NYC Launches Bike Share Program, Largest in Nation

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 29, 2013 12:25 AM GMT
    More cities need to do this.

    http://www.wunderground.com/news/nyc-bike-share-20130528
  • Import

    Posts: 7190

    May 29, 2013 1:13 AM GMT
    thats so progressive, NYC. icon_rolleyes.gif

    way to go.

    *sips on 52oz coke with free refills
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 11, 2013 8:05 PM GMT
    I like the bike share program with one large misgiving. It only covers the Mid-town and below areas. For us uptowners, we feel left out.

    I still got an annual membership but I decided to make it part of my morning workout before work. Walk three miles to nearest bike station, ride two miles to gym, workout, shower and ride 1/4 mile to work. 5 days a week. Somebody told me I'm insane; probably but I work out everyday. icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 11, 2013 10:38 PM GMT
    I do Bike Share in DC and love it. We have 150 stations all around the city and I use it probably more than Metro. When it gets cooler I will use it even more without worrying about sweating tons.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 06, 2013 4:07 AM GMT
    Potemkin Village.

    Leaving Town

    Metro New York hemorrhaged $49 billion during the 2000s as residents sought opportunity elsewhere.
    Internal Revenue Service data show that the greater New York area suffered a net loss of 1.4 million domestic migrants from 2000 to 2010.

    The New York metropolitan region is losing people.

    Though the region and New York City itself continue to grow overall because they have more births than deaths, the Census Bureau estimates that the metro area lost almost 2 million net domestic migrants during the 2000s; that is, 2 million more people left the area for other parts of America than moved there from other parts of America.

    The region offset part of that loss with a nation-leading net gain of more than 1.1 million international immigrants over the same period.

    But it wasn’t enough: the region’s total net loss of people to migration amounted to 858,000. And the trend has continued into the new decade, with the New York metro area hemorrhaging another 254,000 net domestic migrants since 2010, even as the economic downturn has slowed migration generally within the United States.

    http://www.city-journal.org/2013/special-issue_migration.html