Scientists Crack HIV Coating, Leading to Possible AIDS Cure

  • metta

    Posts: 39144

    May 30, 2013 8:14 PM GMT
    Scientists Crack HIV Coating, Leading to Possible AIDS Cure


    http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2013/05/29/scientists-crack-hiv-coating-leading-to-possible-aids-cure
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 31, 2013 12:50 AM GMT
    Yeah... I have one major gripe with this article. HIV particles hold RNA and not DNA. Reverse transcription of the RNA into double stranded DNA occurs within the host's cell and the resulting viral DNA is transported into the nucleus. Once inside the nucleus, the viral DNA is integrated with the host's DNA which leads to the hijacking of the cell.

    Also, the process of reverse transcription can be quite inaccurate which is what causes the rapid mutations of the surface glycoproteins (though they did suggest that mutations affecting the capsid occurs less frequently).There's nothing to stop a mutation leading to a change in structure of the capsid proteins which, would therefore render anything targeting those particular proteins ineffective as protein-protein interactions are highly specific.

    That being said, I'm sure this will open more avenues for potential drug targets so fingers crossed for some good news!
  • LuckyGuyKC

    Posts: 2080

    May 31, 2013 2:31 AM GMT
    rwhh saidYeah... I have one major gripe with this article. HIV particles hold RNA and not DNA. Reverse transcription of the RNA into double stranded DNA occurs within the host's cell and the resulting viral DNA is transported into the nucleus. Once inside the nucleus, the viral DNA is integrated with the host's DNA which leads to the hijacking of the cell.

    Also, the process of reverse transcription can be quite inaccurate which is what causes the rapid mutations of the surface glycoproteins (though they did suggest that mutations affecting the capsid occurs less frequently).There's nothing to stop a mutation leading to a change in structure of the capsid proteins which, would therefore render anything targeting those particular proteins ineffective as protein-protein interactions are highly specific.

    That being said, I'm sure this will open more avenues for potential drug targets so fingers crossed for some good news!


    AGREED! [pretends to understand and now putting away dictionary]
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 31, 2013 10:57 AM GMT
    Every couple of months, there's a new breakthrough that "could lead to a cure for HIV/AIDS." Hopefully, this will be the one that actually does it, but I'm not getting my hopes up. The virus is so complex, and humans seem to be the perfect host based on the way it transmits and replicates within cells. It's as impressive as it is terrifying.
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    May 31, 2013 3:32 PM GMT
    After 28 years of living with "no cure" and "possible cure" news, I'm sure that science will eventually figure it out.

    In the mean time, I will believe it when I see it.

    Anybody remember mixing up and freezing their own "AL-721"?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 31, 2013 4:01 PM GMT
    rwhh saidYeah... I have one major gripe with this article. HIV particles hold RNA and not DNA. Reverse transcription of the RNA into double stranded DNA occurs within the host's cell and the resulting viral DNA is transported into the nucleus. Once inside the nucleus, the viral DNA is integrated with the host's DNA which leads to the hijacking of the cell.

    Also, the process of reverse transcription can be quite inaccurate which is what causes the rapid mutations of the surface glycoproteins (though they did suggest that mutations affecting the capsid occurs less frequently).There's nothing to stop a mutation leading to a change in structure of the capsid proteins which, would therefore render anything targeting those particular proteins ineffective as protein-protein interactions are highly specific.

    That being said, I'm sure this will open more avenues for potential drug targets so fingers crossed for some good news!


    Yeah, on the one hand I could see how a non-scientist could make a one-letter mistake and/or be clueless about the difference between DNA and RNA. On the other hand, regarding biomolecular science that's a huge mistake that makes me question the reporters entire comprehension of the study.

  • May 31, 2013 5:13 PM GMT
    this is good news, no doubt about it. i'm just curious about the viral particles that have already implanted themselves in the host cell's genome. some cells take longer than others to regenerate.