No carbohydrates after 6pm?

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    Jun 04, 2013 8:56 PM GMT
    I've read somewhere that apparently it's a great way to loose fat because carbs give you energy that turns into fat if not fully digested by the time you hit the pillow.

    I eat only carbs (oatmeal, fruits etc) before 12pm and vary till 6pm my balance, then just fat/protein(chops, turkey, eggs) thereafter. Is this healthy and does it in fact help you lower your body fat percentage?
  • mybud

    Posts: 11837

    Jun 05, 2013 4:54 AM GMT
    It's bro-science...stay within your calorie numbers and eat whatever you want..when you want....
  • pelotudo87

    Posts: 225

    Jun 05, 2013 5:01 AM GMT
    Hi,

    There is debate within the fitness community over whether or not eating a lot of carbs at night can make you gain weight. However, what everyone does agree on is that eating above your caloric needs is bad. Everyone has different requirements in terms of the three macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats). Figure out what your caloric needs are, and then (assuming your goal is weight loss), create a slight deficit of 10-20% per day (ie. if you need 2,000 calories to maintain your weight, try taking in 1,800 per day). Combine with strength training to maintain your muscle mass to keep your metabolic rate up, and then you should lose weight.

    Good luck!
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    Jun 05, 2013 8:40 AM GMT
    pelotudo87 saidHi,

    There is debate within the fitness community over whether or not eating a lot of carbs at night can make you gain weight. However, what everyone does agree on is that eating above your caloric needs is bad. Everyone has different requirements in terms of the three macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats). Figure out what your caloric needs are, and then (assuming your goal is weight loss), create a slight deficit of 10-20% per day (ie. if you need 2,000 calories to maintain your weight, try taking in 1,800 per day). Combine with strength training to maintain your muscle mass to keep your metabolic rate up, and then you should lose weight.

    Good luck!


    I have noticed some effects of this new change in diet, I am more tired at night and falling asleep better, but even though I am eating steak dinners I am HUNGRY as feck only a half hour after, protein really doesn't make you feel full :/
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    Jun 05, 2013 8:50 AM GMT
    ^^ Actually, protein does make you feel fuller relative to the other macros. Just a guess but you probably are not getting enough carbs (or maybe not getting the right kind of carbs ?) after noon relative to your daily caloric needs. That might explain the hunger/lethargy in the evening.
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    Jun 05, 2013 8:51 AM GMT
    I've stopped eating protein after 4p.

    Protein takes a while to digest, a slow food to digest.

    My body likes not having to digest protein in its wind down and sleep phase.

    This rule wouldn't be good for all the restaurants and chains.
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    Jun 05, 2013 9:01 AM GMT
    I can testify to this and many endomorph out there except i stop my simple carb eating at 12pm. It true your stomach in the evening acts as a furnace and burns the fat at your waist.
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    Jun 05, 2013 9:06 AM GMT
    Tenebrism said^^ Actually, protein does make you feel fuller relative to the other macros. Just a guess but you probably are not getting enough carbs (or maybe not getting the right kind of carbs ?) after noon relative to your daily caloric needs. That might explain the hunger/lethargy in the evening.


    I just ate a bowl of oatmeal this morning and my stomach is very bloated and full, and after I ate a steak and egg dinner last night I didn't feel the slightest bit full thereafter, carbs fill you, and do give you a lot of energy as the break down into sugar in your bloodstream.
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    Jun 05, 2013 9:11 AM GMT
    myolox saidI can testify to this and many endomorph out there except i stop my simple carb eating at 12pm. It's true your stomach in the evening acts as a furnace and burns the fat at your waist.


    Hmm, no pasta, starchy potatoes, starchy pizza, pumpkin pie, after 4p?

    Those Subway vegetable pattie 12" sandwiches have 12" of bread.
    Maybe the two black bean burritos from Taco Bell are better for me.

    I usually have yogurt or frozen yogurt sometime between 8 -10p.


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    Jun 05, 2013 9:17 AM GMT
    darren234 said
    Tenebrism said^^ Actually, protein does make you feel fuller relative to the other macros. Just a guess but you probably are not getting enough carbs (or maybe not getting the right kind of carbs ?) after noon relative to your daily caloric needs. That might explain the hunger/lethargy in the evening.


    I just ate a bowl of oatmeal this morning and my stomach is very bloated and full, and after I ate a steak and egg dinner last night I didn't feel the slightest bit full thereafter, carbs fill you, and do give you a lot of energy as the break down into sugar in your bloodstream.


    http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/diet.fitness/01/26/CL.satisfaction.guaranteed/

    Key paragraphs:

    Protein is the most satiating nutrient, says former Harvard University researcher Thomas Halton, Ph.D., who recently co-wrote review of 50 satiety studies in The Journal of the American College of Nutrition. Something about protein tells our bodies to stop eating it after a while. Researchers aren't quite sure of the mechanism but believe that part of protein's advantage may come from its thermic effect, the rate at which calories are consumed simply by the act of digesting food. "The digestion and absorption of protein takes more work than the digestion and absorption of fat and carbohydrates," Halton says. About 25 to 35 percent of protein calories are used as the body converts protein to energy; only five to 15 percent are used when carbohydrates are converted.

    Carbohydrates are the next most satiating foods. "The type of carbohydrate plays a role," Halton says. "Whole grains are more satiating than refined sugars and refined white flour." Whole grains, along with fruits and vegetables, tend to be filling because they contain higher levels of fiber. Unlike other food substances, fiber is not digested. It adds bulk to foods, which helps fill the stomach, slowing the rate at which food is digested. The result: You notice feelings of fullness sooner.


    *Edit to add* Just wanted to point out the hunger in the evening issue perhaps being related to the amount/types of carbs you eat earlier in the day in an effort to be helpful - sometimes the written word betrays me and my ultimate meaning is lost. I do wish you well and hope you find a great balance that works for you. icon_smile.gif
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    Jun 05, 2013 10:17 AM GMT
    mybud saidIt's bro-science...stay within your calorie numbers and eat whatever you want..when you want....



    +1
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 05, 2013 10:19 AM GMT
    That's stupid, if you control your diet then Carbohydrates doesn't matter when you eat it at.
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    Jun 05, 2013 10:48 AM GMT
    darren234 said
    Tenebrism said^^ Actually, protein does make you feel fuller relative to the other macros. Just a guess but you probably are not getting enough carbs (or maybe not getting the right kind of carbs ?) after noon relative to your daily caloric needs. That might explain the hunger/lethargy in the evening.


    I just ate a bowl of oatmeal this morning and my stomach is very bloated and full, and after I ate a steak and egg dinner last night I didn't feel the slightest bit full thereafter, carbs fill you, and do give you a lot of energy as the break down into sugar in your bloodstream.


    Your one example doesn't prove or disprove anything other than you tried to oversimply a concept in order to draw a conclusion that fits your already established worldview. There are so many other factors that may be caused these two different after effects that may not even have anything to do with the macronutrient makeup of your meals.
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    Jun 06, 2013 12:52 AM GMT
    Mcjr20 saidThat's stupid, if you control your diet then Carbohydrates doesn't matter when you eat it at.

    You're mother fucking right.

    Besides it would depend on when you go to bed. If you're going to bed at 9, yeah. If you're going to bed at 3 or 4 am...no.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 06, 2013 12:56 AM GMT
    Bro science or real science, I would not allow it to rule my eating times. Life's too short for crap like that.
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    Jun 06, 2013 3:10 AM GMT
    darren234 saidI've read somewhere that apparently it's a great way to loose fat because carbs give you energy that turns into fat if not fully digested by the time you hit the pillow.

    I eat only carbs (oatmeal, fruits etc) before 12pm and vary till 6pm my balance, then just fat/protein(chops, turkey, eggs) thereafter. Is this healthy and does it in fact help you lower your body fat percentage?


    It's stupid. You should eat carbs when the time is right. When is the time right? Right when you get up when you break the fast (breakfast), before exercise, and it's critical after exercise. Time of day has NOTHING to do with when it's the right time.

    Eat some carbs before bed, as long as it isn't a butt pile of sugar, will, help with satiation and help you get to sleep and to stay asleep.

    It's critical you carb up, and push protein post workout, if you expect to make any decent gains.

    Carbs don't turn into fat. They bind with water and oxygen and form glycogen and refuel your liver and muscles.

    High insulin levels, from high blood sugar can cause fat storage, but, that fat is usually fat to begin with, and not carbs, nor protein. (Study up on what it takes to convert carbs to fat, and what it takes to convert protein to fat.)

    God is real. Yeah, right. Doh.
  • pelotudo87

    Posts: 225

    Jun 06, 2013 3:22 AM GMT
    Darren,

    Have you sat down and calculated your macronutrient needs? You may be overeating protein and / or fat and not getting enough carbs (especially at night).

    Without knowing your exact diet and what your needs are, take Chucky's advice: a little bit of carbs at night will actually help you. How about adding some broccoli to your dinner? Broccoli has a lot of fiber as well, so it will help you feel full.
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    Jun 06, 2013 3:24 AM GMT
    Listen to your body. Everyone's body is different. Science is great and all but seems to be a law of averages. When I eat sugary carbs before bed, it sabotages any weight loss efforts regardless of my caloric intake. The only time I've lost weight, and lost it consistently is when I've drastically cut out the sugary stuff. I can eat rice, veggies, even nuts without issue, and can even eat fatty stuff too,and maintain or lose weight.
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    Jun 06, 2013 3:35 AM GMT
    Total crap.

    It's the sorta thing Chix Mags put on their covers.

    Eat REAL food when You are hungry.

    Stop when You are full.

    NEVER go Hungry -- EVER.
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    Jun 07, 2013 7:41 AM GMT
    I just canĀ“t even....
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    Jun 07, 2013 9:23 AM GMT
    Of course it can turn into fat quicker. All carbohydrates can be broken down in the body into sugars. These saccharides, or simple carbohydrates, go through carbohydrate catabolism, which is the combustion of the carbohydrates to retrieve the energy in their bonds. The glucose in the saccharides are what break down into energy. When you think about it, at night the average person is using less energy then he is in the day time. When youre sleeping, your body is working over time to break down those glucose carbohydrates into energy, and the remaining carbohydrates that await too long to become broken down to energy become fats. When you eat past a certain time, which is usually around midnight, you are throwing your bodies natural clock off for proper digestion of foods, and in which if your body has too much of carbohydrates which usually occurs in most who eat at late times because of the fact theyre more at rest, the overwhelming amount of glucose carbohydrates causes a blood glucose spike. When too much glucose enriched carbohydrates is introduced to the body, your pancreas secretes an abundance of insulin following blood glucose spike because that glucose was not broken down into energy in time therefore it causes the blood glucose spike, which triggers the liver to produce triglycerides, which are fat in the blood. These triglycerides form fat cells. 6 PM is still a little too early to strict yourself to give up on eating. Remember, you want to try and have 5 small meals a day rather than 3 large. You also want to make sure you proper portion your meals, which you can easily factor by diving the food into calories and noting the amount of servings per item, dividing into equal quantities of both the calories and servings. All foods are marked as having proper portions equivalent to one serving, it is unethical if they do not. I cannot stress how much high fiber carbohydrates are the best choice, however that is just my opinion. I hope this helps.
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    Jun 07, 2013 6:06 PM GMT
    mybud saidIt's bro-science...stay within your calorie numbers and eat whatever you want..when you want....



    Well there are SOME things to stay away from you know lol
  • rnch

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    Jun 07, 2013 6:35 PM GMT
    The "after 6 pm" part troubles me.

    IF you are asleep by 10 or 11 pm, this might work.....but if you are awake until midnight, 1 or 2 am, perhaps not icon_question.gif
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    Jun 07, 2013 7:50 PM GMT
    cantbebotheredtoanswer.gif
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    Jun 08, 2013 5:19 PM GMT
    Who knows really? Maybe it would be sensible to LIMIT your carbs later on in the evening, but eliminate them? Nah, sounds like too much.