Dilemma: gain muscle without gaining fat

  • WkA93

    Posts: 259

    May 28, 2013 4:39 AM GMT
    In terms if diet I am keeping my protein at the sufficient amount to gain muscle
    Fibre is up. Fats come from lil bit of healthy oil and nuts. And carbs are mostly veggies, quinoa and black/brown rice. And I eat 6 small meals a day

    If I increase my calories buy incorporate HIIT runs into every week of training could I gain muscle without gaining a significant amount of fat?
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    May 28, 2013 5:40 PM GMT
    WkA93 saidIn terms if diet I am keeping my protein at the sufficient amount to gain muscle
    Fibre is up. Fats come from lil bit of healthy oil and nuts. And carbs are mostly veggies, quinoa and black/brown rice. And I eat 6 small meals a day

    If I increase my calories buy incorporate HIIT runs into every week of training could I gain muscle without gaining a significant amount of fat?



    Paleo diet!
  • gwuinsf

    Posts: 525

    May 28, 2013 10:42 PM GMT
    I also question the statement "Fats come from lil bit of healthy oil and nuts"

    How much is "lil bit"? Toss all that business about fat making you fat out the window. You probably need to up your fat intake.

    Track your food in a food planner and post your macros.
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    May 28, 2013 10:54 PM GMT
    http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nutrition/excess-protein-and-fat-storage-qa.html


    This source says no; Protein will not be converted to fat. The conversion of Protein to Fat would be a long process for the body to do, and most likely would only happen in the instance that your body is WAYYYY over-supplied with all other nutrients that it could possibly strip out of the protein molecule.


    But there are also a zillion which say Yes - it is converted into fat! This is why I hate science. Can't Jesus just tell me the correct answer?!icon_evil.gificon_rolleyes.gificon_lol.gif
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    May 29, 2013 12:46 AM GMT
    Unintended said
    JeanDeau saidhttp://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nutrition/excess-protein-and-fat-storage-qa.html


    This source says no; Protein will not be converted to fat. The conversion of Protein to Fat would be a long process for the body to do, and most likely would only happen in the instance that your body is WAYYYY over-supplied with all other nutrients that it could possibly strip out of the protein molecule.


    But there are also a zillion which say Yes - it is converted into fat! This is why I hate science. Can't Jesus just tell me the correct answer?!icon_evil.gificon_rolleyes.gificon_lol.gif


    Complete an utter nonsense that does not even stand the "common sense" test. If simply eat protein was the answer to obesity, nobody would be fat.

    However, the ratio of protein to fat conversion is the low. 95% of excess fat is stored as fat, reflecting how easy fat is stored. 85% excess of carbohydrate is stored as fat. I forget the percentage for protein, it is like 80%. I need to run but I will get the correct number.

    BTW, the methodology is to establish an diet that is in energy balance then feed an excess and note the effects.

    It boggles my mind on how wrong these muscle heads are regarding protein. I suspect that their websites sell protein supplements has a lot to do with it...



    Well, Pure protein is the first stage of the Dukan Diet, which has documented positive effects as well. When I had crazy food-reactions a few years ago I was put on it for 2 weeks, and was literally eating nothing but PURE protein, cottage cheese, greek yogurt, chicken breast, turkey etc. etc. in as much quanitity as I wanted - i.e. eat as much as I liked - and I ended up LOSING weight, while still maintining strength.

    I guess the thing is all bodies handle different nutrients differently. Our chemical composition is different, and chemicals are what digest the nutrients...

    Like I said, why can't Jesus just give me teh ansir!
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    May 30, 2013 2:30 AM GMT
    Unintended saidHypothetically, I agree that a high protein diet should facilitate not only weight loss but lean body mass gain.

    1) Next to alcohol, protein has the highest thermic effect of any food. Thus, on a pure protein diet in theory an individual can consume 10% more protein calories than carb calories and not gain weight.

    2) Protein is satiating.

    However, the following seems to dispel the notion:

    http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmoa0804748

    Keep in mind a very high protein diet was not examined.

    However, this indicates increased lean muscle mass from protein:

    http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1103993

    Much can contribute to "weight" loss in a diet's early stages. The best example is most inadvertently reduce salt consumption; thus, water loss, not fat loss is responsible for most of the initial weight loss.

    Most are highly motivated when they begin a diet, there are no controls and no accurate measurements. Thus, no individual can make any valid claim as to real underlying factors leading to weight loss.

    I am not a fan of fad diets and I discourage them. Actually, I am not a fan of any "diet" other than a life-long commitment to wellness.

    For example, a good straight friend of mine who is morbidly obese was somehow convinced to go on a juice diet by a friend of his whom I do not know and who is without any qualifications, but decided to become a "juice diet guru."

    I can go on and on why juice diets are wrong, mostly because the vegetable fiber is discarded. However, it motivated my friend to lose nearly 80 pounds and in my book, if it works for you it is fine by me.


    I like this sort of informed discussion.
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    Jun 01, 2013 8:33 PM GMT
    JeanDeau saidhttp://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nutrition/excess-protein-and-fat-storage-qa.html


    This source says no; Protein will not be converted to fat. The conversion of Protein to Fat would be a long process for the body to do, and most likely would only happen in the instance that your body is WAYYYY over-supplied with all other nutrients that it could possibly strip out of the protein molecule.


    But there are also a zillion which say Yes - it is converted into fat! This is why I hate science. Can't Jesus just tell me the correct answer?!icon_evil.gificon_rolleyes.gificon_lol.gif


    While you will get a million different answers, each body is different. Your Somatotype (google it) will dictate more exactly how to gain muscle without the leasta mount of fat. See a nutritionist, it will cost you some money but WELL worth it to have someone take time to examine your body type, eating habits, and track your gains on a minute level. But in essence, gaining is about calories. The rest is the quality of calories you choose to consume. Just make sure if you want rapid gains cardio MUST be limited. Otherwise you produce cortisol (a catabloic hormone) from the stress cardio puts on your body. Be sure to be at a surplus of GLUTAMINE it helps to preserve any uscle you have gained. Theres my two cents.