Nutrition Plan

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 06, 2013 2:45 AM GMT
    Hello to anyone who reads this! I am currently trying to bulk up. I have put together a plan and currently know how many grams/calories of carbs, proteins, and fats that i need per day. But i am at a loss as how to put food to this schedule. Could anyone please educate me on how to transfer this info to real food? Any info would be greatly appreciated thanks icon_smile.gif Please message me if you can help. I will probably have more questions as well, so be ready :-)
    thanks!
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    Jun 06, 2013 2:57 AM GMT
    I take a more practical approach to nutrition. Unless you're competing in bodybuilding or unless you have specific nutritional requirements due to health issues, it's a waste of time to measure your food and count your macros and micros and stuff. Just eat. Make sure each of your meals contains a protein (grilled chicken), a starch (rice or yams or whatever), and fiber (veggies). And throw in some good fats (peanut butter).

    Prep your meals for the week on Sunday. Grill all your chicken breasts, prep your veggies and starches. Put them into individual containers. Put them in the fridge. There ya go. icon_biggrin.gif

    vC6JvsY.jpg
  • pelotudo87

    Posts: 225

    Jun 06, 2013 4:31 AM GMT
    You could use a program like fitday.com, which already has the nutritional value of foods in it, so that all you would have to do is add food items and then adjust the portion sizes to reach your daily macros.

    That's what I've done in the past, lol
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 06, 2013 5:16 AM GMT
    Fast food in the morning. Fast food for brunch. Fast food for lunch. Fast food for "linner" (between lunch and dinner). Fast food for dinner. Sugary mixed drinks for the midnight snack.
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    Jun 06, 2013 2:06 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidFast food in the morning. Fast food for brunch. Fast food for lunch. Fast food for "linner" (between lunch and dinner). Fast food for dinner. Sugary mixed drinks for the midnight snack.


    Hello, Type II diabetes, metabolic syndrome and terrible blood lipid values.
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    Jun 06, 2013 4:15 PM GMT
    xrichx saidI take a more practical approach to nutrition. Unless you're competing in bodybuilding or unless you have specific nutritional requirements due to health issues, it's a waste of time to measure your food and count your macros and micros and stuff. Just eat. Make sure each of your meals contains a protein (grilled chicken), a starch (rice or yams or whatever), and fiber (veggies). And throw in some good fats (peanut butter).

    Prep your meals for the week on Sunday. Grill all your chicken breasts, prep your veggies and starches. Put them into individual containers. Put them in the fridge. There ya go. icon_biggrin.gif

    vC6JvsY.jpg


    the only reason i would count everything is so i can learn more about food/nutrition. icon_smile.gif i know very little right now, but would love to learn!
  • waynerd

    Posts: 32

    Jun 06, 2013 4:21 PM GMT
    xrichx saidI take a more practical approach to nutrition. Unless you're competing in bodybuilding or unless you have specific nutritional requirements due to health issues, it's a waste of time to measure your food and count your macros and micros and stuff. Just eat. Make sure each of your meals contains a protein (grilled chicken), a starch (rice or yams or whatever), and fiber (veggies). And throw in some good fats (peanut butter).

    Prep your meals for the week on Sunday. Grill all your chicken breasts, prep your veggies and starches. Put them into individual containers. Put them in the fridge. There ya go. icon_biggrin.gif

    vC6JvsY.jpg


    This looks so organized! I love it!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 06, 2013 4:21 PM GMT
    On http://nutritiondata.self.com you can punch in any food or meal plan and it will tell you what you are getting out of it in great nutritional detail.
  • MikeW

    Posts: 6061

    Jun 06, 2013 4:28 PM GMT
    Carbs and fats are kind of complicated. There are different kinds and they're not all good.

    But for gaining muscle weight protein is what you want to make sure you're getting enough of. Excluding protein from whey or casein supplements (recommended as small meal replacements), here's a good list:

    -------
    An ounce of meat or fish has approximately 7 grams of protein if cooked, and about 6 grams if raw.

    Beef

    • Hamburger patty, 4 oz – 28 grams protein
    • Steak, 6 oz – 42 grams
    • Most cuts of beef – 7 grams of protein per ounce

    Chicken
    • Chicken breast, 3.5 oz - 30 grams protein
    • Chicken thigh – 10 grams (for average size)
    • Drumstick – 11 grams
    • Wing – 6 grams
    • Chicken meat, cooked, 4 oz – 35 grams

    Fish
    • Most fish fillets or steaks are about 22 grams of protein for 3 ½ oz (100 grams) of cooked fish, or 6 grams per ounce
    • Tuna, 6 oz can - 40 grams of protein

    Pork
    • Pork chop, average - 22 grams protein
    • Pork loin or tenderloin, 4 oz – 29 grams
    • Ham, 3 oz serving – 19 grams
    • Ground pork, 1 oz raw – 5 grams; 3 oz cooked – 22 grams
    • Bacon, 1 slice – 3 grams
    • Canadian-style bacon (back bacon), slice – 5 – 6 grams

    Eggs and Dairy
    • Egg, large - 6 grams protein
    • Milk, 1 cup - 8 grams
    • Cottage cheese, ½ cup - 15 grams
    • Yogurt, 1 cup – usually 8-12 grams, check label
    • Soft cheeses (Mozzarella, Brie, Camembert) – 6 grams per oz
    • Medium cheeses (Cheddar, Swiss) – 7 or 8 grams per oz
    • Hard cheeses (Parmesan) – 10 grams per oz

    Beans (including soy)
    • Tofu, ½ cup 20 grams protein
    • Tofu, 1 oz, 2.3 grams
    • Soy milk, 1 cup - 6 -10 grams
    • Most beans (black, pinto, lentils, etc) about 7-10 grams protein per half cup of cooked beans
    • Soy beans, ½ cup cooked – 14 grams protein
    • Split peas, ½ cup cooked – 8 grams

    Nuts and Seeds
    • Peanut butter, 2 Tablespoons - 8 grams protein
    • Almonds, ¼ cup – 8 grams
    • Peanuts, ¼ cup – 9 grams
    • Cashews, ¼ cup – 5 grams
    • Pecans, ¼ cup – 2.5 grams
    • Sunflower seeds, ¼ cup – 6 grams
    • Pumpkin seeds, ¼ cup – 8 grams
    • Flax seeds – ¼ cup – 8 grams
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 06, 2013 4:40 PM GMT
    ^^ Great list of proteins from Mike.

    Since you have a plan and a daily calorie "budget" I would suggest taking a step back and remind yourself of the big picture. Nutrition is not about one day, it's about the longer-term picture.

    Some days (hell, maybe most days) you'll be over or under on a macro. It's not a huge deal in and of itself. Some days, you'll deviate and eat a cheeseburger with fries and shake. No big deal. It's only one meal.

    Keep focused on meeting your macros & goals on a longer-term basis and you'll be fine.

    One final thought - as you structure your plan, emphasize protein intake in the day(s) following your weight work.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 06, 2013 5:36 PM GMT
    So should I just scrap my plan and start from scratch? Im very confused when it comes to this stuff, but I would really like to learn.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 06, 2013 5:46 PM GMT
    Nah, better to do what works for you - there are apps & sites out there to help you quantify macros and nutrition info in various food choices (MyFitnessPal for one, and a few others have been mentioned in this thread).

    You'll get a lot of advice in these threads and on the internet - I suggest you play around with various ideas and figure out for yourself the means and methods that help you start reaching your goals.

    I personally track my daily macros and plan to do so until I feel I've "got it" when it comes to making smart choices on an ongoing basis. That won't work for everybody though. Everybody is a little different as to what works for them.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 06, 2013 5:48 PM GMT
    Tenebrism saidNah, better to do what works for you - there are apps & sites out there to help you quantify macros and nutrition info in various food choices (MyFitnessPal for one, and a few others have been mentioned in this thread).

    You'll get a lot of advice in these threads and on the internet - I suggest you play around with various ideas and figure out for yourself the means and methods that help you start reaching your goals.

    I personally track my daily macros and plan to do so until I feel I've "got it" when it comes to making smart choices on an ongoing basis. That won't work for everybody though. Everybody is a little different as to what works for them.


    +1. I use fitday rather than myfitnesspal - but only because I'm used to it, I think the latter is probably better. I tracked for several months, but don't bother to do it much any more after I got a feel for things.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 06, 2013 6:12 PM GMT
    Thanks so much guys!