Genetics

  • Azfit1

    Posts: 4

    Jun 10, 2013 10:46 PM GMT
    What is everyone's opinion on how "Genetics" can play an important role on your fitness goals? Negative and Positive
  • NeuralShock

    Posts: 411

    Jun 10, 2013 11:08 PM GMT
    I personally think that they can play a major role.

    Some people are naturally built with a wider frame for instance. Some people have a higher metabolism, some lower (Which can be taken as positive/negative either way.). Some people have higher natural levels of testosterone floating around their body- that aren't bound to SHBG- so are avaliable to the tissues.

    I personally fall under the category of "good genetics" according to a lot of people. I was with a bigger build shoulder-wise than guys who trained for years when I first started.... and I'm gaining muscle like a weed still and can easily train my entire body in a 3 day split twice a week (6/7 days a week) for 3 hour and very intense intervals.

    Have I been accused of taking testosterone? Oddly enough yeah.... which I still am not sure how to take (Compliment? Insult? Even if you ARE on test you need to train and eat like a demon.).

    Another aspect many people don't think of is guys who "start" with a decent chest already on them.... kinda peeves me off because my chest is a little behind the rest of my body. icon_redface.gif But then again I started with great legs and ass so....

    Tl;dr: Big role.
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    Jun 10, 2013 11:10 PM GMT
    Being fat is not genetic. Being predisposed to gain weight quickly, is.

    Proper diet and exercise can combat the the second.

    Conclusion: There is no other excuse for being fat other than laziness or extenuating medical conditions that prevent exercise.

    After losing 70 lbs, I should know. icon_wink.gif
  • GWriter

    Posts: 1446

    Jun 11, 2013 12:45 AM GMT
    It's a significant factor in determining whether you can become a world-class athlete. For the vast majority of people, hard work and dedication count for much more.
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    Jun 11, 2013 12:46 AM GMT
    I want to know why "genetics" is in quotes. Is it meant ironically?
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    Jun 11, 2013 12:54 AM GMT
    It plays the single biggest role in your fitness abilities. Why wouldn't it?

    However, too many people use bad genetics as an excuse to give up. Having a predisposition for a certain body type doesn't mean that there isn't anything you can do about it. But we don't have the technology yet to test your genetics to figure out exactly how your body behaves. It's trial and error for a lot of people, and I think that's why a lot of people get frustrated and give up.
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    Jun 11, 2013 1:00 AM GMT
    Call me hateful if you want. But genetics didn't make you eat a whole box of Oreos, drink soda, or eat fast (fatty processed) food. If you don't have a condition that is messing your body up like a thyroid issue or something more, it's do to poor eating habits and lack of exercise.

    That's with weight loss. Gains, like muscle gain and toning. I would say hell yea. I can put on muscle easier and faster than a friend of mine. But he can shred and lean out a whole hell of a lot faster than I can.
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    Jun 11, 2013 1:00 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidBeing fat is not genetic. Being predisposed to gain weight quickly, is.

    Proper diet and exercise can combat the the second.

    Conclusion: There is no other excuse for being fat other than laziness or extenuating medical conditions that prevent exercise.

    After losing 70 lbs, I should know. icon_wink.gif

    I understand what you're trying to say, but I disagree with your conclusions. I think that getting fat is very natural. Think about it. If we lived in nature, we'd have periods of plentiful food supply and periods of scarce food supplied. We'd need to get fat in order to store up energy for leaner times. We crave sugary and fatty foods because our bodies want the most amount of energy for the least amount of effort.

    The problem is that in modern society, we always have plenty of food, but our bodies still operate on principals of the natural world. We have to understand that we still have these natural urges, even though they aren't really necessary anymore. We have to fight these instincts and adapt ourselves to living in a world with plenty of food and little practical reason to exercise.
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    Jun 11, 2013 1:10 AM GMT
    DudeInNOVA said
    paulflexes saidBeing fat is not genetic. Being predisposed to gain weight quickly, is.

    Proper diet and exercise can combat the the second.

    Conclusion: There is no other excuse for being fat other than laziness or extenuating medical conditions that prevent exercise.

    After losing 70 lbs, I should know. icon_wink.gif

    I understand what you're trying to say, but I disagree with your conclusions. I think that getting fat is very natural. Think about it. If we lived in nature, we'd have periods of plentiful food supply and periods of scarce food supplied. We'd need to get fat in order to store up energy for leaner times. We crave sugary and fatty foods because our bodies want the most amount of energy for the least amount of effort.

    The problem is that in modern society, we always have plenty of food, but our bodies still operate on principals of the natural world. We have to understand that we still have these natural urges, even though they aren't really necessary anymore. We have to fight these instincts and adapt ourselves to living in a world with plenty of food and little practical reason to exercise.


    You've got that right. Nature is a tricky lady. Haha look at the different foods cooked during the different seasons. Carb rich and salty during autumn and winter, less fatty and leaner eating I'm spring and summer.
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    Jun 11, 2013 1:12 AM GMT
    I think it plays a large role in how easy or difficult certain fitness goals can be achieved by a person.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jun 11, 2013 1:19 AM GMT
    what do you mean by you're "39?"
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    Jun 11, 2013 1:40 AM GMT
    It is the n.1 factor, even more important than nutrition, training and rest.

    I say this based on several friends and acquaintances who are steroid users. I have seen two guys use exactly the same steroid, same dosages, same length of cycle, go to the same dietitian and work out just as hard. One gained 24lbs. The other one... just 6lbs. In both cases I'm mentioning lean mass gains. Even steroids, which accelerate gains for everyone, have very unequal effectiveness depending on the genetics of the user.

    Thanks to genetics, if you are below average you have to do an above average effort just to achieve average results. You can't judge effort just by looking. I definitely do way less effort to keep a single digit body fat than any endomorph. I could eat oreos and every kind of crap and still I wouldn't gain as much fat as most people. On the other hand, I gain no more than 6lbs of lean mass per year and I have more trouble than most to gain and keep lean mass.

  • NeuralShock

    Posts: 411

    Jun 11, 2013 1:43 AM GMT
    bachian saidIt is the n.1 factor, even more important than nutrition, training and rest.

    I say this based on several friends and acquaintances who are steroid users. I have seen two guys use exactly the same steroid, same dosages, same length of cycle, go to the same dietitian and work out just as hard. One gained 24lbs. The other one... just 6lbs. In both cases I'm mentioning lean mass gains. Even steroids, which accelerate gains for everyone, have very unequal effectiveness depending on the genetics of the user.

    Thanks to genetics, if you are below average you have to do an above average effort just to achieve average results. You can't judge effort just by looking. I definitely do way less effort to keep a single digit body fat than any endomorph. I could eat oreos and every kind of crap and still I wouldn't gain as much fat as most people. On the other hand, I gain no more than 6lbs of lean mass per year and I have more trouble than most to gain and keep lean mass.



    24 pounds vs 6 pounds?

    I'd think that there was a lot of interference on either the testosterone receptors or transfer of DHT to test.... or too much SHBG.

    Straight up testosterone will NEVER go well for anyone, but the dramatic differences in lean mass gains makes me incredibly skeptical.
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    Jun 11, 2013 4:31 AM GMT
    It's very important. One of my friends was able to completely transform his body in 6 months w/o taking steroids or even creatine. I've known people who have been training for 5 years with a good diet and a good routine and bad genetics who still don't look like him. There are also people who are naturally muscular.
    2s1m4jr.jpg
    The guy on the left is my bro who doesn't even lift and the guy on the right his his step son who has been lifting for about 5 years. They live together so I'm guessing that they pretty much have similar diets. Genetics is a huge factor.
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    Jun 11, 2013 12:32 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidBeing fat is not genetic. Being predisposed to gain weight quickly, is.

    Proper diet and exercise can combat the the second.

    Conclusion: There is no other excuse for being fat other than laziness or extenuating medical conditions that prevent exercise.

    After losing 70 lbs, I should know. icon_wink.gif


    Kol haKavod! Congrats
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    Jun 11, 2013 12:51 PM GMT
    a great deal actually
  • tazzari

    Posts: 2929

    Jun 11, 2013 4:31 PM GMT
    I'm a three-time Olympic coach, so I've seen this from a certain perspective. In my experience the Big, Big winners are the ones with the genetics and the brains (concentration, ability to solve problems, ability to absorb technical improvements, etc.). The saddest ones tend to be the ones with great genetics and but who don't have the brains: they coast on talent and never get better past a certain points; they're often the post-high-school or college sport dropouts.

    But the consistent winners tend to be the slightly less genetically gifted. They've had to learn and analyze and be disciplined. Speaking only for US Nordic skiing, the top guys during my career (Bill Koch, Josh Thompson) tested relatively poorly, but were consistent winners because of their enormous mental focus.

    My two bits... icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jun 11, 2013 8:07 PM GMT
    tazzari saidI'm a three-time Olympic coach, so I've seen this from a certain perspective. In my experience the Big, Big winners are the ones with the genetics and the brains (concentration, ability to solve problems, ability to absorb technical improvements, etc.). The saddest ones tend to be the ones with great genetics and but who don't have the brains: they coast on talent and never get better past a certain points; they're often the post-high-school or college sport dropouts.

    But the consistent winners tend to be the slightly less genetically gifted. They've had to learn and analyze and be disciplined. Speaking only for US Nordic skiing, the top guys during my career (Bill Koch, Josh Thompson) tested relatively poorly, but were consistent winners because of their enormous mental focus.

    My two bits... icon_biggrin.gif


    And then there's the question of how much of our mental makeup is from genetics versus environment/learned.
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    Jun 11, 2013 8:48 PM GMT
    Genetics DOES play into things.

    My Grandfather died of a massive heart attack at age 56, MY dad had one at age 43 and died 2 years ago at age 74. Exactly 4 weeks ago..I was rushed from work to the hospital with one---almost didn't make it. I worked out religiously for over 15 years and led a relatively healthy lifestyle...Guess you never know.Now my workout consists of a few laps --walking--around the local stadium track...not ready for stairs yet.
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    Jun 11, 2013 9:12 PM GMT
    Well.. Some gain muscles quicker than others, others don't. ;p But it's important to gain as much muscle your genetics allow! icon_smile.gif That's what counts!
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    Jun 12, 2013 5:07 AM GMT
    I hate how no matter how much I work out my shoulders, my frame is still so narrow.