To the Realjockers with Careers

  • HopefulMuscle

    Posts: 434

    Jun 11, 2013 11:01 PM GMT
    What worked for you guys that helped stand you out from the rest of the applicants and successfully landed the career you wanted? Been trying to find one myself (in the information technology field). I am being serious about this so I would really appreciate helpful advice. Thank you!
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    Jun 12, 2013 1:38 AM GMT
    you don't 'land' a career, you build it...icon_wink.gif
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    Jun 12, 2013 1:44 AM GMT
    Solid education would help. Amazing recommendations. Professional attitude. Well kept appearance. An irresistible smile.

    Fake it til you make it!
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    Jun 12, 2013 1:58 AM GMT
    Mac1986 saidSolid education would help. Amazing recommendations. Professional attitude. Well kept appearance. An irresistible smile.

    Fake it til you make it!


    This is my life...and I have built a nice career for myself.
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    Jun 12, 2013 2:01 AM GMT
    Documented track record.....I.e. Salesperson of the year, 2012. I interview individuals quite often, and a track record and adaptability is high on my list... good luck!
  • Shenyu

    Posts: 47

    Jun 12, 2013 2:05 AM GMT
    - research on the organisation and the position you about to apply.
    - study yourself ie what you are really good at and how you intend to apply it for the respective organisation
    - be succint, clear and confident on your application letter.
    - vision yourself getting the job and what would you be in the future...

    Hope these help
  • waccamatt

    Posts: 1918

    Jun 12, 2013 2:13 AM GMT
    Perseverance and changing with the times. Also having topnotch technical skills helps if you want an office job.
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    Jun 12, 2013 2:16 AM GMT
    Network. The last 3 jobs I've had were all referrals from friends and past co-workers.

    In this day and age where everyone has an "IT" degree, it's all about who you know and not necessarily what you know.
  • BryUSC88

    Posts: 198

    Jun 12, 2013 2:20 AM GMT
    Luck certainly helps. I got in the IT field about 15 years ago with some knowledge of IT, but zero experience. I just happened to be in the right place at the right time, and got a job where they trained me. I still look back on that day and am SOOO thankful things happened the way they did. I was in banking at the time making very little money, and working long hours. Then I got lucky with one interview, and haven't looked back. Now if only my love life would be so lucky!
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    Jun 12, 2013 2:21 AM GMT
    Mac1986 saidSolid education would help. Amazing recommendations. Professional attitude. Well kept appearance. An irresistible smile.

    Fake it til you make it!


    This is pretty much on point. As far as getting the job, make sure that your resume/application mirrors the requirements of the job (if it is posted). It makes a big difference if you tailor your resume to a particular employer. I have seen many resumes when I interview people for legal jobs and I can easily see the ones who just photocopied their generic resume and mailed it to everyone.

    Second, if you get an interview, prepare for it. In addition to your physical appearance, make sure you know something about the company. Once again, we may interview 12 people for a position and only 2 people actually took the time to really learn about the job and the company. You will be remembered if you can clearly explain why you want to work at that particular employer.

    It does not hurt someone if someone at the company you want to work at can recommend you.

    Once you have the job, work hard, keep on top of your professional credentials and be willing to do whatever is asked to get ahead. Your competence and work ethic will determine your career progression once you get here. In any event, good luck.
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    Jun 12, 2013 2:24 AM GMT
    hairyandym saidyou don't 'land' a career, you build it...icon_wink.gif


    This. Vision + Education + Hard work = Career
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    Jun 12, 2013 2:24 AM GMT
    * Be open to network and freelance, temp jobs if necessary in the field - this will open up contacts, opportunities, and attend conferences. Show your business card, if you are NOT working make one for yourself and hit every booth.

    * Be friendly and courteous to all, and helpful throughout your career, do not step over others in your career-people always remember the bad apples.

    *Be open to take chances, even if you do not think is benefiting your career, it will always come back to open another opportunity.

    *Know your field, always be a step of others of what is occurring, what is the next, learn the 'new' application or 'software'in your field - will make you more marketable.

    *Jump every three to four years to a new opportunity - you are loyal to your brand, not a company or its product - unfortunately we are now disposable. Therefore, you are your own brand, the more you know, the better you will be. Create value of yourself.

    *Create a profile in Linkein, network, post in forums, etc.
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    Jun 12, 2013 2:32 AM GMT
    For the IT field a degree is pretty much required these days.

    If you're recently or soon to be graduating from college and you need experience, try finding volunteer positions with non-profits where you can mentor under someone who knows their stuff.

    If you want to be a programmer, there are many open source projects you could join. Go with a language that's widely used. http://goo.gl/DMs2 (I'm puzzled as to why C is so high; maybe it's used by embedded stuff and/or military stuff?)
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    Jun 12, 2013 2:34 AM GMT
    TheGuyNextDoor said
    hairyandym saidyou don't 'land' a career, you build it...icon_wink.gif

    Listen to what this guy just said. Sooo many younger guys and girls think you can walk in, day one, and get that corner office.
    He's very right, you have to build your career from the bottom rung up to the top. Sometimes along the way, you may even have to go back down a few rungs, but if you work at it, you can climb just as high or higher one day.


    I concur. Been in the same field since I graduated from college. Started out making $14K, and worked hard to get where I am today. Been a few hiccups, but if you hang in and work your ass off, people notice.
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    Jun 12, 2013 3:16 AM GMT
    You really do build a career. You don't have to be perfect, but you must be willing to admit you don't know as much as you think you know and therefore never stop learning new things. You must have the eagerness to learn new things.

    I was given an opportunity that I felt I didn't have the experience for. I'm not the smartest guy, and I'm pretty useless in a lab (I'm actually really good, but I'm a social butterfly who likes the sun), and I thought I'd be fired within a month when they realized they hired the wrong guy to lead million dollar projects.
    I've done pretty well for myself as an engineer and project manager. I've discovered I'm logical and decisive; technical enough to lead design discussions; and patient enough to mediate two opposing parties to resolutions.

    Over the last 5 years, I've developed my role by building connections with people by being reliable and stepping up to the plate when no one else would. I take pride in my work and admit my failures where there due.
  • ThatSwimmerGu...

    Posts: 3755

    Jun 12, 2013 3:25 AM GMT
    Apply for internships! Network with people! LinkedIn
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    Jun 12, 2013 3:29 AM GMT
    I think presenting yourself well, being able to think structurally, logically, and quickly; as well as showing the ability to articulate yourself professionally and succinctly will lead to a great interview. Also, smile.
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    Jun 12, 2013 3:31 AM GMT
    hairyandym saidyou don't 'land' a career, you build it...icon_wink.gif




    Well said!
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    Jun 12, 2013 3:41 AM GMT
    luckily I've known I've wanted to work with the corporate/engineering of railway/transit development since I was a kid. I have yet to find someone my age who knows as much about trains, their history and their future like I do, which sucks for 2 reasons. I love learning new things, I wish I had peers in my field and its a little awkward being young enough to be everyone's son and grandson in the department lol.

    Make sure you have a goal and please make sure you're PROPERLY educated. Some of the resume's that come across my desk for internships are very poor in the grammatical and formatting sector and what's disturbing is, you can tell these kids actually TOOK time composing it. Once you have that in place...grow from there.
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    Jun 12, 2013 3:42 AM GMT
    TheGuyNextDoor said
    hairyandym saidyou don't 'land' a career, you build it...icon_wink.gif

    Listen to what this guy just said. Sooo many younger guys and girls think you can walk in, day one, and get that corner office.
    He's right, you have to build your career from the bottom rung up to the top. Sometimes along the way, you may even have to go back down a few rungs, but if you work at it, you can climb just as high or higher one day.

    I couldn't have said it better. I started at the lowest position and just celebrated my 30th anniversary. I worked hard, kept myself looking good, personable and learned what was going on around me. I was promoted because of my reputation, knowledge and work ethic. I'd say I'm probably in the top 15% of the pay scale in the company now. I'm not making a mint but I've done pretty well and it's because I was modest and worked hard. My yearly salary when I stared was $10,645 a year. Yikes!
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    Jun 12, 2013 3:55 AM GMT
    Good grades gave me the shot I think, since I had zero experience going in, and I seemed to know what I was talking about in the interview.
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    Jun 12, 2013 4:23 AM GMT
    Finding a good job is like finding a boy friend, expect to get rejected and/or have it not work out 90-95% of the time. Just keep fucking trying. It's like fishing. Most likely you will dislike over half of what you do at your first job (my current situation), but if you find a niche where you can apply your particular talents and are an amiable person people will see the unique characteristics you can bring to an organization. Slowly but surely your future jobs will allow you to capitalize on your strengths and, hopefully, make more money.

    So for your first job, don't be a perfectionist, just take something and start working. Eventually you will end up where you belong (unless of course you have a specialized degree like engineering or nursing, in which case a golden road to your career path is laid down before you *growls*).
  • Greygull

    Posts: 282

    Jun 12, 2013 4:49 AM GMT
    I'm a pastry chef,I'm twenty five. I went to school for it and I've been building a career since I was fourteen. You're gonna have to take a job with crap pay and shitty tasks to move up. You can't expect even with a degree to come out swinging.

    It's been five years and I've just now made it into a very solid position. and That took alot of work, networking and being just plain tenacious. Fight for what you want and be a hard ass and work harder than everyone else. it may seem pointless but you develop skills and discipline, and people do notice.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jun 12, 2013 5:03 AM GMT
    i slept with the boss
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    Jun 12, 2013 5:24 AM GMT
    For the interview:

    Assume you have 10 minutes to say why you are interested in the position and why you would succeed with it. In 10 minutes you should be able to tell a story with key themes and specific examples of their application. Memorize this (not word for word) but well enough that you hit every key point every time.

    You'll never actually get that 10 minutes. But you'll be amazed how confidently you can draw on examples and find your words when the hard questions come out during the interview.

    My interviews started turning around after I did this exercise.