phsychologists do not have medical degrees and do not prescribe. It also seems to be the trend these days that the psychiatrists tend to do less counseling and more prescribing than they did in the past. the idea of getting guidance from a GP who knows you is a good one.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 28, 2013 2:45 AM GMT
    There. Can't guarantee you'll find a GOOD one but most of the ones I've looked up in the past deal with Gay/Lesbian issues. icon_cool.gif
  • Joeyphx444

    Posts: 2382

    May 28, 2013 2:58 AM GMT
    Why? So they can agree with you on everything you say and make you a pill addict?

    Why pay someone to listen to you and nod every once in a while?

    Do a group thing or talk to your real friends
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 28, 2013 5:28 AM GMT
    A former GP got me on SSRI drugs (Lexapro, Celexa).

    It worked. But, SSRI's generally "mess with your dick" in a bad way.

    Your general physician might be able to give you samples to try.

    Lexapro, otherwise a wonder drug, interfered with my thought process (which is what you want if you tend to focus relentlessly on issues. Bad, if it interferes with being able to remember people's names.)

    Getting off of it wasn't easy after two years (my body adjusted and it stopped working.) They weren't kidding when they say it gives you suicidal thoughts if you try to wean yourself off too quickly. It is important to back off the dose *very slowly*. It took two weeks for the drug to build up in my system and start working. It took about two weeks before I noticed I needed to take time off of work and refill the prescription.

    Only drug I still take from that drug-pushing GP is recreational Cialis. B-)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 28, 2013 5:39 AM GMT
    Joeyphx444 saidWhy? So they can agree with you on everything you say and make you a pill addict?

    Why pay someone to listen to you and nod every once in a while?

    Do a group thing or talk to your real friends

    If that's all you think that a psychiatrist does, you have fallen hook, line and sinker for the classic media portrayal of the profession. Yes, psychiatrists can prescribe drugs (unlike psychologists) and yes, drugs are particularly overprescribed in America. But it would be foolish to think that all mental health issues are solvable just by talking to real life friends or going to a support group. Peer/social support is an important part of anyone's life with respect to dealing with issues, but there are some mental health issues that do require medication. Someone's real life friends or a support group are not qualified to make that call, nor can they change the fact that drugs may be needed.

    A good psychiatrist will refer someone to a psychologist when it is evident that something such as cognitive behavioural therapy would be more effective than a drug (with none of the physical/psychological dependency or side effects that can come with drugs). A good psychologist will refer someone to a psychiatrist when it is evident that a person falls into a mental health category that makes a drug-based solution highly recommended or required. Either way, they are doing more than just listen to someone talk about their problems. They are checking for symptoms, thought patterns and history that might lead to an accurate diagnosis (or non-diagnosis in some cases) for that person, and that's far more than any average Joe is capable of doing.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 28, 2013 5:41 AM GMT
    SSRI's don't "generally" mess with your dick but anorgasmia is the most common sexual side effect experienced by those who do experience sexual side effects.

    Lexapro is generally accepted to have the best side effec profile. Meaning least side effects experienced by those takin it.

    Evidence based medicine suggests that a combination of therapy & medication are the best to treat depression & other mood disorders.
  • charrismd

    Posts: 112

    May 28, 2013 5:41 AM GMT
    The Gay and Lesbian Medical Association has a physician/healthcare provider service. http://www.glma.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.viewPage&pageId=939&grandparentID=534&parentID=938&nodeID=1

    Do check out the list for a local provider.

    All the best as you make the very strong statement on your own health.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 28, 2013 5:56 AM GMT
    Enigmatic_me saidSSRI's don't "generally" mess with your dick but anorgasmia is the most common sexual side effect experienced by those who do experience sexual side effects.

    Lexapro is generally accepted to have the best side effec profile. Meaning least side effects experienced by those takin it.

    Evidence based medicine suggests that a combination of therapy & medication are the best to treat depression & other mood disorders.


    Lexapro was an excellent temporary measure for me. Definitely taught me it takes mental focus to reach an orgasm.

    But, it could affect an otherwise solid relationship. I've had coworkers flat out resist taking anything that prevents them from fulfilling their husbandry duties. icon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 28, 2013 11:34 AM GMT
    Before going to a Psychiatrist,
    did you shared your feelings with someone close to you? If not share them
    because a lonely or secretive person is more vulnerable to depression.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 28, 2013 1:25 PM GMT
    RobertF64 said
    Enigmatic_me saidSSRI's don't "generally" mess with your dick but anorgasmia is the most common sexual side effect experienced by those who do experience sexual side effects.

    Lexapro is generally accepted to have the best side effec profile. Meaning least side effects experienced by those takin it.

    Evidence based medicine suggests that a combination of therapy & medication are the best to treat depression & other mood disorders.


    Lexapro was an excellent temporary measure for me. Definitely taught me it takes mental focus to reach an orgasm.

    But, it could affect an otherwise solid relationship. I've had coworkers flat out resist taking anything that prevents them from fulfilling their husbandry duties. icon_cool.gif



    I have shared the same experience with people I know & patients. Guys really feel strongly about their functioning below the belt & who can blame them. Although, depression can lower sexual functioning as well.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 28, 2013 8:24 PM GMT
    LJay saidAs I understand it pyschiatrists are MD's who are able to prescribe and phsychologists do not have medical degrees and do not prescribe. It also seems to be the trend these days that the psychiatrists tend to do less counseling and more prescribing than they did in the past. the idea of getting guidance from a GP who knows you is a good one.


    THIS

    Definitely investigate this option, you may benefit greater from a psychologist or therapist...then talk to you doctor if you and your therapist feel meds are needed.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 28, 2013 8:44 PM GMT
    Obviously, I'd like one who can prescribe drugs and is gay.

    I'll settle for bi-curious but yes, I echo your sentiment daily.
  • Joeyphx444

    Posts: 2382

    May 28, 2013 8:54 PM GMT
    juvenescences said
    Joeyphx444 saidWhy? So they can agree with you on everything you say and make you a pill addict?

    Why pay someone to listen to you and nod every once in a while?

    Do a group thing or talk to your real friends

    If that's all you think that a psychiatrist does, you have fallen hook, line and sinker for the classic media portrayal of the profession. Yes, psychiatrists can prescribe drugs (unlike psychologists) and yes, drugs are particularly overprescribed in America. But it would be foolish to think that all mental health issues are solvable just by talking to real life friends or going to a support group. Peer/social support is an important part of anyone's life with respect to dealing with issues, but there are some mental health issues that do require medication. Someone's real life friends or a support group are not qualified to make that call, nor can they change the fact that drugs may be needed.

    A good psychiatrist will refer someone to a psychologist when it is evident that something such as cognitive behavioural therapy would be more effective than a drug (with none of the physical/psychological dependency or side effects that can come with drugs). A good psychologist will refer someone to a psychiatrist when it is evident that a person falls into a mental health category that makes a drug-based solution highly recommended or required. Either way, they are doing more than just listen to someone talk about their problems. They are checking for symptoms, thought patterns and history that might lead to an accurate diagnosis (or non-diagnosis in some cases) for that person, and that's far more than any average Joe is capable of doing.


    The OP needs a therapist to help him before he drowns his sorrows in drugs
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 28, 2013 9:09 PM GMT
    Joeyphx444 said

    The OP needs a therapist to help him before he drowns his sorrows in drugs


    That I'll agree with. In Canada we don't have nearly the same problem with overprescription of drugs so I guess I just have a hard time envisioning the automatic response of "here, have drugs". As a psychologist in training I'm obviously biased towards cognitive therapy over any form of pill/drug unless it becomes absolutely necessary, and that's where I think we agree icon_cool.gif