Why can't I drop the weight???

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 01, 2008 7:39 AM GMT
    If this topic was posted before, sorry. I am fairly new to this site so I am unsure what has been discussed.

    I am 50 years (young -- I have recently been told I look about 35!icon_biggrin.gif)

    I am 6'3" and weight 220-224 lbs. I do at least one hour of cardio six days a week and light weights 30 min. 5 times a week. I try hard to eat healthy, drink lots of water, no alcohol or soft drinks. (I do like my coffee -- maybe 2-3 cups a day in the morning).

    I have been "dieting" for almost a year and have dropped 20 lbs but I still have excess fat in my mid-section. I have dropped my waist from a 42 down to a 38 (my goal is around 36"). Nothing I try will get me past this plateau (which I have been at since March). HELP! What am I doing wrong? My goal is to reach about 190-200 lbs. and I am getting discouraged that I am having such slow results.

    Does anyone think maybe this is a medical issue and I should talk to my doctor to find out what might be hindering my progress?

    Thanks for ALL of the suggestions!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 01, 2008 12:15 PM GMT
    I thought I'd save Caslon some time, he'll post these two books as recommendations

    http://www.amazon.com/You-Owners-Manual-Waist-Management/dp/0743292545

    http://www.amazon.com/You-Staying-Owners-Extending-Warranty/dp/0743292561/ref=pd_sim_b_4
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 01, 2008 1:13 PM GMT
    My experience was similar to yours, and the difference for me was the nutrition that made the difference. I was working out a lot over the past year of so, but I've dropped a lot of weight (thought the challenge here) just by doing portion control and watching what I eat.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 01, 2008 1:20 PM GMT
    I'd agree with Matt there, nutrition is unfortunately the key.

    What I might suggest though, and at least it would give you a break from that cardio, is that you switch over to an interval training system. The problem with just doing cardio is that it burns calories while you work out, which is great, but what happens during the other 23 hours of the day? Some people find that it can help to do a harder, shorter routine, which doesn't burn as many calories during the workout but increases the calorie burn during the rest of the day, so overall you burn more calories.

    I've seen people get some good results with Eat Stop Eat, not tried it myself, but it seems to make sense to my own experience.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 01, 2008 1:26 PM GMT
    I think you need to be honest with yourself. What are you eating every day? Are you snacking? Those calories are coming from somewhere. How big are your portions? Are you measuring out your food and weighing it? This is what you need to do if you are serious about losing the weight.

    We actually need a lot less food than we think we do.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 01, 2008 1:35 PM GMT
    I agree with Matt about this... it has to do with calories. When the body gets to about 15 or 20 pounds lost from your original weight, it starts to notice that something is different and it has to adjust to the weight loss. This happened to me with the weight loss challenge (like Matt) that I am on. My coach said this happens a lot. The way the coach suggested to me was to reduce calories for awhile and force the body to continue to drop weight. I went from 1500 calories a day to 1400. This was the kick my body needed to continue dropping...

    Hope that helps! All the other suggestions are great too! Watch snacks, calories and kick up the calorie burning too!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 01, 2008 2:24 PM GMT
    Thanks for the suggestions. I appreciate them.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 01, 2008 3:02 PM GMT
    1) Be patient; weight loss takes time.

    2) Loss is fastest in the beginning, then slows. But it should continue. If it's not continuing to drop even at a slower rate then you're still eating too many calories.

    3) Remember: This is basic physics. Chemical energy in (food) stored chemically (adds mass) in your body. If there's an energy deficit then your body will tap its stores. If you're eating enough that your body doesn't need to tap its stored deposits, then you won't lose weight.

    Simply put, you're still eating too much. It sucks, I know.. but it's the truth. While I won't go into specifics, plenty of overweight people have been in internment camps and military prisons throughout history and none remained overweight for long. You certainly don't want to lose weight that fast, but just remember there are laws of physics here and the loss will happen if caloric restriction. Period. Just don't lose too much too fast else you'll lose muscle tissue as well and could furthermore damage organs.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 01, 2008 3:06 PM GMT
    americanjustin said1) Be patient; weight loss takes time.

    2) Loss is fastest in the beginning, then slows. But it should continue. If it's not continuing to drop even at a slower rate then you're still eating too many calories.

    3) Remember: This is basic physics. Chemical energy in (food) stored chemically (adds mass) in your body. If there's an energy deficit then your body will tap its stores. If you're eating enough that your body doesn't need to tap its stored deposits, then you won't lose weight.

    Simply put, you're still eating too much. It sucks, I know.. but it's the truth. While I won't go into specifics, plenty of overweight people have been in internment camps and military prisons throughout history and none remained overweight for long. You certainly don't want to lose weight that fast, but just remember there are laws of physics here and the loss will happen if caloric restriction. Period. Just don't lose too much too fast else you'll lose muscle tissue as well and could furthermore damage organs.




    stop giving physicists credit for everything...chemists are genius too...hahahahahaha...just fooling around

    actually it is related to chemistry...but that is neither here nor there
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 01, 2008 3:28 PM GMT
    It took me years to come to terms with this, but.....

    Sometimes its not how much you're eating, but when you're eating....

    Skipping meals, especially breakfast is a no-no.....your body needs food to build muscle and burn fat......if it doesn't get enough fuel, it will burn muscle and store fat....

    Try eating 5 SMALL meals a day....about every 3 hours....a portion should never be larger than your fist...try to avoid carbs in the evenings....I avoid any carbs after 6:00 p.m.....and make my first meal of the day a balance of carbs and protein...

    Oh, and don't diet. Change your eating habits instead.

    Good luck! It can be done!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 01, 2008 4:49 PM GMT
    As someone in the same boat (naturally easy gainer, muscle and fat, periodically need to lose weight), I use the general rule that if I've plateau'd for more than 10 days when losing, I need to kick it up on both the diet and exercise fronts, and I'll just share what has worked for me. Maybe it will for you.

    Diet: Ratcheting down my daily calories by the same percentage as my recent loss has usually worked for me, to offset the lowered metabolic need from a lighter body. In other words, if I went from 240 to 220 eating 2000 calories a day, a drop of 20 pounds or 8% of my original weight and have plateau'd, then I cut back my daily calories by 8% or so (150-200 calories). It only makes sense that as you lose weight and are carrying around a lighter, maybe even a significantly lighter body, you are going to need fewer calories, especially as you try to lose more body fat, than you did initially. One way to make this easier is to implement the suggestion here that you spread those fewer calories out around the day.

    Exercise: Like you, during a weight loss period, I do a lot of regular cardio, usually an extra hour daily, on top of my regular 8-mile roundtrip commute on my bike, plus the other 30-60 miles I ride for fun. But I find that the same long, slow sessions over time stop working, so, after a week of plateau, it's time for "intervals." If my usual elliptical session is an hour at level ten, I cut back to 30 minutes and after a five minute warm-up, I then shoot the intensity up to 14 or 15 for a minute, then recover for 2 minutes, then again and again, for the rest of the time. Likewise, on my bike, I have a great 4-mile loop on the trail, I kick up the mph to 18-20 for the 2 miles out, then take my time coming back the return 2 miles, and I do that 5 times. Not only do intervals get you into better cardio shape faster, but they usually shake loose the weight loss plateau by interrupting my body's adaptation to the same old pattern.

    Finally, when I'm losing, I'm pretty focused on keeping the progress moving forward. If I seem to stall for more than 7-10 days, then I need to change it up somehow till I meet my goal. I wouldn't wait months, because then it's a bit like starting all over. I just find it easier to stay in the mindset and stay on top of it.
  • vj2004t

    Posts: 203

    Nov 01, 2008 4:56 PM GMT
    I first started at the Dr. office and checked if it was a medical problem and had him to run several tests come to find out I was retaining water she gave a prescription pill so get rid of the water weight. You could have a sluggish thyroid check it out.

    Second I started the RJ diet program and started a good nutrition program. I was killing my self and starving not getting enough food. I just got back from the Dr. yesterday and I have lost 7 pounds. My nutritionist also cut me back on the amount of time I spend at the gym growth is better and I am dropping weight. Best of luck.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 01, 2008 4:59 PM GMT
    Not that exercising does not play a key role in weight however it is ALL about Nutrition and everyone's body reacts differently to food! I know for me eliminating a MAJORITY of carbs and sugar has helped A LOT! However that may not be the case for you; depends on your body type and other physical aspects. It's not easy, nor is it always fun, however be patient and it'll "click"!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 01, 2008 6:05 PM GMT
    vj2004t said...she gave a prescription pill so get rid of the water weight. You could have a sluggish thyroid check it out.


    If your bod is retaining water it's usually for a good reason: like to achieve equilibrium after increased sodium intake.

    IMPORTANT: Thyroid problems, from what I can recall back when I worked at the clinic, were responsible for less than 1% of overweight cases, and most of those were women. Statistically males had a better chance of dying in car accident than attributing their weight to thyroid dysfunction.

    It's almost always attributed to a combination of one or more of the following:

    1) Eating too many calories.

    2) Eating one or two large meals per day (FYI: this is prescribed clinical treatment for helping persons in dire need of *gaining* weight).

    3) Sedentary lifestyle (not enough walking, stairs, sitting for too long, not taking frequent 'get up' breaks when office working, etc.) promoting listlessness.

    4) Clinical depression that contributed to items 1, 2, and 3, above.

    5) High intake of sugars, refined flours, and other high-glycemic foods that promote insulin release.


    Hope that helps.
    --Justin
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Nov 02, 2008 10:55 AM GMT
    I am 6'3" and weight 220-224 lbs. I do at least one hour of cardio six days a week and light weights 30 min. 5 times a week. I try hard to eat healthy, drink lots of water, no alcohol or soft drinks.


    There's your problem right there....

    You want to lose weight? It's a simple math problem
    Calories in have to be less than the Calories burned
    Your body has gotten used to the cardio you're doing and you're at a plateau
    You want to drop some more lbs you're going to have to up the ante
    The easiest way to do it is to throw some heavier weights into the picture
    start some weight routines three days a week and the extra work will pay off
    also eating "Healthy" is code for I eat what I want but stay away from crap
    You're going to have to watch the food a little more
    Less fats
    Less prepared foods