Impatiens disease

  • johndubuque

    Posts: 319

    Jun 03, 2013 2:33 AM GMT
    Any gardeners encountering impatiens disease, the mildew that is hurting many of them? What works to stop it?
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    Jun 03, 2013 4:16 AM GMT
    http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/lifestyles/home-garden/impatiens-disease-hits-garden-season/nXgXH/
    Once plants have been diagnosed, the disease can live in the soil for 10 years.

    Well that sucks. No experience with it myself but just wondering if a copper spray might do anything as it can be very effective on fungus. I don't know the science but isn't mildew sort of fungus-ish?
  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Jun 03, 2013 5:04 AM GMT
    Have you tried Actinovate yet? Supposed to work on all mildews.
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    Jun 03, 2013 5:33 AM GMT
    "Actinovate" was "invented/discovered" by a personal friend of mine. While he cannot be blamed for all of the hype surrounding it - well, n/m - if it works at all, it is as a preventative. Not a cure.

    Many times, fungal problems are due to excess humidity. If you can control that, it helps to have a relatively "dry" period every day. And apply irrigation to the soil, not to the air.
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    Jun 03, 2013 12:53 PM GMT
    This is an oomycete or "water mold," which is in a different kingdom than fungi. If you have it you'll want a "fungicide" which is suited to water molds rather than your true fungi.
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    Jun 03, 2013 1:04 PM GMT
    Chlorothalonil is a good systemic fungicide that takes care of water molds and phytophthora ; Chlorothalonil-containing products are sold under the names Bravo, Echo, and Daconil.
    I've used it to control water molds that we're wiping out coleus, New guinea impatiens, and lavender.
  • camfer

    Posts: 892

    Jun 03, 2013 1:29 PM GMT
    A lot of the wholesale growers have eliminated impatiens from production or drastically cut back on the numbers they grow due to impatiens downy mildew (IDM). Breeders are surely working on developing new regular impatiens that resist IDM.

    Just pull the plants out and burn them or bag them up in plastic for the landfill. The spores travel far, so if there's a problem at your place, there's a problem throughout the entire neighborhood, if not for miles around.

    You can grow New Guinea Impatiens, which are tolerant of the disease, tend to be larger, and can also take more sun.



  • Suetonius

    Posts: 1842

    Jun 03, 2013 4:03 PM GMT
    If the target disease is a water mold or a Phytophthera, you might try Aliette as a preventative. Is also registered a s a preventative for downy mildew in some crops.
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    Jun 03, 2013 5:19 PM GMT
    I thought there is no cure for this and it has to run its course through the plant stock... In Chicago most ethical nurseries are not selling impatiens this year as there is nothing to prevent them from succumbing to the fungus.

    I hear it may be a few years before you can plant them again....
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    Jun 05, 2013 2:09 AM GMT
    I like impatiens planted en masse like on Park Avenue. And they're planted there for a reason - they're the go-to annual for lazy shade gardeners and black thumbs. So this disease is surprising.