Vegeterian foods-Powerful for health

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    Jun 08, 2013 12:32 PM GMT
    World-renowned figures as diverse as philosophers Plato and Nietzsche, political leaders Benjamin Franklin and Gandhi, and pop icons Paul McCartney and Bob Marley have all advocated a vegetarian diet. Science is also on the side of vegetarianism. Multitudes of studies have demonstrated the remarkable health benefits of a vegetarian diet.
    “Vegetarian” is defined as avoiding all animal flesh, including fish and poultry. Vegetarians who avoid flesh, but do eat animal products such as cheese, milk, and eggs, are ovo-lacto-vegetarians (ovo = egg; lacto = milk, cheese, etc.). The ranks of those who abstain from all animal products are rapidly growing; these people are referred to as pure vegetarians or vegans. Scientific research shows that health benefits increase as the amount of food from animal sources in the diet decreases, so vegan diets are the healthiest overall.
    Preventing Cancer
    Vegetarian diets—naturally low in saturated fat, high in fiber, and replete with cancer-protective phytochemicals—help to prevent cancer. Large studies in England and Germany have shown that vegetarians are about 40 percent less likely to develop cancer compared to meat-eaters.In the United States, studies of Seventh-Day Adventists have shown significant reductions in cancer risk among those who avoided meat.Similarly, breast cancer rates are dramatically lower in nations, such as China, that follow plant-based diets.Interestingly, Japanese women who follow Western-style, meat-based diets are eight times more likely to develop breast cancer than women who follow a more traditional plant-based diet.Meat and dairy products contribute to many forms of cancer, including cancer of the colon, breast, ovaries, and prostate.
    Harvard studies that included tens of thousands of women and men have shown that regular meat consumption increases colon cancer risk by roughly 300 percent.High-fat diets also encourage the body’s production of estrogens, in particular, estradiol. Increased levels of this sex hormone have been linked to breast cancer. A recent report noted that the rate of breast cancer among premenopausal women who ate the most animal (but not vegetable) fat was one-third higher than that of women who ate the least animal fat.A separate study from Cambridge University also linked diets high in saturated fat to breast cancer.One study linked dairy products to an increased risk of ovarian cancer. The process of breaking down the lactose (milk sugar) into galactose evidently damages the ovaries. Daily meat consumption triples the risk of prostate enlargement. Regular milk consumption doubles the risk and failure to consume vegetables regularly nearly quadruples the risk.
    Vegetarians avoid the animal fat linked to cancer and get abundant fiber, vitamins, and phytochemicals that help to prevent cancer. In addition, blood analysis of vegetarians reveals a higher level of “natural killer cells,” specialized white blood cells that attack cancer cells.
    Beating Heart Disease
    Vegetarian diets also help prevent heart disease. Animal products are the main source of saturated fat and the only source of cholesterol in the diet. Vegetarians avoid these risky products. Additionally, fiber helps reduce cholesterol levels and animal products contain no fiber. When individuals switch to a high-fiber, low-fat diet their serum cholesterol levels often drop dramatically.Studies have demonstrated that a low-fat, high-fiber, vegetarian or vegan diet combined with stress reduction techniques, smoking cessation, and exercise, or combined with prudent drug intervention, could actually reverse atherosclerosis—hardening of the arteries.Heart diets that include lean meat, dairy products, and chicken are much less effective, usually only slowing the process of atherosclerosis.
    Lowering Blood Pressure
    In the early 1900s, nutritionists noted that people who ate no meat had lower blood pressure.They also discovered that vegetarian diets could, within two weeks, significantly reduce a person’s blood pressure.These results were evident regardless of the sodium levels in the vegetarian diets. People who follow vegetarian diets typically have lower blood pressure.No one knows exactly why vegetarian diets work so well, but probably cutting out meat, dairy products, and added fats reduces the blood’s viscosity (or “thickness”) which, in turn, brings down blood pressure.Plant products are generally lower in fat and sodium and have no cholesterol at all. Vegetables and fruits are also rich in potassium, which helps lower blood pressure.
    Preventing and Reversing Diabetes
    Non-insulin-dependent (adult-onset) diabetes can be better controlled and sometimes even eliminated through a low-fat, vegetarian diet along with regular exercise.Such a diet, low in fat and high in fiber and complex carbohydrates, allows insulin to work more effectively. The diabetic person can more easily regulate glucose levels. While a vegetarian diet cannot eliminate the need for insulin in people with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes, it can often reduce the amounts of insulin used. Some scientists believe that insulin-dependent diabetes may be caused by an auto-immune reaction to dairy proteins.
    Gallstones, Kidney Stones, and Osteoporosis
    Vegetarian diets have been shown to reduce one’s chances of forming kidney stones and gallstones. Diets that are high in protein, especially animal protein, tend to cause the body to excrete more calcium, oxalate, and uric acid. These three substances are the main components of urinary tract stones. British researchers have advised that persons with a tendency to form kidney stones should follow a vegetarian diet.The American Academy of Family Physicians notes that high animal protein intake is largely responsible for the high prevalence of kidney stones in the United States and other developed countries and recommends protein restriction for the prevention of recurrent kidney stones.
    Similarly, high-cholesterol, high-fat diets—the typical meat-based diet—are implicated in the formation of gallstones. The consumption of meaty diets, compared to vegetarian diets, has been shown to nearly double the risk of gallstones in women.
    For many of the same reasons, vegetarians are at a lower risk for osteoporosis. Since animal products force calcium out of the body, eating meat can promote bone loss. In nations with mainly vegetable diets (and without dairy product consumption), osteoporosis is less common than in the U.S.,even when calcium intake is also less than in the U.S.Calcium is important, but there is no need to get calcium from dairy products. For more information on protecting your bones, contact PCRM for additional reference materials or visit StrongBones.org.
    Asthma
    A 1985 Swedish study demonstrated that individuals with asthma practicing a vegan diet for a full year have a marked decrease in the need for medications and in the frequency and severity of asthma attacks. Twenty-two of the 24 subjects reported improvement by the end of the year.
    Common Concerns
    Some people still worry about whether a vegetarian diet can provide all essential nutrients. However, it is very easy to have a well-balanced diet with vegetarian foods, since these foods provide plenty of protein. Careful combining of foods is not necessary. Any normal variety of plant foods provides more than enough protein for the body’s needs. Although there is somewhat less protein in a vegetarian diet than a meat-eater’s diet, this is actually an advantage. Excess protein has been linked to kidney stones, osteoporosis, and possibly heart disease and some cancers. A diet focused on beans, whole grains, and vegetables contains adequate amounts of protein without the “overdose” most meat-eaters get.
    Calcium is easy to find in a vegetarian diet. Many dark green leafy vegetables and beans are loaded with calcium, and some orange juices, non-dairy “milks,” and cereals are calcium-fortified.
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    Jun 08, 2013 5:16 PM GMT
    Did you write all that your self or did you copy and paste it from somewhere? I would be interested in seeing the web site where you got it from if it is a copy and paste job.
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    Jun 08, 2013 6:09 PM GMT
    well ma friend it's certainly not my work.It was e-mailed to me by one of my Doctor friend.So I thought of sharing this piece of information to other members of RJ.It is from an official website www.pcrm.org.U may have a lookicon_smile.gif
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    Jun 12, 2013 2:20 AM GMT
    MrPkumar saidwell ma friend it's certainly not my work.It was e-mailed to me by one of my Doctor friend.So I thought of sharing this piece of information to other members of RJ.It is from an official website www.pcrm.org.U may have a lookicon_smile.gif


    Thanks. It is always helpful (and ethical) if you are not the author of something that you are posting that you give recognition to the author.
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    Jun 12, 2013 5:26 AM GMT
    Thank you for reading this article and visiting the official website.I do understand that the article need to be credited if it is not mine.Since the article is prepared by physicians committe for responsible medicine extracted from around 38 book references done by thousands of physicians,scientist and clinicians worldwide.It is impossible for me to credit a particular author for this resourceful information.This article is basically meant for common people to know the benefit of Vegeterian diet and is copyrighted and downloadable from its official website.I have pasted it here so that there can be open discussion with other members of RJ who are interested in Holistic Health.Any ideas you or anyone want to share regarding the article are welcome.
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    Jun 12, 2013 2:41 PM GMT
    Actually I am not a fan of a vegetarian or vegan diet. I'm more about balancing different sources for complete nutrition. Plus as a chef I am also interested in experiencing as many different kinds of food as I can. Something that a vegetarian diet would not allow me to do.
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    Jun 12, 2013 3:11 PM GMT
    What are your thoughts on working out on a vegan diet? I'm already a vegetarian and I would like to become a vegan, but I feel like I won't see any results if I do resistance training a vegan diet because vegans usually don't get enough protein for muscle growth. As it is I really don't get enough protein for muscle growth (I get about 75 grams a day which isn't enough imo) and while I'm not completely against supplementing with protein powder, I don't want to have to rely on that either. I know that it is possible for a vegan to be in great cardiovascular shape so I might just focus more on cardio if I decide to take that route.
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    Jun 12, 2013 3:45 PM GMT
    It is easy for a vegan diet to meet recommendations for protein, as long as calorie intake is adequate.Strict protein combining like protein powder is not necessary;it is more important to eat a varied diet throughout the day,so that it can provide adequate amounts of essential and non-essential amino acids.Vegans eating varied diets containing vegetables,legumes,beans,grains,nuts and seeds rarely have any difficulty getting enough protein as long as their diet contains enough energy(calories)to maintain weight.Protein supplements are not needed to achieve even the highest level of protein intake.Vegan diet not only provides good cardiovascular shape but also helps in fat-burning to stay in good shapeicon_smile.gif
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    Jun 12, 2013 4:01 PM GMT
    Why do we have canine teeth if we evolved as herbivores? Evolutionary medicine and anthropology see it a bit differently. We are omnivores. Being an omnivore in the Paleo diet tradition means a diet that is 80 percent vegetable 20 meat / fish. Its funny but on my Paleo diet I eat way more veggies than my vegetarian friends. They tend to be fat skinny from eating crappy carbs -pasta, noodles, bread , chips and man- made fake food that qualifies as vegetarian .

    Show us what a vegetarian body looks like!
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    Jun 12, 2013 8:02 PM GMT
    Alpha13 saidThey tend to be fat skinny from eating crappy carbs -pasta, noodles, bread , chips and man- made fake food that qualifies as vegetarian.


    I'm assuming that the "fat" in your sentence is a typo and that you meant to say "They tend to be skinny ...".

    1) What I read, somewhere, is that if you analyze the human teeth and digestive system that they most closely resemble the teeth and digestive systems of other animals that are herbivores, not omnivores.

    2) It sounds to me like you're saying that being muscular is the "right" body for humans to have. I also read somewhere (a running magazine I think), undoubtedly written by a self-appointed expert, that we evolved from animals that were always on their feet and doing lots of running. That being skinny was the normal body type for humans.

    The problem I have with item 1, which is similar to the problem I have with paleo and gluten free, is that humans have been eating meat, legumes, wheat, and grains for many many thousands of years. As long as you don't go overboard on any of these "bad foods" your body will do just fine; it's surprisingly adaptable.

    I think the USDA's food pyramid is generally good, although I'd probably make the milk and dairy products wedge thinner. For paleo fans, make the grains wedge smaller (or nonexistent). But always keep the meat wedge small.

    diet_042005.gif
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    Jun 12, 2013 8:09 PM GMT
    I just noticed that legumes are grouped with meats. Interesting. I wonder why, but I'm not going to worry about it and investigate. I love lentils and brown rice.
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    Jun 12, 2013 8:41 PM GMT
    Lumpynose said
    The problem I have with item 1, which is similar to the problem I have with paleo and gluten free, is that humans have been eating meat, legumes, wheat, and grains for many many thousands of years. As long as you don't go overboard on any of these "bad foods" your body will do just fine; it's surprisingly adaptable. />


    Except when it isn't. Carbs of all kinds are a surprisingly unrecognized trigger for LDL issues for many of us.
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    Jun 12, 2013 8:49 PM GMT
    No offense to anyone, but that pyramid is completely incorrect and was developed by lobbyists.

    Grains strip your gut health of important nutrients.

    Good fat is good

    Legumes wreak havoc on gut health

    Dairy has minimal overall health advantages, except for greek yoghurt, and raw milk, which can be dangerous if not watched
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    Jun 12, 2013 8:50 PM GMT
    Roguewave saidNo offense to anyone, but that pyramid is completely incorrect and was developed by lobbyists.

    Grains strip your gut health of important nutrients.

    Good fat is good

    Legumes wreak havoc on gut health

    Dairy has minimal overall health advantages, except for greek yoghurt, and raw milk, which can be dangerous if not watched


    bluey will get you for that, it apparently was developed by brilliant nutrition phds so we shouldn't question it
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    Jun 12, 2013 9:13 PM GMT
    showme said
    bluey will get you for that, it apparently was developed by brilliant nutrition phds so we shouldn't question it


    Who's Bluey? Question everything!
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    Jun 12, 2013 9:35 PM GMT
    Roguewave said
    showme said
    bluey will get you for that, it apparently was developed by brilliant nutrition phds so we shouldn't question it


    Who's Bluey? Question everything!


    A recently degreed nutritionist from Austin who doesn't think anyone else can have any valid ideas about nutrition, always good for a little flame war. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jun 12, 2013 9:37 PM GMT
    showme said
    Roguewave said
    showme said
    bluey will get you for that, it apparently was developed by brilliant nutrition phds so we shouldn't question it


    Who's Bluey? Question everything!


    A recently degreed nutritionist from Austin who doesn't think anyone else can have any valid ideas about nutrition, always good for a little flame war. icon_biggrin.gif


    Oh fuqya, he's on block after aiming at me about Crossfit!
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    Jun 12, 2013 9:40 PM GMT
    [quote][cite]Lumpynose said[/cite]
    Alpha13 saidThey tend to be fat skinny from eating crappy carbs -pasta, noodles, bread , chips and man- made fake food that qualifies as vegetarian.


    I'm assuming that the "fat" in your sentence is a typo and that you meant to say "They tend to be skinny ...".

    1) What I read, somewhere, is that if you analyze the human teeth and digestive system that they most closely resemble the teeth and digestive systems of other animals that are herbivores, not omnivores.

    2) It sounds to me like you're saying that being muscular is the "right" body for humans to have. I also read somewhere (a running magazine I think), undoubtedly written by a self-appointed expert, that we evolved from animals that were always on their feet and doing lots of running. That being skinny was the normal body type for humans.

    The problem I have with item 1, which is similar to the problem I have with paleo and gluten free, is that humans have been eating meat, legumes, wheat, and grains for many many thousands of years. As long as you don't go overboard on any of these "bad foods" your body will do just fine; it's surprisingly adaptable.

    I think the USDA's food pyramid is generally good, although I'd probably make the milk and dairy products wedge thinner. For paleo fans, make the grains wedge smaller (or nonexistent). But always keep the meat wedge small.

    The Food pyramid is dead wrong . It's adoption parallels obesity and the diabetes epidemic in the US.
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    Jun 12, 2013 9:51 PM GMT
    [quote][cite]Lumpynose said[/cite]
    Alpha13 saidThey tend to be fat skinny from eating crappy carbs -pasta, noodles, bread , chips and man- made fake food that qualifies as vegetarian.


    I'm assuming that the "fat" in your sentence is a typo and that you meant to say "They tend to be skinny ..."


    No I mean whacked out body composition. High body fat to muscle composition. Fat-skinny kids today on their sugar ( soft drinks ) , bread , cereal , pasta, chips, low fat diets ( vegetarian /food pyramid diets. ) I know one guy's son (who lived on coco puffs, mac and cheese and diet Pepsi ) requires an insulin pump at 23.



  • The_Guruburu

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    Jun 13, 2013 2:24 AM GMT
    Alpha13 saidWhy do we have canine teeth if we evolved as herbivores? Evolutionary medicine and anthropology see it a bit differently. We are omnivores. Being an omnivore in the Paleo diet tradition means a diet that is 80 percent vegetable 20 meat / fish. Its funny but on my Paleo diet I eat way more veggies than my vegetarian friends. They tend to be fat skinny from eating crappy carbs -pasta, noodles, bread , chips and man- made fake food that qualifies as vegetarian .

    Show us what a vegetarian body looks like!


    Here ya go: 

    02.jpg
    Edward Goins

    04.jpg
    Derek Tresize

    06.jpg
    Ed Bauer

    Courtesy of http://www.veganbodybuilding.com/
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    Jun 13, 2013 9:06 AM GMT
    Human canine teeth are very undeveloped. They cannot be used to tear flesh or kill a prey as it is done by a tiger or lion.
    These teeth are remnants of evolution, just as we also have a tail bone, we cannot say we have a tail and use the tail bone as tail as done by monkey.
    Canine teeth in humans is only meant for tearing vegetarian fibres like sugarcane skin or orange peel.It is no way a meat eating tool.
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    Jun 13, 2013 10:05 AM GMT
    @MrPkumar

    hey!
    Thanks for starting this thread, for some time I was considering to start a thread something like this.

    Many people came to an opinion that non-vegetarian diet is better than vegetarian (I don't know on what grounds their opinions are based on)
    But to me, I changed to vegetarian more than 3.5 years ago & it's one of the best decisions I've made. Since then, day by day my health got better, I'm more active today than I was before, now I rarely get any illness, my constipation & gastric problems were long gone(things of the past). Even catching common cold is a rare occasion to me (before turning into vegetarian, I used to get atleast 5 times a year).
    It is also less cruel, also less demanding of natural resources our mother earth provides.

    From my experience to get the best from vegetarian diet
    1. Eat a rich colourful diet
    2. Eat at specific time, everyday.
    3. Avoid processed foods (includes vegetarian processed foods)
    4. Eat less oily foods.
    5. Eat homemade foods if possible.
    6. Resisting temptations.(this is the most important of all)

    BTW, I would like to know if you have any information about 'Jain diet', if yes... pls do share.
    Thank you.
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    Jun 13, 2013 3:35 PM GMT
    @ Harry7785

    Hello!

    I am glad that you are enjoying your vegetarian diet. I would love to share something about Jain diet since it only not purifies the body but purifies the soul!

    For ages Indian tradition has been accustomed to following a strict spiritually motivated vegetarian diet that includes Jains, Buddhists and Vaisnava cult.

    These vegetarian foods are called sattvic in Sanskrit, which literally means pure which is based on the qualities of pure goodness and avoids tamasic foods that includes onion, garlic and meat.

    According to Vedic wisdom, food is categorised into 3 types: tamasic, rajasic and sattvic. As the Bhagavad-Gita mentions, sattvic food is the purest of the three, creating positive vibrations that promote happiness and satisfaction. Tamasic foods are heavy, stale, dull, and lethargic which are considered to be in the mode of darkness.

    Jains strictly forbids eating meat, eggs and fish since they adhere to the principle of Ahimsa which means non-violence or non-injury. Every act by which a person directly or indirectly supports killing or injury to any living creature, either by thought, word, or deed is seen as act of violence (himsa), which creates harmful reaction karma. The aim of Ahimsa is to prevent the accumulation of such reaction and ultimately liberate themselves from the cycle of repeated birth and death.

    Jains normally follow a lacto-vegetarian diet that includes dairy products but currently it is changing to veganism due to violence committed against cows for obtaining milk.

    Jains make considerable efforts not to injure plants in everyday life as far as possible. Jains only accept such violence in as much as it is indispensable for human survival, and there are special instructions for preventing unnecessary violence against plants. Strict Jains don’t eat root vegetables such as potatoes, onions, roots and tubers, because such root vegetables are considered to be 'ananthkay'. 'Ananthkay' means one body, but containing countless lives. A regular vegetable such as cabbage has number of leaves and lives as could be counted by a layman. However, a root vegetable such as potato, though from the looks of it is one article, is said to contain multiple lives ('ekindriya') in it. Also, tiny life forms are injured when the plant is pulled up and because the bulb is seen as a living being, as it is able to sprout.

    Also, consumption of most root vegetables involves uprooting and killing the entire plant. Whereas consumption of most terrestrial vegetables doesn't kill the plant (it lives on after plucking the vegetables or it was seasonally supposed to wither away anyway).

    Mushrooms, Fungus and Yeasts are forbidden because they are parasites, grow in non-hygienic environments and may harbour other life forms. Alfalfa is the only known plantae that contains vitamin D2 source they can use or make vitamin D2 supplements from.

    Honey is forbidden, as its collection would amount to violence against the bees.

    Food items that have started to decay are prohibited.
    Traditionally cooking or eating at night was discouraged because insects are attracted to the lamps or fire at night. Strict Jains take the anastamita or anthai vow of not eating after sunset.

    Strict Jains do not consume food which has been stored overnight, as it possesses a higher concentration of micro-organisms (for example, bacteria, yeast etc.) as compared to food prepared and consumed the same day. Hence, they do not consume yogurt or dhokla & idli batter unless they've been freshly set on the same day.

    Jains do not consume fermented foods (beer, wine and other alcohols) to avoid killing of a large number of microorganisms associated with the fermenting process.

    Thanks for reading!

    References
    1.Bhagavad-Gita-As It Is p688-689
    2.Lodha, R.M.: Conservation of Vegetation and Jain Philosophy, in: Medieval Jainism: Culture and Environment, New Delhi 1990, p. 137-141; Tähtinen p. 105; Dundas p. 106.
    3.Laidlaw p. 156-157, 167-170; Sangave p. 260.
    4.Hemacandra: Yogashastra 3.37; Laidlaw p. 166-167; Tähtinen p. 109.
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    Jun 13, 2013 3:49 PM GMT
    MrPkumar saidHuman canine teeth are very undeveloped. They cannot be used to tear flesh or kill a prey as it is done by a tiger or lion.
    These teeth are remnants of evolution, just as we also have a tail bone, we cannot say we have a tail and use the tail bone as tail as done by monkey.
    Canine teeth in humans is only meant for tearing vegetarian fibres like sugarcane skin or orange peel.It is no way a meat eating tool.



    Show us how your diet has impacted your body?
  • The_Guruburu

    Posts: 895

    Jun 13, 2013 8:00 PM GMT
    Alpha13 said
    MrPkumar saidHuman canine teeth are very undeveloped. They cannot be used to tear flesh or kill a prey as it is done by a tiger or lion.
    These teeth are remnants of evolution, just as we also have a tail bone, we cannot say we have a tail and use the tail bone as tail as done by monkey.
    Canine teeth in humans is only meant for tearing vegetarian fibres like sugarcane skin or orange peel.It is no way a meat eating tool.



    Show us how your diet has impacted your body?


    Weren't satisfied by my other post of vegetarian bodybuilders, eh?