More Doctors No Longer Accepting Insurance

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 15, 2013 2:56 PM GMT
    This is exactly what I was talking about a few weeks ago here when we found out our company is dumping our employer-sponsored health insurance because of the Affordable Care Act.

    My doctor also accepts very few insurance plans so because of the Affordable Care Act I will not only have to change my insurance company but also change my doctor - two things which I heard the president say over and over and over again would not happen.


    Doctors dump health insurance plans, charge patients less
    UPI 6/15/2013 3:56:04 AM
    WICHITA, Kan., June 14 (UPI) --
    A Kansas physician says he makes the same income and offers better quality care to his patients after he dumped all health insurance companies.

    Thirty-two-year old family physician Doug Nunamaker of Wichita, Kan., said after five years of dealing with the red tape of health insurance companies and the high overhead for the staff he hired just to deal with paperwork, he switched to a system of charging his patients a monthly fee plus the price of an office visit or test, CNN/Money reported.

    For example, under Nunamaker's membership plan -- also known as "concierge" medicine or "direct primary care" practices -- each patient pays a flat monthly fee to have unlimited access to the doctors and any medical service they can provide in the practice, such as stitches or an EKG.

    For adults up to age 44, Nunamaker charges $50 a month, pediatric services are $10 a month, and for adults age 44 and older it costs $100 a month. Although Nunamaker calls the practice "cash-only," he accepts credit and debit cards for the fees and services.


    Nunamaker and his partner negotiated deals for services outside the office. A cholesterol test costs the patient for $3, versus the $90 or more billed to insurance companies; an MRI can cost $400, compared with $2,000 or more billed to insurance companies.
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    Jun 15, 2013 3:16 PM GMT
    It is very telling that the only 'people' complaining about Obamacare on this site are SB/SC socks.
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Jun 15, 2013 3:21 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidIt is very telling that the only 'people' complaining about Obamacare on this site are SB/SC socks.





    Southbitch busted......AGAIN icon_exclaim.gif







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  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 15, 2013 5:06 PM GMT
    I think $50 a month for unlimited access is very reasonable.

    Truth be told you can always go with an emergency healthcare plan. But I wonder what does Obama care have to do with this?
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    Jun 15, 2013 7:30 PM GMT
    Chainers saidI think $50 a month for unlimited access is very reasonable.

    Truth be told you can always go with an emergency healthcare plan. But I wonder what does Obama care have to do with this?


    Not sure that you can still have a high deductible plan under Obamacare? But this is a problem because with the introduction of Obamacare, if millions more are about to be insured and start using primary care physicians extensively, it is going to severely impact availability of service because you can't just create new doctors - and there's already forecast to be a shortage of primary care physicians.

    Obamacare also introduces a significant new layer of regulation on top of the existing burdens for doctors - moving from ICD-9 to ICD-10, you're going from something like 14,000 diagnostic codes to over 68,000. It's also the lead insurers will take as well. Add to this fact that complying with insurance claims - for medicare/or private can cost up to 40% of what a practice brings in, it's easy to see why doctors are looking for another way - or just rejecting all insurance altogether.
  • Menergy_1

    Posts: 737

    Jun 15, 2013 9:12 PM GMT
    so $50/month, plus $400 net for an MRI -- vs $2000 the doctor formerly charged insurance companies....Why was he charging $2000 previously (I know that the insurance probably didn't pay that full amount billed, and he/she had the write-off as a business loss on income/business taxes....)

    I've seen the breakdown of my medical checkup or office visits and procedures, and what the office billed my health insurance plans, vs. what the plans paid/negotatiated, and I didn't get stuck with the difference.

    I understand the paperwork and staff costs for billings to insurance companies, arguing over claims with the insurers, etc. --- but what does this have to do with Affordable Care Act - except that doctors are free to not accept patients with (certain) insurance plans, just as they have been doing all along - Luckily they have patients who can afford the full cost (even if reduced from the alleged billing amounts of the past) out of their own pockets.

  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Jun 15, 2013 10:53 PM GMT
    I keep blocking SOUTHBEACH, but he keeps on popping up, like 'Whack-A-Mole !"
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    Jun 16, 2013 1:48 AM GMT
    riddler78 said
    Chainers saidI think $50 a month for unlimited access is very reasonable.

    Truth be told you can always go with an emergency healthcare plan. But I wonder what does Obama care have to do with this?


    Not sure that you can still have a high deductible plan under Obamacare? But this is a problem because with the introduction of Obamacare, if millions more are about to be insured and start using primary care physicians extensively, it is going to severely impact availability of service because you can't just create new doctors - and there's already forecast to be a shortage of primary care physicians.

    Obamacare also introduces a significant new layer of regulation on top of the existing burdens for doctors - moving from ICD-9 to ICD-10, you're going from something like 14,000 diagnostic codes to over 68,000. It's also the lead insurers will take as well. Add to this fact that complying with insurance claims - for medicare/or private can cost up to 40% of what a practice brings in, it's easy to see why doctors are looking for another way - or just rejecting all insurance altogether.


    That's right:

    U.S. producing 'abysmally low' number of primary care doctors

    UPI 6/15/2013 4:52:17 AM
    WASHINGTON, June 15 (UPI) --
    Despite a shortage of U.S. primary care doctors, less than 25 percent of new doctors go into this field, and fewer still work in rural areas, researchers say.

    Lead study author Dr. Candice Chen, an assistant research professor of the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, said the study also found only 4.8 percent of the new primary care physicians set up shop in rural areas.

    "If residency programs do not ramp up the training of these physicians the shortage in primary care, especially in remote areas, will get worse," Chen said in a statement. "The study's findings raise questions about whether federally funded graduate medical education institutions are meeting the nation's need for more primary care physicians."

    Chen and colleagues studied the career paths of 8,977 physicians who had graduated from 759 medical residency sites from 2006-08. Three to five years after the program ended, the researchers found 25.2 percent of the physicians worked as primary care doctors, although this number almost certainly was an overestimate because it included graduates who practiced as hospitalists, Chen said.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 16, 2013 1:55 AM GMT
    I haven't had health insurance since the day I became independently contracted, and have no desire to do so in the future.

    Doctors ALWAYS give you a better rate when you have no insurance. In many cases, it's cheaper than a copay.
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    Jun 16, 2013 4:06 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidI haven't had health insurance since the day I became independently contracted, and have no desire to do so in the future.

    Doctors ALWAYS give you a better rate when you have no insurance. In many cases, it's cheaper than a copay.


    When you don't get the high deductible insurance, it can become a huge issue given that the hospitals and specialists won't give you better rates without insurance... Otherwise it is almost always cheaper just to go cash for your primary care...
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Jun 16, 2013 5:50 AM GMT
    Webster666 saidI keep blocking SOUTHBEACH, but he keeps on popping up, like 'Whack-A-Mole !"





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  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 16, 2013 10:35 AM GMT
    Label and dismiss, label and dismiss, ignorance is bliss, ignorance is bliss.......
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 16, 2013 11:00 AM GMT
    Blakes7 saidLabel and dismiss, label and dismiss, ignorance is bliss, ignorance is bliss.......


    How many times have you labelled and dismissed comments with this corny old line now?
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    Jun 16, 2013 2:21 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 said
    Blakes7 saidLabel and dismiss, label and dismiss, ignorance is bliss, ignorance is bliss.......


    How many times have you labelled and dismissed comments with this corny old line now?


    And how many times are you going to keep blatantly producing debunked data? Too bad Obamacare doesn't actually solve any of the real issues related to American healthcare.
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    Jun 16, 2013 3:35 PM GMT
    It was inevitable that Obamacare would have teething troubles. The creation of the NHS had to overcome similar pitfalls. Doctors were initially dead set against the NHS and it was almost scuppered by senior specialists.

    I'd like to bet that in 20 years time, most Americans will be ranking Obamacare favourably alongside other historic social changes in their country.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 16, 2013 4:21 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidI haven't had health insurance since the day I became independently contracted, and have no desire to do so in the future.


    Too bad the Democrats could care less about your "desire" - now you MUST purchase health insurance. Isn't that nice?
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    Jun 16, 2013 4:26 PM GMT
    CallMeAnytime said
    paulflexes saidI haven't had health insurance since the day I became independently contracted, and have no desire to do so in the future.


    Too bad the Democrats could care less about your "desire" - now you MUST purchase health insurance. Isn't that nice?
    Says who? They can kiss my lilly-white pimpled ass if they think they can make me buy something I don't want.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 16, 2013 4:28 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    CallMeAnytime said
    paulflexes saidI haven't had health insurance since the day I became independently contracted, and have no desire to do so in the future.


    Too bad the Democrats could care less about your "desire" - now you MUST purchase health insurance. Isn't that nice?
    Says who? They can kiss my lilly-white pimpled ass if they think they can make me buy something I don't want.


    Oh, that's right. You don't have to buy health insurance. Instead, you'll have to pay a "tax" for not purchasing health insurance. Mind you, it's not a "fee" or a "punishment" for not doing what the government tells you to do, it's simply a "tax" for not doing something they want you to do.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 16, 2013 10:34 PM GMT
    Ex_Mil8 saidIt was inevitable that Obamacare would have teething troubles. The creation of the NHS had to overcome similar pitfalls. Doctors were initially dead set against the NHS and it was almost scuppered by senior specialists.

    I'd like to bet that in 20 years time, most Americans will be ranking Obamacare favourably alongside other historic social changes in their country.


    I'd take that bet. In fact, while it may be inevitable that Obamacare would have teething troubles, it doesn't (and can't) solve the biggest issues it claimed it would.

    But there's hope. By making healthcare almost unworkable, there are glimmers of actual solutions like primary care physicians rejecting insurance. If it continues to be that they are more profitable, more cost effective and provide better outcomes, it will force real substantive changes to both Medicare/Obamacare and the insurance industry as a whole.