Noisemakers on brake pads for electric vehicles.

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    Jun 07, 2013 2:15 AM GMT
    They should be sold with them stock. The pads can be checked multiple ways besides grinding and with use of prongs/flaps that are rigid enough to pop between holes or furrows, like a card on the spokes of a bike, we can have safer walkways for the ADHD pedestrians.
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    Jun 07, 2013 6:15 AM GMT
    Nonsense. The people who use brakes are not the problem.
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    Jun 07, 2013 12:14 PM GMT
    Conventional cars don't make much noise when braking, either. In fact, brakes are designed to be virtually silent. For one thing the combined noise of many cars making the sound that the OP proposes would be like a swarm of cicadas at busy intersections. And the sound inside the car would be very disconcerting.

    When a car uses its brakes its engine drops back to idle speed, most passenger cars becoming very quiet. It isn't so much the engine a pedestrian will hear as the tire noise. I'd rather vehicles were more quiet as they drive past me, especially trucks and buses that I find annoying and even deafening.
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    Jun 07, 2013 1:45 PM GMT
    windchimes would be a lot more pretty sounding, you can stick em in your window or on a mirror
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    Jun 07, 2013 1:53 PM GMT
    Just tootle your horn melodiously.
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    Jun 07, 2013 1:56 PM GMT
    Maybe if I pretend I'm def I can get a grant for a vehicle.
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    Jun 07, 2013 2:09 PM GMT
    Unintended saidThis reminds me to change the pads on my mountain bike.
    It reminds me to replace my rotors on my mountain bike. They're squeaking, and the 160mm rotors just aren't big enough to handle the pressure of being held for 2-5 minutes during a steep descent. They heat up like a bitch...need to go to 180mm.

    But on the plus side, the squeaky brakes have saved me from a few collisions with pedestrians on the trails. icon_lol.gif
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    Jun 07, 2013 2:16 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    Unintended saidThis reminds me to change the pads on my mountain bike.
    It reminds me to replace my rotors on my mountain bike. They're squeaking, and the 160mm rotors just aren't big enough to handle the pressure of being held for 2-5 minutes during a steep descent. They heat up like a bitch...need to go to 180mm.

    But on the plus side, the squeaky brakes have saved me from a few collisions with pedestrians on the trails. icon_lol.gif

    That's what your horn is for.

    traditional-squeeze-bulb-horn-trumpet-fo
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    Jun 07, 2013 2:25 PM GMT
    That's ridiculous. We finally get to the point where we can reduce noise pollution and we're not happy with it. It will just take time for people to become more aware of their surroundings. In time pedestrians will start using their eyesight over their hearing to detect oncoming traffic.
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    Jun 07, 2013 2:28 PM GMT
    I believe the safety concern is for the vision and hearing impaired-- something the 'normals' never think about. Hearing loss is increasing ever so fast, and I think we'd rather make adjustments now than deal with damages later.

    A couple of years ago I went to a talk on sound localization and traffic safety. At that point in time Nissan was considering installing output speakers on the new Nissan LEAF because there is a minimum level of noise that a car should make (NIOSH). With all the quiet cars today, there is risk of car-pedestrian accidents especially in roundabouts.Unilateral hearing loss and blindness are the real questions. Localization is computed from timing and intensity cues from two ears-- not one, but the sound at least has to be detected in any case. Then there's all the hot controversies like auditory processing disorder and neuropathy.

    Part of the ADA, the US was debating on making this feature mandatory in all electric cars in all states, but I don't think that has happened yet. Whoever designs the speaker system and decides the frequency range and intensity is gonna make a lot of money.
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    Jun 07, 2013 3:06 PM GMT
    deltalimen saidI believe the safety concern is for the vision and hearing impaired-- something the 'normals' never think about. Hearing loss is increasing ever so fast, and I think we'd rather make adjustments now than deal with damages later.

    A couple of years ago I went to a talk on sound localization and traffic safety. At that point in time Nissan was considering installing output speakers on the new Nissan LEAF because there is a minimum level of noise that a car should make (NIOSH). With all the quiet cars today, there is risk of car-pedestrian accidents especially in roundabouts.Unilateral hearing loss and blindness are the real questions. Localization is computed from timing and intensity cues from two ears-- not one, but the sound at least has to be detected in any case.

    Part of the ADA, the US was debating on making this feature mandatory in all electric cars in all states, but I don't think that has happened yet. Whoever designs the speaker system and decides the frequency range and intensity is gonna make a lot of money.


    nah, wind chimes will work just fine.
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    Jun 07, 2013 5:11 PM GMT
    deltalimen said
    At that point in time Nissan was considering...


    Which begs the question: how is this different than "...at that time Nissan was considering..." ?

    I've heard pseudo-intellectuals use that phrase ad nauseum and have never figured out how---besides verbosity--- it is different.

    Don't mean to pick on you, deltali....it just chaps my ass to hear that.
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    Jun 07, 2013 5:30 PM GMT
    StudlyScrewRite said
    deltalimen said
    At that point in time Nissan was considering...


    Which begs the question: how is this different than "...at that time Nissan was considering..." ?

    I've heard pseudo-intellectuals use that phrase ad nauseum and have never figured out how---besides verbosity--- it is different.

    Don't mean to pick on you, deltali....it just chaps my ass to hear that.


    excellent point! That's exactly why we have peer review.
  • chadwick1985

    Posts: 391

    Jun 07, 2013 11:14 PM GMT
    Seriously,cars don't need to be louder. People need to pay attention. End of story. For visually impaired people, that's what service dogs are for.
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    Jun 07, 2013 11:37 PM GMT
    almost all of the electric cars sold in the US come equipped with some sort of alert sound for visually impaired (or just clueless) pedestrians. Different models have different approaches to how or when the sound is made but the Tesla Model S is one of the few (according to Wikipedia) that doesn't come equipped with a warning sound system

    As for so-called "ADHD Pedestrians," cities (like New Orleans) need to stop waffling on the issue of right-of-way. There is huge confusion about whether cars or people have the right of way due to new ordinances passed here in NOLA. We have signalized crosswalks, half of which do not work, but also crosswalks where pedestrians are given 100% right of way but only when they are present (i.e. no pedestrians crossing means a car does not stop at all). Also, unlike other major cities, jaywalking is not ticketed unless the offending pedestrian gets struck by a car (no joke, i know this firsthand)
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    Jun 08, 2013 4:05 AM GMT
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    Jun 08, 2013 4:10 AM GMT
    LitAwake said


    Oh that's what I need.....my Prius to sound like an ice cream truck.
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    Jun 08, 2013 5:37 AM GMT
    ART_DECO said
    paulflexes said
    Unintended saidThis reminds me to change the pads on my mountain bike.
    It reminds me to replace my rotors on my mountain bike. They're squeaking, and the 160mm rotors just aren't big enough to handle the pressure of being held for 2-5 minutes during a steep descent. They heat up like a bitch...need to go to 180mm.

    But on the plus side, the squeaky brakes have saved me from a few collisions with pedestrians on the trails. icon_lol.gif

    That's what your horn is for.

    traditional-squeeze-bulb-horn-trumpet-fo
    Yeah but I don't wanna toot my own horn. I'd rather let someone else do it. icon_biggrin.gif
  • kew1

    Posts: 1595

    Jun 08, 2013 7:24 AM GMT
    LitAwake said
    deltalimen saidI believe the safety concern is for the vision and hearing impaired-- something the 'normals' never think about. Hearing loss is increasing ever so fast, and I think we'd rather make adjustments now than deal with damages later.

    A couple of years ago I went to a talk on sound localization and traffic safety. At that point in time Nissan was considering installing output speakers on the new Nissan LEAF because there is a minimum level of noise that a car should make (NIOSH). With all the quiet cars today, there is risk of car-pedestrian accidents especially in roundabouts.Unilateral hearing loss and blindness are the real questions. Localization is computed from timing and intensity cues from two ears-- not one, but the sound at least has to be detected in any case.

    Part of the ADA, the US was debating on making this feature mandatory in all electric cars in all states, but I don't think that has happened yet. Whoever designs the speaker system and decides the frequency range and intensity is gonna make a lot of money.


    nah, wind chimes will work just fine.


    I prefer the use of sleigh-bells (with the state of the roads here they'll jingle all the time).
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    Jun 08, 2013 7:31 AM GMT
    ^^ Perhaps around the Xmas holidays. The rest of the time, a playing card and clothes pin will work just fine.
  • Apparition

    Posts: 3525

    Jun 20, 2013 8:10 AM GMT
    then everyone would pay attention

    Sylvester_mcmonkey_mcbean.jpg