Technology - Cars: Hybrid vs. Non-Hybrid Cost to Keep after 150,000 Miles

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 16, 2013 2:34 PM GMT
    Do non-hybrid cars have to have their transmissions replaced after 150,000 miles?

    I read that U.S. consumers are keeping their cars longer than 10 years. What are the big costs of doing so?
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    Jun 16, 2013 4:32 PM GMT
    Transmission replacements in modern cars are mostly due to owner neglect or abuse. It doesn't matter what type of car it is.
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    Jun 16, 2013 6:39 PM GMT
    It's pretty rare for most modern cars to require a transmission replacement, even after 150K miles. You would have to seriously beat the hell out of it over several years in order for that to happen.

    One of my previous cars, I kept for over 11 years / 115K miles. It was a manual transmission car. Only had to replace the clutch once due to regular wear and tear. The transmission was fine.
  • Suetonius

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    Jun 16, 2013 6:43 PM GMT
    The batteries are very unlikely to last that long. Who knows who much they will cost to replace>
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    Jun 16, 2013 7:01 PM GMT
    Most/all car makers that have a hybrid offer a free replacement battery warranty for up to a certain time. For Hyundai, they're offering a lifetime replacement warranty.

    And last time I checked, the cost to replace a battery on a Prius was around $3000. But I think that's mostly labor.
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    Jun 16, 2013 7:48 PM GMT
    Suetonius saidThe batteries are very unlikely to last that long. Who knows who much they will cost to replace>


    I was talking to a guy with a ford electric and he says the battery pack was expected to cost $ 15,000. That is so disappointing since that will mean electrics will have no resale value.
  • carew28

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    Jun 16, 2013 8:00 PM GMT
    My brother purchased a Honda Civic hybrid. It was expensive, but he saves a lot of money on gas. However, after buying it, his mechanic told him that there's a part in it (probably the battery pack) that will eventually wear out, and will cost quite a few thousand dollars to replace. That's quite a daunting thing to hear, and it will have to be balanced against the expected savings in gas.
  • Jonathan16

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    Jun 16, 2013 8:04 PM GMT
    Most modern cars transmissions can last over 200,000 miles. The major cost in keeping a car that long today is the technology. Car have electric everything from steering to brakes. If a fuse of short happens it can be hundreds or even thousands of dollars

    I worked at a Toyota Dealership a Prius is actually the most reliable car. However if the battery dies outside of warranty it can cost 3000-10,000 for a brand new battery. However we had customers get used batteries $500 parts and labor and never had a problem.

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    Jun 16, 2013 11:49 PM GMT
    Alpha13 said
    I was talking to a guy with a ford electric and he says the battery pack was expected to cost $ 15,000. That is so disappointing since that will mean electrics will have no resale value.


    The resale value hit is mostly due to the fact these cars can be leased or purchased with huge incentives that lower the initial price.

    GM states replacing the Chevy Volt battery pack would cost a customer between $8000 - $9500 at present. The company also expects the battery pack to last longer than the standard 8-year / 100,0000 mile warranty.

    The battery packs in cars like the Volt which use internal heating/cooling systems will likely last longer than certain cars like a Nissan Leaf which uses passive airflow to cool the batteries.
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    Jun 17, 2013 2:39 AM GMT
    xrichx saidMost/all car makers that have a hybrid offer a free replacement battery warranty for up to a certain time. For Hyundai, they're offering a lifetime replacement warranty.

    And last time I checked, the cost to replace a battery on a Prius was around $3000. But I think that's mostly labor.


    Not less than $3,000. One part of the service they didn't have in the DFW area and had to get it from Houston.

    I'm so upset with the experience of my hybrid battery dying and messing with my emotions over finances and budgeting, I'm seroiusly considering a non-hybrid.

    If a non-hybrid won't pull this sort of thing on me, then my next car will not be a hybrid.

    So, you're saying a Hyundai wouldn't have jacked me around like that, huh?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 17, 2013 2:41 AM GMT
    ATC84 and xrichx,

    There are no service issues on modern non-hybrid and non-luxury cars that cost over $1,000?


  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 17, 2013 2:43 AM GMT
    I'm tellin' you, the next time I pick up a Consumer Reports magazine on cars, I'm not going to be looking for a hybrid because of the Pop Money Grabbing of $4,000.

    I wasn't on track to put $4,000 in my retirement account this year or any other smart money move.


    This Prius battery failure has set me back, man.
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    Jun 17, 2013 2:46 AM GMT
    Jonathan16 saidMost modern cars transmissions can last over 200,000 miles. The major cost in keeping a car that long today is the technology. Car have electric everything from steering to brakes. If a fuse of short happens it can be hundreds or even thousands of dollars

    I worked at a Toyota Dealership a Prius is actually the most reliable car. However if the battery dies outside of warranty it can cost 3000-10,000 for a brand new battery. However we had customers get used batteries $500 parts and labor and never had a problem.



    Well, I wasn't offered a used battery.

    The service man told me you can't tell when they are going to die.

    I guess you know how many miles are on the used battery?
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    Jun 17, 2013 2:50 AM GMT
    carew28 saidMy brother purchased a Honda Civic hybrid. It was expensive, but he saves a lot of money on gas. However, after buying it, his mechanic told him that there's a part in it (probably the battery pack) that will eventually wear out, and will cost quite a few thousand dollars to replace. That's quite a daunting thing to hear, and it will have to be balanced against the expected savings in gas.


    SO true--and I know from experience. I got to 160,000 miles on mine.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 17, 2013 2:58 AM GMT
    I think your expectations are a little unrealistic at $1000. The longer you keep your car, the more likely you'll need to replace things due to regular wear and tear.
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    Jun 17, 2013 3:07 AM GMT
    xrichx saidI think your expectations are a little unrealistic at $1000. The longer you keep your car, the more likely you'll need to replace things due to regular wear and tear.


    Right now I'm trying to build a list of high-ticket price service issues on non-luxury cars, hybrid vs. non-hybrid.
  • Jonathan16

    Posts: 50

    Jun 17, 2013 3:29 AM GMT
    StephenOABC said
    Jonathan16 saidMost modern cars transmissions can last over 200,000 miles. The major cost in keeping a car that long today is the technology. Car have electric everything from steering to brakes. If a fuse of short happens it can be hundreds or even thousands of dollars

    I worked at a Toyota Dealership a Prius is actually the most reliable car. However if the battery dies outside of warranty it can cost 3000-10,000 for a brand new battery. However we had customers get used batteries $500 parts and labor and never had a problem.



    Well, I wasn't offered a used battery.

    The service man told me you can't tell when they are going to die.

    I guess you know how many miles are on the used battery?


    Yeah the dealerships don't mentions the used batteries. Youll have to find one online or at a junkyard.
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    Jun 17, 2013 3:44 AM GMT
    I owned a Toyota Prius that I sold after 300k miles. Never really have me any problems other than the tread of the tires has to be replaced every other year. It actually made me sad to sell it. I had my first gay kiss in that car.
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    Jun 17, 2013 4:20 AM GMT
    StephenOABC saidATC84 and xrichx,

    There are no service issues on modern non-hybrid and non-luxury cars that cost over $1,000?





    There isn't a single new car you can but that lacks any sort of $1000 plus service visit in the unlikely event something goes wrong and you have no warranty coverage.

    If you cannot purchase a new car and afford a $1000 dealership visit you should not be buying a new car.